Child Health Research Career Development Award

  • CHRCDA Leadership

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    Principal Investigator

    A photo of Dr. Arnold Strauss.

    Arnold W. Strauss, MD
    BK Rachford Professor and Chair, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

    513-636-2942

    arnold.strauss@cchmc.org

    Arnold W. Strauss, MD

    BK Rachford Professor and Chair, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

    Director, Cincinnati Children's Research Foundation

    Chief Medical Officer, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-2942

    Email: arnold.strauss@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Pediatric cardiology; genetic basis of pediatric heart disease

    Biography

    Arnold Strauss, MD, joined Cincinnati Children's in April, 2007, as chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at the UC College of Medicine, chief medical officer of Cincinnati Children's and director of the Cincinnati Children's Research Foundation. He is the seventh B.K. Rachford Memorial Chair in Pediatrics.

    Dr. Strauss is a distinguished pediatric cardiologist, scientist, educator and leader. Prior to his arrival at Cincinnati Children's, he was the chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and medical director of the Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, a position he held from 2000 to 2007. Under his leadership, the university built and opened a new hospital for children, expanded its pediatric faculty and increased grant funding for pediatric research. From 1981 to 2000, Strauss was director of the Division of Pediatric Cardiology at Washington University/St. Louis Children's Hospital.

    A respected scientist, Dr. Strauss' research focuses on understanding the molecular basis of disorders of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and the genetic causes of congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathies. He is the recipient of two of the most prestigious awards in research. In November 2006 he was awarded the American Heart Association's Basic Science Research Award for groundbreaking work that led to finding genetic defects that can cause heart failure and sudden death in infants and children. In 1991 he received the E. Mead Johnson Award for Excellence in Pediatric Research.

    Education and Training

    MD: Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, 1970.

    Residency: Pediatrics, Children's Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri, 1970-72.

    Fellowship: Cardiology, Children's Hospital and Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, 1972-75.

    Postdoctoral Fellowship: Merck, Sharp and Dohme Research Laboratories, Rahway, New Jersey, 1975-77.

    Publications

    Liebig M, Schymik I, Mueller M, Wendel U, Mayatepek E, Ruiter J, Strauss AW, Wanders RJ, Spiekerkoetter U. (2006) Neonatal screening for very long-chain acyl-coA dehydrogenase deficiency: enzymatic and molecular evaluation of neonates with elevated C14:1-carnitine levels. Pediatrics 118:1065-9.

    Khuchua Z, Yue Z, Batts L, Strauss AW. (2006) A zebrafish model of human Barth syndrome reveals the essential role of tafazzin in cardiac development and function. Circ Res 99:201-8.

    Exil VJ, Gardner CD, Rottman JN, Sims H, Bartelds B, Khuchua Z, Sindhal R, Ni G, Strauss AW. (2006) Abnormal mitochondrial bioenergetics and heart rate dysfunction in mice lacking very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 290:H1289-97.

    Bennett MJ, Russell LK, Tokunaga C, Narayan SB, Tan L, Seegmiller A, Boriack RL, Strauss AW. (2006) Reye-like syndrome resulting from novel missense mutations in mitochondrial medium- and short-chain l-3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Mol Genet Metab 89:74-9.

    Strauss AW. (2005) Surprising? Perhaps not. Long-chain fatty acid oxidation during human fetal development. Pediatr Res 57:753-4.

    Spiekerkoetter U, Tokunaga C, Wendel U, Mayatepek E, Ijlst L, Vaz FM, van Vlies N, Overmars H, Duran M, Wijburg FA, Wanders RJ, Strauss AW. (2005) Tissue carnitine homeostasis in very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient mice. Pediatr Res 57:760-4.

    Shekhawat PS, Matern D, Strauss AW. (2005) Fetal fatty acid oxidation disorders, their effect on maternal health and neonatal outcome: impact of expanded newborn screening on their diagnosis and management. Pediatr Res 57:78R-86R.

