Child Health Research Career Development Award

  • CHRCDA Mentors

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    Mentors

    A photo of Bruce Aronow.

    Bruce J. Aronow, PhD
    Co-director, Computational Medicine Center

    513-636-0263

    bruce.aronow@cchmc.org

    Bruce J Aronow, PhD

    Co-director, Computational Medicine Center

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-0263

    Fax: 513-636-2056

    Email: bruce.aronow@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Biography

    Dr. Aronow's research is devoted to unraveling both the role and mechanism by which the functional capabilities of the human genome shape human health and our ability to adapt to stressful challenges. His lab is using a variety of available structural and functional genomic and biological systems descriptive data to form models of how biological systems assemble, adapt and become impaired in disease. The lab's overall hypothesis is that by interconnecting as much experimental and observational information as possible, we can gain new insights into the mechanisms by which different biological systems can achieve health or healthy adaptation, or undergo disease processes. More specific, with the co-leadership of Anil Jegga, DVM, the lab is identifying genetic features that control gene expression including cis-elements, trans factors and microRNAs, which normally work together in extended cell, tissue, organ and systems networks to enable development and homeostasis. Alterations of these features can alter phenotypes and increase or decrease disease. Some of the lab's work includes the identification of conserved, diverged and evolved cis-element clusters that are acted on by transcription and chromatin proteins. The lab has developed a Web-based tool called GenomeTraFaC that at present allows discovery of shared cis-elements in conserved non-coding sequences of mice and humans.

    Education and Training

    BS: Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 1976.

    PhD: Biochemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 1986.

    Research Fellowship: Division of Basic Science Research, Cincinnati Children's Research Foundation, Cincinnati, OH, 1986-1989.

    Publications

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    Grants

    CTSA - Enabling Tehnologies: Center for Translational & Molecular Disease. National Institutes of Health. Apr 2009 - Mar 2014.
    A photo of David Bernstein.

    David I. Bernstein, MD, MA
    Director, Gamble Program and VTEU

    513-636-7625

    david.bernstein@cchmc.org

    David I. Bernstein, MD, MA

    Director, Gamble Program and VTEU

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-7625

    Fax: 513-636-7682

    Email: david.bernstein@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Rotavirus; herpes simplex virus; cytomegalovirus; preclinical and clinical evaluations of vaccine; immune response to herpes virus

    Research Interests

    Evaluation of vaccines and antivirals for herpes and rotovirus; development of improved adjuvants and delivery systems for vaccines; treatment and prevention of influenza, norovirus and parvovirus infections

    Biography

    Dr. Bernstein received his MA degree in microbiology and his MD degree from SUNY at Buffalo. His pediatric training was undertaken at USC and the New England Medical Center. This was followed by an ID fellowship at UCLA.

    During his fellowship he became interested in herpes viruses and vaccines. Upon arrival at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center he began his work investigating the immunobiology of genital herpes infections. At this time he also became interested in rotavirus and along with his colleague Dr. Richard Ward he investigated the immune responses that provide protection.

    This work led to the development of a live attenuated human rotavirus vaccine initially named 89-12. The 89-12 vaccine was further modified and became the GlaxoSmithKline rotavirus vaccine, Rotarix, currently available in over 100 countries including the USA and EU. Dr. Bernstein is currently evaluating vaccines for CMV, HSV, influenza, avian influenza, RSV, norovirus and parvovirus. Dr. Bernstein has published over 200 manuscripts and book chapters on infectious diseases, vaccines and antivirals. Dr. Bernstein is currently the Albert Sabin Professor of pediatrics and director of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Cincinnati Children’s and directs one of eight NIH funded Vaccine Evaluation Units.

    Education and Training

    MA: Microbiology, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 1973.

    MD: State University of New York at Buffalo School of Medicine, Buffalo, NY, 1977.

    Residency: Pediatrics, University of Southern California Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA; Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA.

    Fellowship: Pediatric Infectious Disease, University of California, Los Angeles, CA.

    Certification: American Board of Medical Examiners, 1978; American Board of Pediatrics, 1981; Pediatrics, 1982.

    Publications

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    Grants

    Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units (VTEUs): Evaluation of Control Measures Against Diseases Other Than AIDS. Principal Investigator. 2007 - 2014. #NO1-AI-80006.


    Jorge A. Bezerra, MD

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-3008

    Fax: 513-636-5581

    Email: jorge.bezerra@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Biography

    Jorge A. Bezerra, MD, joined the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition in 1990, when he began his fellowship training in pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition and graduated in 1993.

    From 1992-1994, Dr. Bezerra was a research scholar in the Division of Basic Sciences. He was appointed to the division in 1994 as an assistant professor of pediatrics.

    Dr. Bezerra completed his residency in pediatrics at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona.

    Dr. Bezerra has an active research career with his primary interests in molecular control of liver regeneration, biliary atresia, and genetic basis of intrahepatic cholestasis.

    In addition to his research work, Dr. Bezerra is an active clinician for the outpatient GI clinical service and the inpatient liver service.

    Education and Training

    MD: Federal University Rio Grande Norte, Natal, Brazil, 1984

    Residency: University of Arizona, Tuscon, AZ, 1989

    Fellowship: Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, 1994

    Certification: Pediatrics, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Mitchell Cohen.

    Mitchell B. Cohen, MD
    Vice-Chair of Pediatrics for Clinical Affairs

    513-636-3008

    mitchell.cohen@cchmc.org

    Mitchell B. Cohen, MD

    Vice-Chair of Pediatrics for Clinical Affairs

    Director, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Associate Professor, Internal Medicine

    Phone: 513-636-3008

    Fax: 513-636-5581

    Email: mitchell.cohen@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Diarrheal disorders; inflammatory bowel disease; celiac disease

    Research Interests

    Intestinal secretion; diarrheal disease; developmental biology

    Visit the Cohen-Steinbrecher Lab.

    Biography

    Mitchell B. Cohen, MD, completed his pediatric training at Johns Hopkins Hospital and entered the public health service where he served at the Keams Canyon Indian Hospital on the Hopi Reservation in northeast Arizona. Subsequently, he completed a pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition fellowship at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

    Dr. Cohen has had a long-standing interest in the pathophysiology of diarrheal diseases and continues to direct basic science and clinical research programs related to intestinal secretion and infection. These programs include studies of the guanylin family of intestinal peptides, epidemiology and pathogenesis of diarrheagenic E. coli and studies of human cholera and typhoid fever vaccines.

    Dr. Cohen is the director of Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition at Cincinnati Children's. He is also vice-chair of Pediatrics for Clinical Affairs, associate director of the NIDDK-funded Silvio O. Conte Digestive Diseases Research Core Centers (DDRCC) entitled Digestive Health Center (DHC): Bench-to-Bedside Research in Pediatric Digestive Disease and the director of the NIH-funded Fellowship Training Program in Pediatric Gastroenterology.

