Sumatriptan

(soo-ma-TRIP-tan)

Sumatriptan (Imitrex®) is used to relieve migraine headache symptoms. It is not used to prevent future migraine attacks. It is available as a tablet, nasal spray and injection.

This medicine should not be taken by anyone who has the following conditions:
  • Ischemic heart disease
  • Angina
  • Prinzmetal's angina
  • History of heart attack
  • History of stroke
  • Ischemic bowel disease
  • Intermittent claudication
  • Uncontrolled high blood pressure
  • Severe liver disease
  • Certain types of migraines

Additional important information:

  • Tell the physician if your child is pregnant before giving this medicine.
  • The injection should be given into the muscle as directed, not into the blood system.
  • Use the nasal spray as directed by the physician and package instructions. Ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist about proper use.
  • Swallow tablets whole. Do not crush.
  • Inform your child's doctor or pharmacist about any prescription medicines or any over-the-counter medicines that your child is taking, especially any monoamine oxidase inhibitors in the last 14 days, or any other medicine used to treat a migraine in the last 24 hours.
  • Do not use after the expiration date on the bottle/package.
  • Keep this medicine out of the reach of children.
  • If too much medication is taken by accident, call the Drug and Poison Information Center (DPIC) at 513-636-5111, or 1-800-222-1222, or call your child's doctor immediately.

For any medication information about your child's dosing schedule and/or missed doses, call the healthcare provider who prescribed the medication.

  • Sleepiness
  • Dizziness
  • Numbness
  • Nausea/vomiting
  • Tingling, warm sensation with flushing
  • Chest tightness, pressure, or heaviness immediately after the dose
  • Bad taste
  • Pain at injection site
  • Tightness in the chest that doesn't go away
  • Swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat
  • No relief of headache
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Shortness of breath
  • Extreme tiredness, fainting, or dizziness
  • Rash

Last Updated 12/2013