    Djouadi F, Aubey F, Schlemmer D, Ruiter JP, Wanders RJ, Strauss AW, Bastin J. (2005) Bezafibrate increases very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase protein and mRNA expression in deficient fibroblasts and is a potential therapy for fatty acid oxidation disorders. Hum Mol Genet 14:2695-703.

    Browning MF, Larson C, Strauss A, Marsden DL. (2005) Normal acylcarnitine levels during confirmation of abnormal newborn screening in long-chain fatty acid oxidation defects. J Inherit Metab Dis 28:545-50.

    Strauss AW. (2004) Tandem mass spectrometry in discovery of disorders of the metabolome. J Clin Invest 113:354-6.

    Spierkerkoetter U, Khuchua Z, Yue Z, Strauss AW. (2004) The early-onset phenotype of mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency: a lethal disorder with multiple tissue involvement. J Inherit Metab Dis 27:294-6.

    Spiekerkoetter U, Tokunaga C, Wendel U, Mayatepek E, Exil V, Duran M, Wijburg FA, Wanders RJ, Strauss AW. (2004) Changes in blood carnitine and acylcarnitine profiles of very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient mice subjected to stress. Eur J Clin Invest 34:191-6.

    Spiekerkoetter U, Khuchua Z, Yue Z, Bennett MJ, Strauss AW. (2004) General mitochondrial trifunctional protein (TFP) deficiency as a result of either alpha- or beta-subunit mutations exhibits similar phenotypes because mutations in either subunit alter TFP complex expression and subunit turnover. Pediatr Res 55:190-6.

    Spiekerkoetter U, Bennett MJ, Ben-Zeev B, Strauss AW, Tein I. (2004) Peripheral neuropathy, episodic myoglobinuria, and respiratory failure in deficiency of the mitochondrial trifunctional protein. Muscle Nerve 29:66-72.

    McKinney JT, Longo N, Hahn SH, Matern D, Rinaldo P, Strauss AW, Dobrowolski SF. (2004) Rapid, comprehensive screening of the human medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase gene. Mol Genet Metab 82:112-20.

    Strauss A, Lock JE. (2003) Pediatric cardiomyopathy--a long way to go. N Engl J Med 348:1703-5.

    Spiekerkoetter U, Sun B, Zytkovicz T, Wanders R, Strauss AW, Wendel U. (2003) MS/MS-based newborn and family screening detects asymptomatic patients with very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. J Pediatr 143:335-42.

    Spiekerkoetter U, Sun B, Khuchua Z, Bennett MJ, Strauss AW. (2003) Molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity in mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency due to beta-subunit mutations. Hum Mutat 21:598-607.

    Shekhawat P, Bennett MJ, Sadovsky Y, Nelson DM, Rakheja D, Strauss AW. (2003) Human placenta metabolizes fatty acids: implications for fetal fatty acid oxidation disorders and maternal liver diseases. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 284:E1098-105.

    Khuchua Z, Wozniak DF, Bardgett ME, Yue Z, McDonald M, Boero J, Hartman RE, Sims H, Strauss AW. (2003) Deletion of the N-terminus of murine map2 by gene targeting disrupts hippocampal ca1 neuron architecture and alters contextual memory. Neuroscience 119:101-11.

    Exil VJ, Roberts RL, Sims H, McLaughlin JE, Malkin RA, Gardner CD, Ni G, Rottman JN, Strauss AW. (2003) Very-long-chain acyl-coenzyme a dehydrogenase deficiency in mice. Circ Res 93:448-55.

    Zytkovicz TH, Fitzgerald EF, Marsden D, Larson CA, Shih VE, Johnson DM, Strauss AW, Comeau AM, Eaton RB, Grady GF. (2001) Tandem mass spectrometric analysis for amino, organic, and fatty acid disorders in newborn dried blood spots: a two-year summary from the New England Newborn Screening Program. Clin Chem 47:1945-55.