    Dr. Cohen has served as president of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) and chair of the section on Growth Development and Aging of the American Gastroenterological Association. He is a member of the Clinical Research Committee of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFFTI), and has served as permanent and ad hoc member on a number of NIH study sections and the National Commission on Digestive Diseases.

    Education and Training

    MD: Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, 1977.

    Residency: Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, 1977 to 1980.

    Fellowship: Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Children's Hospital Medical Center of Cincinnati, 1983 to 1986; Research Scholar, Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Children's Hospital Medical Center of Cincinnati, 1986 to 1987.

    Certification: Pediatrics, 1981; Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 1990, 1997, 2004.

    Publications

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    Grants

    Digestive Health Center:  Bench to Bedside Research in Pediatric Digestive Disease. Program Director; Director, Administrative Core. National Institutes of Health. Aug 2007 - May 2012. #P30 DK 0789392. 

    Evaluation of control measures against human infectious diseases other than AIDS. Co-Investigator. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Nov 2007 - Oct 2012. #N01-AI25459.


    Jay L. Degen, PhD

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4679

    Email: jay.degen@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Molecular genetics of plasminogen activation in development, hemostasis, and tumor progression; molecular genetics and biological role of plasminogen activation in development, hemostasis, wound repair, and disease

    Biography

    Jay L. Degen, PhD, is studying the regulation and biological roles of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), the two mammalian enzymes that convert plasminogen to the active serine protease, plasmin.

    The PA/plasmin system of proteases is of particular interest because of its apparent dual function in the lysis of vascular fibrin clots (fibrinolysis) and the degradation of extracellular matrix in tissue remodeling and cell migration events. 

    Over the last few years, Dr. Degen's lab has generated and characterized gene-targeted mouse lines with deficits in the factors that are the foundation of the coagulation and fibrinolytic cascades, including fibrinogen-, plasminogen-, plasminogen activator-, and plasminogen activator receptor-deficient mouse lines.

    These unique experimental animals are being intensively analyzed with regard to a wide range of phenotypic properties, including hemostasis, wound healing, angiogenesis and tumor biology.

    Education and Training

    PhD: University of Washington, 1983. 

    Publications

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    Grants

    Thrombin-mediated proteolysis in neuroinflammatory disease. Principal Investigator. National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Jul 2009  – Jun 2014. #R01 HL096126.
    A photo of Lee Denson.

    Lee A. Denson, MD
    Medical Director, Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center

    513-636-7575

    lee.denson@cchmc.org

    Lee A. Denson, MD

    Medical Director, Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-7575

    Email: lee.denson@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Inflammatory bowel disease; growth failure; celiac disease

    Visit the Denson Lab.

    Biography

    The primary focus of Dr. Lee A. Denson's laboratory is to determine the molecular basis for alterations in growth hormone signaling in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD).

    Normal growth and development are dependent upon the ability of growth hormone to regulate IGF-1 expression. Evidence from studies in children with IBD and mouse models of colitis indicates that inflammatory cytokines which are up regulated in this setting may cause an acquired GH resistance. Consequences may include growth failure, altered body composition and impaired mucosal healing.

    We are using complementary experimental and patient-based approaches to investigate regulation of growth hormone signaling in mouse models of colitis and in children with Crohn's disease. These include down regulation of the growth hormone receptor and up regulation of a family of post-receptor inhibitory proteins, the Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS). These studies should lead to the development of more effective therapies for children with IBD and other chronic inflammatory conditions.

    Education and Training

    MD: Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA, 1993

    Residency: Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT, 1993-96.

    Certification: Pediatrics, 1996 & 2002.

    Fellowship: Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 1996-99.

    Publications

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    A photo of SK Dey.

    SK Dey, PhD
    Lova Riekert Chair and Professor of Pediatrics, Cancer and Cell Biology

    513-803-1158

    sk.dey@cchmc.org

    Sudhansu K. Dey, PhD

    Lova Riekert Chair and Professor of Pediatrics, Cancer and Cell Biology

    Director, Division of Reproductive Sciences

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-1158

    Fax: 513-803-1160

    Email: sk.dey@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Prostaglandin-nuclear receptor-angiogenic signaling axis during embryo implantation with special emphasis to cPLA2α-Cox2-PPARδ-Vegf network in the uterus; cytokine-growth factor-homeobox-morphogen signaling axis in implantation involving Lif-Hb-Egf-Hoxa10/Msx1-Ihh/Bmp/Wnt network in the uterus; immunophilin/cochaperone-nuclear signaling in the mouse uterus during implantation involving Fkbp52-PR; ligand-receptor signaling with endocannabinoids during the periimplantation events in mice in the context of anandamide interacting with G-protein coupled receptors, CB1 and CB2; molecular and genetic basis of epithelial ovarian cancer with special reference to prostaglandin-PPAR signaling; miRNA and Cox-2 regulation in uterine biology and cancer; Pten and uterine carcinoma: conditionally gene deleted mouse models

    Visit the Dey Lab.

    Biography

    Dr. Dey received his PhD from The University of Calcutta College of Sciences in 1972, after which he received postdoctoral training at the University of Kansas Medical Center from 1973-1977, followed by his faculty appointment in 1977 where he rose to the rank of University Distinguished Professor. He moved to Vanderbilt University as Dorothy Overall Wells professor of pediatrics, cell and developmental biology and pharmacology in 2002. In both places he directed NIH-funded reproductive biology training grants. In 2008, Dr. Dey moved to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center as Lova Riekert Chair and professor of pediatrics to start a new Division of Reproductive Sciences. He has published over 300 original articles and has been funded by two MERIT Awards, RO1 grants and a Program Project Grants from NIH, and grants from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and March of Dimes Foundation. His research mission has been to define the molecular road map to embryo-uterine interactions during pregnancy. His recent work published in Developmental Cell, Nat Med, PNAS and JCI provides novel information in the context of cell polarity in implantation, ectopic pregnancy, progesterone resistance to pregnancy failure and premature decidual senescence in preterm delivery. In 2008, Dr. Dey received Carl G. Hartman Award, the highest honor of the Society for the Study of Reproduction. In 2009, he received IVI Award sponsored by Schering-Plough for best contribution in Reproductive Medicine.

    He has graduated seven PhD students and mentored over 40 postdoctoral fellows, 20 of whom are currently independent faculty members, and most others are investigators in major research institutions. His laboratory currently consists of one junior faculty, four postdoctoral fellows, one MD/PhD student, and two research assistants.

    Education and Training

    BSc: Presidency College, Calcutta, India, 1965.

    MSc:
    University of Calcutta, India, 1967.

    PhD:
    University of Calcutta, India, 1972.

    Publications

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    Jeffrey N. Epstein, PhD.