    Ibdah JA, Paul H, Zhao Y, Binford S, Salleng K, Cline M, Matern D, Bennett MJ, Rinaldo P, Strauss AW. (2001) Lack of mitochondrial trifunctional protein in mice causes neonatal hypoglycemia and sudden death. J Clin Invest 107:1403-9.

    Barycki JJ, O'Brien LK, Strauss AW, Banaszak LJ. (2000) Sequestration of the active site by interdomain shifting. Crystallographic and spectroscopic evidence for distinct conformations of L-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. J Biol Chem 275:27186-96.

    Ibdah JA, Bennett MJ, Rinaldo P, Zhao Y, Gibson B, Sims HF, Strauss AW. (1999) A fetal fatty-acid oxidation disorder as a cause of liver disease in pregnant women. N Engl J Med 340:1723-31.

    Program Director

    A photo of Marc Rothenberg, MD, PhD.

    Marc E. Rothenberg, MD, PhD
    Director, Division of Allergy and Immunology

    513-803-0257

    marc.rothenberg@cchmc.org

    Marc E. Rothenberg, MD, PhD

    Director, Division of Allergy and Immunology

    Director, Cincinnati Center for Eosinophilic Disorders

    Program Director, CHRCDA (K12)

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-0257

    Fax: 513-636-3310

    Email: marc.rothenberg@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Eosinophilia; eosinophilic disorders; asthma; allergy; food allergy

    Research Interests

    Eosinophils; chemokines

    Visit the Rothenberg Lab.

    Biography

    Marc E. Rothenberg, MD, PhD, is the Director of the Division of Allergy and Immunology at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, and a tenured Professor of Pediatrics at Cincinnati Children’s and the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He graduated summa cum laude with Highest Honors in Chemistry and Biochemistry from Brandeis University. He then matriculated at Harvard Medical School in the combined MD / PhD program. His PhD under the mentorship of Dr. Frank Austen included seminal studies on eosinophil hematopoiesis, as he developed the first culture system for human eosinophils.

    After completing a two-year residency in pediatrics at Children’s Hospital in Boston, Dr. Rothenberg did a combined fellowship in allergy / immunology and hematology at Children’s Hospital in Boston. During this fellowship program, Dr. Rothenberg did post-doctorate training in the genetics laboratory of Dr. Philip Leder at Harvard Medical School, where he cloned the eotaxin chemokine. After being on faculty of Harvard Medical School for one year, he came to the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children's, one of the largest pediatric medical and research centers in the United States. He is actively involved in managing a research program focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms of allergic disorders. At Cincinnati Children’s, he has helped build a top program in pediatric research, and his division is a leader in pediatric allergy and immunology. In addition, he sees patients suffering from allergic and immunological diseases from around the world as part of the Cincinnati Center for Eosinophilic Disorders that he directs.

    Dr. Rothenberg’s awards include the Pharmacia Allergy Research Foundation Award for the best young investigator in the allergy field; the Young Investigator Award and the Scholar in Allergy Award from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology; the Ohio Governor’s Recognition Award; the 2007 E Mead Johnson Award from the Society of Pediatric Research; and an NIH MERIT Award in 2010 from the NIAID. He is an elected member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation, Society for Pediatric Research, and a Diplomate of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

    Among his extensive publications of more than 250 articles on molecular mechanisms of allergic responses, Dr. Rothenberg edited a book entitled, “Chemokines in Allergic Disease”. He has served on various review panels for journals and grant agencies including the National Institutes of Health, where he served on the Advisory Council of the NIAID, Burroughs Trust, and the Medical Research Council of the UK. His research has been supported by numerous sources including the National Institutes of Health, the USA Department of Defense, Human Frontier Science Program Organization, the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, the Dana Foundation, and the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network.

    Visit the Rothenberg Lab website

    Education and Training

    MD, PhD: Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA, 1990.

    Residency: Pediatrics, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, 1991-1992.

    Fellowship: Immunology / Allergy, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, 1992-1994; Hematology / Oncology, Children's Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, 1992-1995.

    Certification: National Board of Medical Examiners, 1991; Board of Registration in Medicine, MA, 1992; American Board of Pediatrics, 1995, 2001, 2008; Ohio State Medical Board, 1997; American Board of Allergy and Immunology, 1997, 2006.

    Publications

    Grants

    NICHHD Pediatric Center for Gene Expression and Developmental Sciences. Program Director. National Institutes of Health. 2007-2011. K12 HD028827.

    IL-13 and Eosinophilic Esophagitis. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health.  2007-2012. R01 DK076893.

    Genetics of Eosinophilic Esophagitis. Principal Investigator. Department of Defense. 2010-2012. DOD W81XWH1010167. 

    Resistin-like Molecules in the Lung. Co-Principal Investigator. US-Israel Binational Science Foundation. 2010-2012. #2009222. 

    IL-13 Associated Eosinophil Lung Responses. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. 2009-2014. R01 AI083450.

    Regulation of Gastrointestinal Eosinophils. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. 2009-2014. R37 AI045898. 

    Program Co-Director

    Gregory A. Grabowski, MD

    Adjunct Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-7290

    Fax: 513-636-2261

    Email: greg.grabowski@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Lysosomal storage diseases; molecular enzymology; gaucher disease; Fabry disease; molecular pathogenesis

    Research Interests

    Molecular pathogenesis and therapy of human genetic disease

    Education and Training

    MD: University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, 1970 to 1974.

    Residency: University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 1974 to 1976.

    Fellowship: University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 1976 to 1979.

    Certification: American Board of Pediatrics, 1980; American Board of Medical Genetics; Clinical Genetics, 1987; Clinical Biochemical Genetics, 1987; Clinical Molecular Genetics, 1993.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications.

    Stuart Handwerger, MD

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Professor of Cancer and Cell Biology

    Phone: 513-636-4209

    Fax: 513-636-7486

    Email: stuart.handwerger@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Regulation of gene expression in human placenta and uterine decidua during differentiation.

    Visit the Handwerger Lab.

    Education and Training

    MD: University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 1964.

    Residency: Mt. Sinai Hospital, New York, NY, 1965 to 1966.

    Fellowship: Harvard Medical School, Children's Hospital Medical Center, Boston, MA, 1968 to 1969.

    Certification: Diplomate, American Board of Pediatrics, 1969; Subspecialty Boards, Pediatric Endocrinology, 1978.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    A photo of James Heubi.

    James E. Heubi, MD
    Director, Clinical Translational Research Center

    513-636-4415

    james.heubi@cchmc.org

    James E. Heubi, MD

    Director, Clinical Translational Research Center

    Co-Director, Center for Clinical and Translational Science and Training

    Associate Dean, Clinical and Translational Research

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4415

    Fax: 513-636-4695

    Email: james.heubi@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Inflammatory bowel disease; cholestatic liver disease; malabsorption

    Research Interests

    Cholesterol absorption; cholesterol metabolism; inborn errors of bile acid metabolism; bone metabolism in health and disease; TPN-related cholestasis and its treatment

    Biography

    James E. Heubi, MD, has been a practicing pediatric gastroenterologist since 1979, when he joined the staff at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

    Dr. Heubi's practice includes the treatment of all disorders affecting the gastrointestinal tract, liver and biliary tract and pancreas.

    Dr. Heubi's areas of practice interests include liver disease and complications related to end-stage liver disease and liver transplantation and the management of patients with "short gut" or compromised gut function requiring prolonged enteral or parenteral nutritional support.

    Dr. Heubi is the Director of General Clinical Research Center at Cincinnati Children's and is the Associate Dean for Clinical Research, University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine.

    Education and Training

    MD: Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, 1973.

    Residency: James Whitcomb Riley Hospital for Children, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN, 1973 to 1975.

    Fellowship: Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, 1975 to 1978.

    Certification: Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 1990.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Margaret Hostetter.