    Jeffrey N. Epstein, PhD
    Director, Center for ADHD, Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology

    513-636-8296

    jeff.epstein@cchmc.org

    Jeff N. Epstein, PhD

    Director, Center for ADHD, Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology

    Clinical Psychologist, Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-8296

    Fax: 513-636-0755

    Email: jeff.epstein@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

    Biography

    Jeff Epstein, PhD, is a professor of pediatrics in Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. He earned his doctorate in clinical psychology from State University of New York at Stony Brook and completed a clinical internship at the Medical University of South Carolina.

    Dr. Epstein is a licensed psychologist whose research and clinical work focus on the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD and other psychological disorders originating in childhood.

    He is a co-investigator on the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with ADHD (MTA). Dr. Epstein has published numerous empirical papers on a variety of ADHD-related topics. Much of his empirical research has concentrated on the neuropsychology of ADHD, and the promotion of evidence-based ADHD care among community pediatricians.

    Education and Training

    PhD: State University of New York, Stony Brook, 1994.

    Internship: Medical University of South Carolina, 1994.

    Publications

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    Grants

    Development of a Multi-faceted Cognitive Training Program for Children with ADHD. Principal Investigator. Apr 2009 - Mar 2013. #1R21/R33MH084842.

    Medication Continuity in Children Treated for ADHD. Primary Mentor. Jan 2010 - Dec 2014. #K23 MH083027.

    Reading ICARD: Interventions for Children with Attention and Reading Disorders. Co-investigator. Dec 2009 - Nov 2014. #R01 HD060617.

    Effects of Adolescent Sleep Restriction on Neural and Neurobehavioral Functioning. Co-investigator. Jul 2009 - Jun 2014. #R01HL092149.

    Evaluation of an Intervention for Improving Community-Based Pediatric ADHD Care. Principal Investigator. Jul 2010 – Jun 2015. #R01 MH083665-01. 

    Examining the Biological Basis of ADHD. Principal Investigator. Jul 2010 - Jun 2015. #K24 MH064478-06A2.

    2/2 Multisite Study of School Based Treatment Approaches for ADHD Adolescents. Co-investigator. Jul 2009 - Jun 2014. #1R01MH082865-01.

    Medication Response in Children with Predominantly Inattentive Type ADHD. Primary Mentor. Jun 2009 - Mar 2014. #K23MH083881.

    Gregory A. Grabowski, MD

    Adjunct Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-7290

    Fax: 513-636-2261

    Email: greg.grabowski@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Lysosomal storage diseases; molecular enzymology; gaucher disease; Fabry disease; molecular pathogenesis

    Research Interests

    Molecular pathogenesis and therapy of human genetic disease

    Education and Training

    MD: University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, 1970 to 1974.

    Residency: University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 1974 to 1976.

    Fellowship: University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 1976 to 1979.

    Certification: American Board of Pediatrics, 1980; American Board of Medical Genetics; Clinical Genetics, 1987; Clinical Biochemical Genetics, 1987; Clinical Molecular Genetics, 1993.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications.

    Stuart Handwerger, MD

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Professor of Cancer and Cell Biology

    Phone: 513-636-4209

    Fax: 513-636-7486

    Email: stuart.handwerger@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Regulation of gene expression in human placenta and uterine decidua during differentiation.

    Visit the Handwerger Lab.

    Education and Training

    MD: University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 1964.

    Residency: Mt. Sinai Hospital, New York, NY, 1965 to 1966.

    Fellowship: Harvard Medical School, Children's Hospital Medical Center, Boston, MA, 1968 to 1969.

    Certification: Diplomate, American Board of Pediatrics, 1969; Subspecialty Boards, Pediatric Endocrinology, 1978.

    Publications

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    A photo of Dr. John Harley.

    John B. Harley, MD, PhD
    Director, Rheumatology

    513-803-3665

    john.harley@cchmc.org

    John B. Harley, MD, PhD

    Director, Rheumatology

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-3665

    Email: john.harley@cchmc.org

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    Publications

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    Grants

    Molecular & Immunologic Analysis of the Pathobiology of Human Anthrax. Co-Principal Investigator. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Sep 2009 - Aug 2014. #AI062629-06.

    Genomics of Lupus. Principal Investigator. Aug 2009 - Jul 2014. #1 P01 AI083194-01.

    Oklahoma Autoimmunity Center of Excellence Project 2. Co-investigator. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. May 2009 - Apr 2014. #1 U19 AI082714-01.

    Genome-Wide Association Study in African-Americans with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Principal Investigator. Department of Defense. Sep 2010- Aug 2013. #PR094002.

    Genomics of Lupus Associations in the Hispanic 12q24 Linkage. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Jun 2008 - Mar 2013. #5 P01 AR049084-07.

    Lupus Association with Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 4. Principal Investigator. US Department of Veterans Affairs. Apr 2008 - Mar 2012.

    Genetic Linkage in Lupus. Principal Investigator. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Feb 2010 - Jan 2012. #3 R37 AI024717-21S1.

    A photo of Gurjit Khurana Hershey.

    Gurjit Khurana Hershey, MD, PhD
    Director, Division of Asthma Research

    513-636-7054

    gurjit.hershey@cchmc.org

    A photo of Gurjit Khurana Hershey.

    Gurjit Khurana Hershey, MD, PhD

    Director, Division of Asthma Research

    Co-Director, Office of Pediatric Clinical Fellowships

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-7054

    Email: gurjit.hershey@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Clinical

    Asthma; allergic rhinitis; food allergy; urticaria

    Research

    Genetics of allergy and asthma; cytokines; signaling pathways

    Visit the Khurana Hershey Lab

    Biography

    Gurjit Khurana Hershey, MD, PhD, received a BS degree from the University of Iowa, and MD and PhD degrees from Washington University School of Medicine. After completing pediatric residency and an allergy/immunology Fellowship at St. Louis Children’s Hospital, Dr. Khurana Hershey joined the faculty at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. She now directs the Division of Asthma Research at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and is the director of the Medical Scientist Training Program at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

    In addition to her clinical duties, Dr. Khurana Hershey directs an NIH-funded research program focused on the genetics and genomics of allergic inflammation with a focus on cytokines and signal transduction. Her research has been continuously funded for over fifteen years. She is the principal investigator of an NIH-funded Asthma and Allergic Diseases Cooperative Research Center (AADCRC), and is also the PI of the Inner City Asthma Consortium, an NIH funded subcontract. She is the PI of the UC T32 MSTP training grant. In addition to her research contributions, she is an outstanding clinician and teacher/mentor. Several of her trainees now hold academic faculty positions. She is the recipient of the 2013 Cincinnati Children’s Educational Achievement Award.

    Dr. Khurana Hershey is a fellow of the American Pediatric Society and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. She serves on the Executive Council of the American Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology Program Committee, is the Chair of the Grant Review Committee and appointed Vice Chair of the Basic and Immunology Interest Section. She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. She was recently named One of the Five Leading Women in Healthcare in the Greater Cincinnati Metropolitan Area, and Outstanding Woman at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.

    Education and Training

    BS: University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, 1985.

    PhD: Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 1990.

    MD: Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 1992. 

    Residency: St. Louis Children's Hospital, St. Louis, MO, 1992-1995. 

    Fellowship: St. Louis Children's Hospital, St. Louis, MO, 1995-1997.

    Board Certification: American Board of Pediatrics, 2009 - Present.

    Board Certification: American Board of Allergy and Immunology, 2008 - Present.

    Publications

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    A photo of James Heubi.

    James E. Heubi, MD
    Director, Clinical Translational Research Center

    513-636-4415

    james.heubi@cchmc.org

    James E. Heubi, MD

    Director, Clinical Translational Research Center

    Co-Director, Center for Clinical and Translational Science and Training

    Associate Dean, Clinical and Translational Research

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4415

    Fax: 513-636-4695

    Email: james.heubi@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Inflammatory bowel disease; cholestatic liver disease; malabsorption

    Research Interests

    Cholesterol absorption; cholesterol metabolism; inborn errors of bile acid metabolism; bone metabolism in health and disease; TPN-related cholestasis and its treatment

    Biography

    James E. Heubi, MD, has been a practicing pediatric gastroenterologist since 1979, when he joined the staff at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

    Dr. Heubi's practice includes the treatment of all disorders affecting the gastrointestinal tract, liver and biliary tract and pancreas.

    Dr. Heubi's areas of practice interests include liver disease and complications related to end-stage liver disease and liver transplantation and the management of patients with "short gut" or compromised gut function requiring prolonged enteral or parenteral nutritional support.

    Dr. Heubi is the Director of General Clinical Research Center at Cincinnati Children's and is the Associate Dean for Clinical Research, University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine.

    Education and Training

    MD: Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, 1973.

    Residency: James Whitcomb Riley Hospital for Children, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN, 1973 to 1975.

    Fellowship: Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, 1975 to 1978.

    Certification: Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 1990.

    Publications

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    A photo of Margaret Hostetter.

    Margaret K. Hostetter, MD
    Director, Infectious Diseases

    513-636-4509

    margaret.hostetter@cchmc.org

    Margaret K. Hostetter, MD

    Director, Infectious Diseases

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4509

    Email: margaret.hostetter@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Bacterial and fungal infections; medical evaluation of internationally adopted children

    Education and Training

    MD: Baylor College of Medicine.

    Residency: Boston Children’s Hospital.

    Training Fellowship: Boston Children’s Hospital.

    Board Certification: Pediatrics; Pediatric Infectious Diseases.

    A photo of Alan Jobe.

    Alan H. Jobe, MD, PhD
    Director, Division of Perinatal Biology

    513-636-8563

    alan.jobe@cchmc.org

    Alan H. Jobe, MD, PhD

    Director, Division of Perinatal Biology

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-8563

    Fax: 513-636-8691

    Email: alan.jobe@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Clinical trials in neonatology; bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    Research Interests

    Lung maturation and lung injury in the fetus and newborn; use of antenatal corticosteroids; lung injury with ventilation of the preterm

    Education and Training

    MD: University of California, San Diego, 1973. 

    PhD: University of California, San Diego, CA, 1973. 

    Residency: University Hospital, University of California, San Diego, CA, 1974 to 1975.

    Fellowship: University of California, San Diego, CA, 1975 to 1977.

    Board Certified: Pediatrics and Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine.

    Publications

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    Grants

    Mechanisms of Fetal Inflammatory Response Syndrome Induced by Chorioamnionitis. Co-Investigator. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Feb 2009 - Feb 2014.
    A photo of Richard Lang.

    Richard A. Lang, PhD
    Director of the Visual Systems Group

    513-636-2700

    richard.lang@cchmc.org

    Richard A. Lang, PhD

    Director of the Visual Systems Group

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-2700

    Fax: 513-803-0740

    Email: richard.lang@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Wnt Ligands in Tumorigenesis; Vascular Regression and Tissue Regeneration; Lens Induction and Morphogenesis 

    Visit the Lang Lab.

    Education and Training

    BSc: 1984 (with honors), University of Melbourne, Australia. Co-major in genetics and biochemistry.

    PhD: 1988, University of Melbourne, Australia, at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research under Drs. AR Dunn and TJ Gonda.

    Postdoctoral Fellow: 1989-92, The G.W. Hooper Research Foundation, University of California, San Francisco under Dr. JM Bishop. Studied the role of the macrophage in developmentally programmed tissue remodeling.

    Publications

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    Grants

    Rho GTPases in early eye development. National Institute of Health. Apr 2007- Mar 2012. #R01 EY017848. 

    Macrophage and tumor angiogenesis. Co-Principal Investigator. National Institute of Health. Dec 2007- Nov 2012. #R01 CA131270.

    Targeting Survival Factors for Ocular Neovascularization. National Institute of Health. Apr 2008- Mar 2012. #R01 EY012609.

    CRIM1-β-catenin-Cadherin interactions in Eye Development and Disease. MPI with Dr. Rashmi Hegde of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. National Institute of Health. Apr 2009- Mar 2014. #R01 EY019377.

    Sox2 and Pax6 in Eye development. Co-Principal Investigator. US-Israel Binational Science Foundation.  
    Feb 2009- Jan 2013. 

    Eyes absent phosphatase inhibitors in eye disease. MPI with Dr. Rashmi Hegde of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. National Institute of Health. Apr 2009- Mar 2014. #R21 EY019125.

    A photo of Timothy LeCras, PhD.

    Timothy D. LeCras, PhD
    Director of Admissions, Molecular & Developmental Biology Graduate Program

    513-636-8151

    tim.lecras@cchmc.org

    Timothy D. LeCras, PhD

    Director of Admissions, Molecular & Developmental Biology Graduate Program

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-8151

    Fax: 513-636-7868

    Email: tim.lecras@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Lung development; bronchopulmonary dysplasia; pulmonary hypertension; asthma; pulmonary fibrosis

    Biography

    Timothy LeCras, PhD, investigates the causes of chronic lung diseases, including pulmonary hypertension, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, pulmonary fibrosis, and asthma. The goal of his laboratory is to use this knowledge to identify therapeutic targets and preventative measures. Our efforts are aided by very productive collaborations with other groups at Cincinnati Children’s as well as other groups in the U.S.

    Education and Training

    Postdoctoral fellow: University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 1993-1996.

    PhD: University of Cambridge, UK, 1988-1992.

    BSc: Biochemistry, Brunel University, London, UK, 1983-1987.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Jeffery Molkentin, PhD.

    Jeffery D. Molkentin, PhD
    Professor | Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator

    513-636-3557

    jeff.molkentin@cchmc.org

    Jeffery D. Molkentin, PhD

    Professor | Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-3557

    Fax: 513-636-5958

    Email: jeff.molkentin@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Biography

    Dr. Molkentin's research aims to understand the intracellular signaling pathways and transcriptional regulatory circuits that control mammalian cell growth and differentiation. His work has advanced the understanding of molecular events behind heart disease and muscular dystrophy.

    In 2008 he was named a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigator.

    For a full description of Dr. Molkentin's work, please see his Faculty Lab Site in the Division of Molecular and Cardiovascular Biology.

    Education and Training

    BS Marquette University, Milwaukee WI, 1989.

    PhD: Medical College of Wisconsin, 1994.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    S. Steven Potter, PhD

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4850

    Fax: 513-636-4317

    Email: steve.potter@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Kidney development and disease; Hox genes; craniofacial development; creation of an atlas of global gene expression patterns in the multiple compartments of the developing kidney; analysis of perturbed gene expression patterns in the kidney glomeruli of patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis; craniofacial development using mutant mice, laser capture microdissection, next generation sequencing, and microarrays; recombineering to target multiple Hox genes at once

    Visit the Potter Lab.

    Education and Training

    BA: University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), 1971.

    PhD: University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1976.

    Postdoctoral Fellowship: Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. 1976-1978.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Jeffrey Robbins, PhD.

    Jeffrey Robbins, PhD
    Director and Endowed Chair, Molecular Cardiovascular Biology

    513-636-8098

    jeffrey.robbins@cchmc.org

    Jeffrey Robbins, PhD

    Director and Endowed Chair, Molecular Cardiovascular Biology

    Executive Co-Director, Heart Institute

    Associate Chair, Children's Hospital Research Foundation

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-8098

    Email: jeffrey.robbins@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Structure function relationships for the contractile proteins;  cardiac-specific gene manipulation in transgenic rabbits; the contractile protein myosin, and human heart failure; molecular studies of human valve disease

    Visit the Robbins Lab.

    Biography

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Cardiac Signaling in the Normal and Abnormal Heart. Principal Investigator. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Jun 2002 - Nov 2012.  #P01HL69779.

    Cardiomyocyte Toxicity and Heart Failure in Desmin Related Cardiomyopathy. Principal Investigator. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Jan 2008 - Dec 2012. #R01 HL087862.


    A photo of Marc Rothenberg, MD, PhD.

    Marc E. Rothenberg, MD, PhD
    Director, Division of Allergy and Immunology

    513-803-0257

    marc.rothenberg@cchmc.org

    Marc E. Rothenberg, MD, PhD

    Director, Division of Allergy and Immunology

    Director, Cincinnati Center for Eosinophilic Disorders

    Program Director, CHRCDA (K12)

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-0257

    Fax: 513-636-3310

    Email: marc.rothenberg@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Eosinophilia; eosinophilic disorders; asthma; allergy; food allergy

    Research Interests

    Eosinophils; chemokines

    Visit the Rothenberg Lab.

    Biography

    Marc E. Rothenberg, MD, PhD, is the Director of the Division of Allergy and Immunology at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, and a tenured Professor of Pediatrics at Cincinnati Children’s and the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He graduated summa cum laude with Highest Honors in Chemistry and Biochemistry from Brandeis University. He then matriculated at Harvard Medical School in the combined MD / PhD program. His PhD under the mentorship of Dr. Frank Austen included seminal studies on eosinophil hematopoiesis, as he developed the first culture system for human eosinophils.

    After completing a two-year residency in pediatrics at Children’s Hospital in Boston, Dr. Rothenberg did a combined fellowship in allergy / immunology and hematology at Children’s Hospital in Boston. During this fellowship program, Dr. Rothenberg did post-doctorate training in the genetics laboratory of Dr. Philip Leder at Harvard Medical School, where he cloned the eotaxin chemokine. After being on faculty of Harvard Medical School for one year, he came to the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children's, one of the largest pediatric medical and research centers in the United States. He is actively involved in managing a research program focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms of allergic disorders. At Cincinnati Children’s, he has helped build a top program in pediatric research, and his division is a leader in pediatric allergy and immunology. In addition, he sees patients suffering from allergic and immunological diseases from around the world as part of the Cincinnati Center for Eosinophilic Disorders that he directs.

    Dr. Rothenberg’s awards include the Pharmacia Allergy Research Foundation Award for the best young investigator in the allergy field; the Young Investigator Award and the Scholar in Allergy Award from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology; the Ohio Governor’s Recognition Award; the 2007 E Mead Johnson Award from the Society of Pediatric Research; and an NIH MERIT Award in 2010 from the NIAID. He is an elected member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation, Society for Pediatric Research, and a Diplomate of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

    Among his extensive publications of more than 250 articles on molecular mechanisms of allergic responses, Dr. Rothenberg edited a book entitled, “Chemokines in Allergic Disease”. He has served on various review panels for journals and grant agencies including the National Institutes of Health, where he served on the Advisory Council of the NIAID, Burroughs Trust, and the Medical Research Council of the UK. His research has been supported by numerous sources including the National Institutes of Health, the USA Department of Defense, Human Frontier Science Program Organization, the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, the Dana Foundation, and the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network.

    Visit the Rothenberg Lab website

    Education and Training

    MD, PhD: Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA, 1990.

    Residency: Pediatrics, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, 1991-1992.

    Fellowship: Immunology / Allergy, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, 1992-1994; Hematology / Oncology, Children's Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, 1992-1995.

    Certification: National Board of Medical Examiners, 1991; Board of Registration in Medicine, MA, 1992; American Board of Pediatrics, 1995, 2001, 2008; Ohio State Medical Board, 1997; American Board of Allergy and Immunology, 1997, 2006.

    Publications

    Grants

    NICHHD Pediatric Center for Gene Expression and Developmental Sciences. Program Director. National Institutes of Health. 2007-2011. K12 HD028827.

    IL-13 and Eosinophilic Esophagitis. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health.  2007-2012. R01 DK076893.

    Genetics of Eosinophilic Esophagitis. Principal Investigator. Department of Defense. 2010-2012. DOD W81XWH1010167. 

    Resistin-like Molecules in the Lung. Co-Principal Investigator. US-Israel Binational Science Foundation. 2010-2012. #2009222. 

    IL-13 Associated Eosinophil Lung Responses. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. 2009-2014. R01 AI083450.

    Regulation of Gastrointestinal Eosinophils. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. 2009-2014. R37 AI045898. 

    A photo of Dr. Arnold Strauss.

    Arnold W. Strauss, MD
    BK Rachford Professor and Chair, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

    513-636-2942

    arnold.strauss@cchmc.org

    Arnold W. Strauss, MD

    BK Rachford Professor and Chair, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

    Director, Cincinnati Children's Research Foundation

    Chief Medical Officer, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-2942

    Email: arnold.strauss@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Pediatric cardiology; genetic basis of pediatric heart disease

    Biography

    Arnold Strauss, MD, joined Cincinnati Children's in April, 2007, as chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at the UC College of Medicine, chief medical officer of Cincinnati Children's and director of the Cincinnati Children's Research Foundation. He is the seventh B.K. Rachford Memorial Chair in Pediatrics.

    Dr. Strauss is a distinguished pediatric cardiologist, scientist, educator and leader. Prior to his arrival at Cincinnati Children's, he was the chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and medical director of the Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, a position he held from 2000 to 2007. Under his leadership, the university built and opened a new hospital for children, expanded its pediatric faculty and increased grant funding for pediatric research. From 1981 to 2000, Strauss was director of the Division of Pediatric Cardiology at Washington University/St. Louis Children's Hospital.

    A respected scientist, Dr. Strauss' research focuses on understanding the molecular basis of disorders of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and the genetic causes of congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathies. He is the recipient of two of the most prestigious awards in research. In November 2006 he was awarded the American Heart Association's Basic Science Research Award for groundbreaking work that led to finding genetic defects that can cause heart failure and sudden death in infants and children. In 1991 he received the E. Mead Johnson Award for Excellence in Pediatric Research.

    Education and Training

    MD: Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, 1970.

    Residency: Pediatrics, Children's Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri, 1970-72.

    Fellowship: Cardiology, Children's Hospital and Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, 1972-75.

    Postdoctoral Fellowship: Merck, Sharp and Dohme Research Laboratories, Rahway, New Jersey, 1975-77.

    Publications

    Liebig M, Schymik I, Mueller M, Wendel U, Mayatepek E, Ruiter J, Strauss AW, Wanders RJ, Spiekerkoetter U. (2006) Neonatal screening for very long-chain acyl-coA dehydrogenase deficiency: enzymatic and molecular evaluation of neonates with elevated C14:1-carnitine levels. Pediatrics 118:1065-9.

    Khuchua Z, Yue Z, Batts L, Strauss AW. (2006) A zebrafish model of human Barth syndrome reveals the essential role of tafazzin in cardiac development and function. Circ Res 99:201-8.

    Exil VJ, Gardner CD, Rottman JN, Sims H, Bartelds B, Khuchua Z, Sindhal R, Ni G, Strauss AW. (2006) Abnormal mitochondrial bioenergetics and heart rate dysfunction in mice lacking very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 290:H1289-97.

    Bennett MJ, Russell LK, Tokunaga C, Narayan SB, Tan L, Seegmiller A, Boriack RL, Strauss AW. (2006) Reye-like syndrome resulting from novel missense mutations in mitochondrial medium- and short-chain l-3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Mol Genet Metab 89:74-9.

    Strauss AW. (2005) Surprising? Perhaps not. Long-chain fatty acid oxidation during human fetal development. Pediatr Res 57:753-4.

    Spiekerkoetter U, Tokunaga C, Wendel U, Mayatepek E, Ijlst L, Vaz FM, van Vlies N, Overmars H, Duran M, Wijburg FA, Wanders RJ, Strauss AW. (2005) Tissue carnitine homeostasis in very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient mice. Pediatr Res 57:760-4.

    Shekhawat PS, Matern D, Strauss AW. (2005) Fetal fatty acid oxidation disorders, their effect on maternal health and neonatal outcome: impact of expanded newborn screening on their diagnosis and management. Pediatr Res 57:78R-86R.

    Djouadi F, Aubey F, Schlemmer D, Ruiter JP, Wanders RJ, Strauss AW, Bastin J. (2005) Bezafibrate increases very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase protein and mRNA expression in deficient fibroblasts and is a potential therapy for fatty acid oxidation disorders. Hum Mol Genet 14:2695-703.

    Browning MF, Larson C, Strauss A, Marsden DL. (2005) Normal acylcarnitine levels during confirmation of abnormal newborn screening in long-chain fatty acid oxidation defects. J Inherit Metab Dis 28:545-50.

    Strauss AW. (2004) Tandem mass spectrometry in discovery of disorders of the metabolome. J Clin Invest 113:354-6.

    Spierkerkoetter U, Khuchua Z, Yue Z, Strauss AW. (2004) The early-onset phenotype of mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency: a lethal disorder with multiple tissue involvement. J Inherit Metab Dis 27:294-6.

    Spiekerkoetter U, Tokunaga C, Wendel U, Mayatepek E, Exil V, Duran M, Wijburg FA, Wanders RJ, Strauss AW. (2004) Changes in blood carnitine and acylcarnitine profiles of very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient mice subjected to stress. Eur J Clin Invest 34:191-6.

    Spiekerkoetter U, Khuchua Z, Yue Z, Bennett MJ, Strauss AW. (2004) General mitochondrial trifunctional protein (TFP) deficiency as a result of either alpha- or beta-subunit mutations exhibits similar phenotypes because mutations in either subunit alter TFP complex expression and subunit turnover. Pediatr Res 55:190-6.

    Spiekerkoetter U, Bennett MJ, Ben-Zeev B, Strauss AW, Tein I. (2004) Peripheral neuropathy, episodic myoglobinuria, and respiratory failure in deficiency of the mitochondrial trifunctional protein. Muscle Nerve 29:66-72.

    McKinney JT, Longo N, Hahn SH, Matern D, Rinaldo P, Strauss AW, Dobrowolski SF. (2004) Rapid, comprehensive screening of the human medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase gene. Mol Genet Metab 82:112-20.

    Strauss A, Lock JE. (2003) Pediatric cardiomyopathy--a long way to go. N Engl J Med 348:1703-5.

    Spiekerkoetter U, Sun B, Zytkovicz T, Wanders R, Strauss AW, Wendel U. (2003) MS/MS-based newborn and family screening detects asymptomatic patients with very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. J Pediatr 143:335-42.

    Spiekerkoetter U, Sun B, Khuchua Z, Bennett MJ, Strauss AW. (2003) Molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity in mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency due to beta-subunit mutations. Hum Mutat 21:598-607.

    Shekhawat P, Bennett MJ, Sadovsky Y, Nelson DM, Rakheja D, Strauss AW. (2003) Human placenta metabolizes fatty acids: implications for fetal fatty acid oxidation disorders and maternal liver diseases. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 284:E1098-105.

    Khuchua Z, Wozniak DF, Bardgett ME, Yue Z, McDonald M, Boero J, Hartman RE, Sims H, Strauss AW. (2003) Deletion of the N-terminus of murine map2 by gene targeting disrupts hippocampal ca1 neuron architecture and alters contextual memory. Neuroscience 119:101-11.

    Exil VJ, Roberts RL, Sims H, McLaughlin JE, Malkin RA, Gardner CD, Ni G, Rottman JN, Strauss AW. (2003) Very-long-chain acyl-coenzyme a dehydrogenase deficiency in mice. Circ Res 93:448-55.

    Zytkovicz TH, Fitzgerald EF, Marsden D, Larson CA, Shih VE, Johnson DM, Strauss AW, Comeau AM, Eaton RB, Grady GF. (2001) Tandem mass spectrometric analysis for amino, organic, and fatty acid disorders in newborn dried blood spots: a two-year summary from the New England Newborn Screening Program. Clin Chem 47:1945-55.

    Ibdah JA, Paul H, Zhao Y, Binford S, Salleng K, Cline M, Matern D, Bennett MJ, Rinaldo P, Strauss AW. (2001) Lack of mitochondrial trifunctional protein in mice causes neonatal hypoglycemia and sudden death. J Clin Invest 107:1403-9.

    Barycki JJ, O'Brien LK, Strauss AW, Banaszak LJ. (2000) Sequestration of the active site by interdomain shifting. Crystallographic and spectroscopic evidence for distinct conformations of L-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. J Biol Chem 275:27186-96.

    Ibdah JA, Bennett MJ, Rinaldo P, Zhao Y, Gibson B, Sims HF, Strauss AW. (1999) A fetal fatty-acid oxidation disorder as a cause of liver disease in pregnant women. N Engl J Med 340:1723-31.


    A photo of Bruce Trapnell.

    Bruce C. Trapnell, MS, MD
    Assistant Director, Adult Cystic Fibrosis Center

    513-636-6361

    bruce.trapnell@cchmc.org

    Bruce C. Trapnell, MS, MD

    Assistant Director, Adult Cystic Fibrosis Center

    Attending Physician

    Pulmonologist - Research, Adult Clinical, Division of Pulmonary Medicine

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-6361

    Fax: 513-636-3723

    Email: bruce.trapnell@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; cystic fibrosis; alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency; other rare lung disorders

    Research Interests

    Alveolar macrophage function; molecular techniques using gene knockout, transgenic and conditional gene expression mouse models and non-human primates, in vitro and in vivo viral gene transfer, and bone marrow transplantation

    Biography

    Bruce Trapnell, MS, MD received his medical degree from the University of Maryland in 1985, and completed a medical residency at The Ohio State University Hospitals and a fellowship in pulmonary medicine at the Clinical Center of the National Institutes of health, where he then served as Senior Attending Physician. Subsequently, he established the Division of Pulmonary and Virology Studies at Genetic Therapy, Inc., a subsidiary of Novartis, Pharma, serving as Vice President before joining Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, where he is now Full Professor.

    Dr. Trapnell has conducted lung disease research since his training and has been continuously funded by the NIH since 2001, shortly after his arrival in Cincinnati. He has published over 90 original articles and has trained more than 16 post-doctoral fellows. Dr. Trapnell’s research interests are focused to the pathogenesis and therapy of rare lung diseases and mechanisms by which GM-CSF regulates innate immunity and lung host defense.

    Dr. Trapnell is Director of Cincinnati’s Cystic Fibrosis Therapeutics Development Network Center, Assistant Director of the Adult Cystic Fibrosis Care Center, Director of the Rare Lung Diseases Clinical Research Consortium, Scientific Director of the Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis Foundation. Dr. Trapnell is the past Scientific Director of the Alpha-1 Foundation, for which he organized and directed the grant program for eight years.

    Education and Training

    MS: Genetics, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, 1981.

    MD:
    University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 1984.

    Residency: Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University Hospitals, Columbus, OH, 1987.

    Fellowship: Pulmonary Medicine, Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 1989.

    Certification: Diplomate in Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine, 1987; Diplomate, National Board of Medical Examiners, 1987; Diplomate in Pulmonary Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine, 2000 .

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Role of Anti-GM-CSF Antibodies in Myeloid Cell Function & Innate Immunity. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Apr 2007 - Mar 2012. #R01 HL085453-01A1. 
    A photo of Timothy Weaver.

    Timothy E. Weaver, MS, PhD
    Co-Director, Division of Pulmonary Biology

    513-636-7223

    tim.weaver@cchmc.org

    Timothy E. Weaver, MS, PhD

    Co-Director, Division of Pulmonary Biology

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-7223

    Fax: 513-636-7868

    Email: tim.weaver@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Chronic lung disease; air-blood barrier; identification of cytoprotective pathways

    Visit the Weaver Lab.

    Biography

    The goals of Dr. Timothy Weaver's work are to understand the structural basis for surfactant protein function and to identify the roles of these proteins in lung development and postnatal pulmonary physiology. These goals are achieved by expressing mutated/deleted surfactant protein transgenes in knockout mice and evaluating pathophysiologic changes associated with a specific mutation or loss of functional domain.

    Dr. Weaver is a recipient of the prestigious MERIT award from the National Institutes of Health, NIH, and his research is supported by multiple grants from the NIH.

    Profile

    Read a profile about Dr. Weaver and the work he does in the Fall 2003 issue of Research Highlights.

    Education and Training

    BS: Biology, Bob Jones University, Greenville, South Carolina, 1975.

    MS: Embryology, Hahnemann Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1979.

    PhD:
    Developmental Biology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1983.

    Postdoc: Molecular Biology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1986.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Role of SFTPC in Pathogenesis of Interstitial Lung Disease. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Dec 2008 - Nov 2013. #R56-AI/HL086492.

    A photo of Jeffrey Whitsett.

    Jeffrey A. Whitsett, MD
    Co-Director, Perinatal Institute

    513-803-2790

    jeffrey.whitsett@cchmc.org

    Jeffrey A. Whitsett, MD

    Co-Director, Perinatal Institute

    Chief, Section of Neonatology, Perinatal and Pulmonary Biology

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-2790

    Fax: 513-636-7868

    Email: jeffrey.whitsett@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Cystic fibrosis research; lung morphogenesis; control of gene expression in the respiratory epithelium; gene delivery and therapy 

    Visit the Whitsett Lab.

    Biography

    Jeffrey A. Whitsett, MD, is chief of the Section of Neonatology, Perinatal and Pulmonary Biology at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

    Dr. Whitsett received his medical degree from Columbia University, in New York, and has been a faculty member since 1977. He is internationally known for his research in pulmonary medicine, as well as for his clinical expertise in neonatology.

    Dr. Whitsett has made a series of groundbreaking contributions in pulmonary medicine. His major pioneering work has been on surfactant proteins A, B, C and D, cloning their genes, and clarifying their roles in lung development.

    Throughout his career, Dr. Whitsett has had the remarkable ability to move from molecular biology, to animal models, to diagnosis and therapy of human disease. He played a critical role in making surfactant protein replacement a routine tool for treating immature lungs and respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants. His laboratory has contributed to the identification of a number of genes critical for lung formation and function. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis were shown to cause acute and chronic lung disease in infants and adults.

    Dr. Whitsett is a member of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences and is the recipient of the Mead Johnson Award, a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Merit Award, the first Julius Comroe Lectureship in Pulmonary Research from FASEB, the William Cooper Procter Award from Cincinnati Children's, the Amberson Lecture Award of the American Thoracic Society, the prestigious Daniel Drake Medal for scientific contributions from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, the International Arvo Ylppö Medal from the Finnish Foundation for Pediatric Research and the Grand Hamdan International Award on Neonatal Medicine from the United Arab Emirates.

    Dr. Whitsett is the author of more than 400 papers in both the basic science and clinical literature.

    Education and Training

    MD: Columbia University, New York, NY, 1973.

    Residency: Pediatrics, Mt. Sinai Hospital, New York City, 1974 to 1976.

    Fellowship: Neonatology, Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 1976 to 1977.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Hector Wong.

    Hector R. Wong, MD
    Director, Critical Care Medicine

    513-636-4259

    hector.wong@cchmc.org

    Hector R. Wong, MD

    Director, Critical Care Medicine

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4259

    Fax: 513-636-4267

    Email: hector.wong@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Critical care; sepsis
    Visit the Wong Lab.

    Education and Training

    MD: University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ, 1989.

    Residency: Department of Pediatrics, George Washington University School of Medicine, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC, 1990 to 1992.

    Fellowship: Clinical Fellow, Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 1992 to 1995; Research Fellow, Department of Pharmacology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, 1992 to 1995.

    Certification: National Board of Medical Examiners, 1990; Diplomate, American Board of Pediatrics, 1993; American Board of Pediatrics: Sub-Board of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, 1996.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Point of care center for emerging neurotechnologies. Co-Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Sep 2007 - Jun 2012. #U54 EB007954.

    The pediatric sepsis biomarker risk model. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Oct 2009 - Sep 2012. #RC1 HL100474.

    Host response to trauma research training program. Co-program director. National Institutes of Health. Jul 2008 - Jun 2013. #T32 GM008478.

    The role of PPARγ and PPARγ agonists in septic shock. Co-Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Jul 2008 - Jun 2013. #RO1 GM067202.

    PPARγ in pediatric sepsis and the inflammatory response in obesity. Co-Mentor. National Institutes of Health. Jun 2010 - May 2014.

    MMP-8 as a novel therapeutic target in sepsis. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Apr 2011 - Mar 2015.


    A photo of Yi Zheng.

    Yi Zheng, PhD
    Director, Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology; Katherine Stewart Waters Endowed Chair

    513-636-0595

    yi.zheng@cchmc.org

    A photo of Yi Zheng.

    Yi Zheng, PhD

    Director, Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology; Katherine Stewart Waters Endowed Chair

    Co-Director, Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-0595

    Email: yi.zheng@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Research Interests

    Using transgenic and gene targeted mouse models to study the physiological and pathological roles of Rho GTPases and their regulators in hematopoiesis, neurogenesis, lung cancer development and small intestinal stem cell regulations; mechanism based, rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting Rho GTPase signaling modules and pathologic functions in cancer and blood diseases; mouse model studies of mTor signaling function in hematopoietic stem cells and small intestinal stem cells.

    Visit the Zheng Lab.

    Education and Training

    BS: Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, 1986.

    MS: Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 1988.

    PhD: Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 1991.

    Postdoctoral Fellow: Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 1995.

    Publications

    View All PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Rac GTPase specific small molecule inhibitors. PI: Yi Zheng. National Cancer Institute. NIH - R01 CA141341. 01/01/2000 - 01/31/2014

    Targeting Cdc42 in leukemia stem cells. PI: Yi Zheng, co-PI: James Mulloy. National Cancer Institute - 1R01CA150547-01. 04/01/2010 – 03/31/2015

    Cincinnati Center of Excellence in Molecular Hematology. PI: Yi Zheng. NIDDK - NIH P30 DK090971. 09/30/2010 – 06/30/2015

    Lineage Determination and Tissue Homeostasis in the aged Hematopoietic System. PI: Yi Zheng; co-PI: Hartmut Geiger. NIA - NIH R01AG040118. 08/01/2011 – 07/31/2016

    PHARMACOLOGICAL REJUVENATION OF AGED HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS. PI: Hartmut Geiger; co-PI: Yi Zheng. NIH - NIH R43 AG042986. 08/01/2012 – 07/31/2014

    Targeting Leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor LARG in AML. PI: Yi Zheng; co-PI: James Mulloy. Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation. 07/01/2013 – 06/30/2015

    A photo of Basilia Zingarelli.

    Basilia Zingarelli, MD, PhD
    Director, Basic Science Research

    513-636-8704

    basilia.zingarelli@cchmc.org

    Basilia Zingarelli, MD, PhD

    Director, Basic Science Research

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-8704

    Email: basilia.zingarelli@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Sepsis; trauma; hemorrhagic shock and ischemia and reperfusion injury.
    Visit the Zingarelli Lab.

    Biography

    Basilia Zingarelli, MD, PhD, came to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center in 1995 as a post-doctoral research fellow in Critical Care Medicine. She joined the faculty in 1997.

    Dr. Zingarelli graduated from the Medical School of the University of Messina in Italy in 1990. She also obtained a doctorate in experimental medicine in 1997 and attended a residency in medical toxicology at the University of Messina from 1990 to 1992.

    Dr. Zingarelli now directs the basic science research in the Division of Critical Care Medicine. She directs an NIH-funded research laboratory focused on the pathogenetic mechanisms of organ injury during sepsis, trauma and hemorrhage and coordinates basic science and clinical translational research projects related to other critical care conditions.

    Dr. Zingarelli serves on the Executive Council of the Shock Society, a well-established international association of clinical and research scientists in the field of shock and trauma, and serves as associate editor for the journal Shock. She also serves as permanent and ad hoc member on a number of study sections at the National Institutes of Health.

    Education and Training

    MD: School of Medicine, University of Messina, Italy, 1990.

    PhD: Experimental Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Messina, Italy, 1997.

    Residency: Medical Toxicology, School of Medicine, University of Messina, Italy, 1990-1992.

    Certification: General Medicine (Italian), 1990.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Role of Eicosanoids In Shock. Co-Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Jul 2008 - Jun 2012. #R01 GM 027673.

    Mechanisms of Age-Related Inflammatory Response in Hemorrhagic Shock. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Sep 2007 - Aug 2012. #R01 AG 027990.

    Host response to trauma research training program. Faculty/mentor. National Institutes of Health (T32 GM08478). Jul 2003-Jun 2013.

    Interferon-mediated reprogramming of Toll-like receptor signaling. Co-Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Jul 2008 - Jun 2013. #R01 GM085063.

    Role of PPARgamma and PPARgamma Agonists in Septic Shock. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Jul 2008 - Jun 2013. #R01 GM 067202.

    MMP-8 as a novel therapeutic target in sepsis. Co-Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Jul 2011 - Jun 2015. #R01 GM096994.