    Margaret K. Hostetter, MD
    Director, Infectious Diseases

    513-636-4509

    margaret.hostetter@cchmc.org

    Margaret K. Hostetter, MD

    Director, Infectious Diseases

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4509

    Email: margaret.hostetter@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Bacterial and fungal infections; medical evaluation of internationally adopted children

    Education and Training

    MD: Baylor College of Medicine.

    Residency: Boston Children’s Hospital.

    Training Fellowship: Boston Children’s Hospital.

    Board Certification: Pediatrics; Pediatric Infectious Diseases.

    A photo of Jeffrey Robbins, PhD.

    Jeffrey Robbins, PhD
    Director and Endowed Chair, Molecular Cardiovascular Biology

    513-636-8098

    jeffrey.robbins@cchmc.org

    Jeffrey Robbins, PhD

    Director and Endowed Chair, Molecular Cardiovascular Biology

    Executive Co-Director, Heart Institute

    Associate Chair, Children's Hospital Research Foundation

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-8098

    Email: jeffrey.robbins@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Structure function relationships for the contractile proteins;  cardiac-specific gene manipulation in transgenic rabbits; the contractile protein myosin, and human heart failure; molecular studies of human valve disease

    Visit the Robbins Lab.

    Biography

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Cardiac Signaling in the Normal and Abnormal Heart. Principal Investigator. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Jun 2002 - Nov 2012.  #P01HL69779.

    Cardiomyocyte Toxicity and Heart Failure in Desmin Related Cardiomyopathy. Principal Investigator. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Jan 2008 - Dec 2012. #R01 HL087862.

    A photo of Jeffrey Whitsett.

    Jeffrey A. Whitsett, MD
    Co-Director, Perinatal Institute

    513-803-2790

    jeffrey.whitsett@cchmc.org

    Jeffrey A. Whitsett, MD

    Co-Director, Perinatal Institute

    Chief, Section of Neonatology, Perinatal and Pulmonary Biology

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-2790

    Fax: 513-636-7868

    Email: jeffrey.whitsett@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Cystic fibrosis research; lung morphogenesis; control of gene expression in the respiratory epithelium; gene delivery and therapy 

    Visit the Whitsett Lab.

    Biography

    Jeffrey A. Whitsett, MD, is chief of the Section of Neonatology, Perinatal and Pulmonary Biology at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

    Dr. Whitsett received his medical degree from Columbia University, in New York, and has been a faculty member since 1977. He is internationally known for his research in pulmonary medicine, as well as for his clinical expertise in neonatology.

    Dr. Whitsett has made a series of groundbreaking contributions in pulmonary medicine. His major pioneering work has been on surfactant proteins A, B, C and D, cloning their genes, and clarifying their roles in lung development.

    Throughout his career, Dr. Whitsett has had the remarkable ability to move from molecular biology, to animal models, to diagnosis and therapy of human disease. He played a critical role in making surfactant protein replacement a routine tool for treating immature lungs and respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants. His laboratory has contributed to the identification of a number of genes critical for lung formation and function. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis were shown to cause acute and chronic lung disease in infants and adults.

    Dr. Whitsett is a member of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences and is the recipient of the Mead Johnson Award, a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Merit Award, the first Julius Comroe Lectureship in Pulmonary Research from FASEB, the William Cooper Procter Award from Cincinnati Children's, the Amberson Lecture Award of the American Thoracic Society, the prestigious Daniel Drake Medal for scientific contributions from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, the International Arvo Ylppö Medal from the Finnish Foundation for Pediatric Research and the Grand Hamdan International Award on Neonatal Medicine from the United Arab Emirates.

    Dr. Whitsett is the author of more than 400 papers in both the basic science and clinical literature.

    Education and Training

    MD: Columbia University, New York, NY, 1973.

    Residency: Pediatrics, Mt. Sinai Hospital, New York City, 1974 to 1976.

    Fellowship: Neonatology, Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 1976 to 1977.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications