Nephrology and Hypertension

Division Details

Division Data Summary

Research and Training Details

Number of Faculty10
Direct Annual Grant Support$1,948,472
Direct Annual Industry Support$356,055
Peer Reviewed Publications75

Clinical Activities and Training

Number of Clinical Fellows6
Inpatient Encounters3,097
Outpatient Encounters5,049

Division Photo

Group photo of the Division of Nephrology and Hypertension

Row 1: D Claes, N Xiao, H Shin, M Mitsnefes, S Menon

Row 2: M Bennett, J Bissler, L Pleasant, S Goldstein, P Devarajan

Row 3: D Hooper, R VanDeVoorde, B Dixon, J Goebel, E Nehus

Significant Accomplishments

Significant Accomplishments

NIH Pediatric Center of Excellence in Nephrology

Prasad Devarajan, MD, director of Nephrology and Hypertension, was awarded a prestigious five-year, $3.7 million Center of Excellence (P50) grant by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Ours is one of only three such centers that were funded. The Center will fund groundbreaking translational research projects in three areas of unmet need, including acute kidney injury, nephrotic syndrome, and lupus kidney disease. It will bring together investigators performing cutting-edge bench-to-bedside research from several divisions within Cincinnati Children’s, including Nephrology, Cardiology, Critical Care, Rheumatology, Developmental Biology, and Bone Marrow Transplant. The Center will include funding for innovative Research Cores in Genomics, Proteomics, and Biomarker Development, to support the primary focus areas. The Center will also incorporate an Administrative Core, and an Enrichment Core for the training of future pediatric nephrology researchers.

Nephrology Clinical Laboratory launches new tests for atypical HUS

Hemolytic uremic syndrome, or HUS, is a serious disease that can lead to kidney failure and even death. Some forms of HUS (known as atypical HUS) are associated with defects in the regulation of the complement system, a portion of the immune system, and are even more lethal if not correctly identified and treated. After caring for several patients with atypical HUS for whom the testing required sending samples to other institutions, taking weeks and even months to complete, Bradley Dixon, MD, wanted to make identification of these atypical forms of HUS easier and faster. He developed several blood tests to rapidly evaluate such patients, which have now been launched by the Nephrology Clinical Laboratory. These tests can quickly assay for the most common causes of atypical HUS, identify conditions that can closely resemble atypical HUS, and help clinicians rapidly treat the disease to improve patient outcomes. The Clinical Laboratory has already become a regional resource for HUS testing in the Tri-state area, and remains a national leader in performing unique tests for the diagnosis of other complement disorders, acute kidney injury, and chronic kidney disease.

Nephrology Research leads to FDA Approval of New Drug for Tuberous Sclerosis

April 29, 2012 was a very good day for patients with a tumor predisposition syndrome called tuberous sclerosis complex. People affected with this disease develop renal tumors called angiomyolipomata. Until this last April, only surgery or endovascular procedures could help control individual tumors; however, many patients have bilateral, multifocal kidney involvement that was previously untreatable. Work pioneered here, including an eleven-country, placebo-controlled trial led by John Bissler, MD, has changed the outcome for these patients. The trial demonstrated that the drug Everolimus caused significant shrinkage of the renal tumors in patients suffering from tuberous sclerosis renal disease. The significance of these findings led the Food and Drug Administration to approve Everolimus for the treatment of patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. In the recent Tuberous Sclerosis Consensus Conference, Everolimus was recommended as the first line of therapy for these tumors. This represents the first approved drug that can alter the progressive nature of these tumors, and offers new hope for patients with Tuberous Sclerosis renal disease.

Division Highlights

Another banner year for the Kidney Transplant Team

The multi-disciplinary Kidney Transplant Center at Cincinnati Children's has been in existence since 1965, and has performed over 500 kidney transplants in children. Recent years have seen an explosion of activities, thanks to novel protocols that optimize the care of children with the most complex malformations, antibody-mediated rejection and BK virus nephropathy. Despite the complexity, Cincinnati Children's kidney transplant program, directed by Dr. Jens Goebel, continues to achieve patient and graft survival rates that are at or above the national benchmarks, while the lengths of stay for the initial transplant surgery are shorter than the national average. These successes have now established our program as one of the premier transplant centers in the Midwest, and more than half of our patients come from distant cities and states. We now perform 20-25 kidney transplants each year, which places us within the top five busiest pediatric kidney transplant centers in the country. During the past year, we performed our first combined heart-kidney transplant successfully, with an excellent outcome. We also performed successful kidney transplants for several fetal care center “graduates” who had prenatal interventions for severe developmental anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract. In addition, Dr. David Hooper has led the transformation of our kidney transplant program to comprehensively track and improve outcomes for our patients. We have standardize the measurement, reporting, and classification of blood pressure by RN’s and MD’s across 6 clinic locations in addition to prototyping, refining and implementing a sophisticated visit planning process that includes decision support. We also started the first dedicated kidney transplant clinic. These interventions have contributed to an increase in the percentage of patients in our population with controlled blood pressure from under 50% to nearly 70%.

A continued surge of infants at the Dialysis Center

The Dialysis Unit at Cincinnati Children's, directed by Dr. Rene Vandevoorde, is among the 10 largest in the country. By far the most challenging and complex dialysis patients are infants. Over the past couple of years, this extremely demanding population has exploded, and we now care for several infants on home dialysis. The majority of these infants have come from outside the Cincinnati area, many referred via our Fetal Care program and others because of lack of complex dialysis expertise at their home institutions. The care of these infants is optimized through a coordination of services orchestrated by the dialysis unit, bringing together their medical, surgical, nutritional, developmental, and psychosocial needs. New policies for aggressive feeding, hormonal, and dialytic treatments have already resulted in improved physical and mental development, and earlier kidney transplantation. Such initiatives have assured optimal care and set best practice care standards for this unique dialysis population.

An enormously successful year for the new Center for Acute Care Nephrology

The incidence of acute kidney injury has reached epidemic proportions globally, afflicting one third of critically ill children and often resulting in death or chronic kidney disease. Stemming the tide requires a concerted effort to develop optimal care for patients with or at risk for acute kidney injury. These urgent needs led to the launch of the Center for Acute Care Nephrology (CACN) in 2010, a collaborative effort between Nephrology, the Heart Institute, and Critical Care, directed by Dr. Stuart Goldstein. Our clinical accomplishments have included launching the first in-house consultative acute Pheresis Service, implementation of early proactive peritoneal dialysis in children at risk for acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery, development of intra-operative plasmapheresis for Heart Institute patients with high antibody sensitization undergoing heart transplantation, and implementation of the Nephrotoxic Medication Associated Injury Negated by Just In Time Action (NephroNINJA) project which has led to the avoidance of 900 days of nephrotoxic medication associated acute kidney injury days annually.

Expert and unique care for children and adults with Tuberous Sclerosis

We have now established the largest referral center for the management of kidney manifestations of tuberous sclerosis in the country. Under the leadership of Dr. John Bissler, we perform innovative embolization techniques for renal angiomyolipomas that complicate tuberous sclerosis, and have pioneered the use of steroid therapy to minimize post-embolization complications.

Significant Publications

Pai AL, Rausch J, Tackett A, Marsolo K, Drotar D, Goebel J. System for integrated adherence monitoring: real-time non-adherence risk assessment in pediatric kidney transplantation. Pediatr Transplant. 2012 Jun;16(4):329-34.
In this manuscript, which was accompanied by an editorial, we reported for the first time how a combined approach of using self-report, electronic pill bottle monitoring, and calculated standard deviation of drug trough levels can be used to predict medication adherence in school-age kidney transplant recipients.
Hooper DK, Fukuda T, Gardiner R, Logan B, Roy-Chaudhury A, Kirby CL, Vinks AA, Goebel J. Risk of tacrolimus toxicity in CYP3A5 nonexpressors treated with intravenous nicardipine after kidney transplantation. Transplantation. 2012 Apr 27;93(8):806-12.
This is the first manuscript to characterize the risk of a potentially toxic drug interaction in kidney transplant recipients with a common genotype who are treated simultaneously with intravenous nicardipine and tacrolimus. We also demonstrated that some large pediatric transplant programs are prescribing this drug combination in over 30% of their patients, suggesting the potential to change clinical practice and avoid tacrolimus over-exposure in a significant portion of patients.
Dixon BP, Henry J, Siroky BJ, Chu A, Groen PA, Bissler JJ. Cell cycle control and DNA damage response of conditionally immortalized urothelial cells. PLoS One. 2011 Jan 28;6(1):e16595.
This manuscript describes a new cell line originating from the lining of the bladder of a genetically modified mouse that can be grown in culture. The unique aspect of this cell line is that it can be grown in culture indefinitely under one set of conditions (“immortalized” cells), but by slightly adjusting these growth conditions, the cells behave more like normal bladder cells. When they behave more like normal bladder cells, these cells are able to sense when their DNA is damaged, and activate the appropriate responses to this damage. This work will allow researchers to study the development of bladder cancer in a normal bladder cell population, as well as to study how to correct severe birth defects involving the bladder experienced by some children.
Moffett BS, Goldstein SL. Acute kidney injury and increasing nephrotoxic-medication exposure in noncritically-ill children. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2011 Apr;6(4):856-63.
This is the first manuscript to describe the complete epidemiology of nephrotoxic medication associated acute kidney injury in children, demonstrating a doubling of AKI rates when children are exposed to 3 or more nephrotoxins. This finding serves as the foundation for identifying patients at risk, which is of major significance for improving outcomes of children by optimizing their medication exposure and decreasing acute kidney injury.
Nehus E, Furth S, Warady B, Mitsnefes M. Correlates of resistin in children with chronic kidney disease: the chronic kidney disease in children cohort. J Pediatr. 2012 Aug;161(2):276-80.
This is the first study to demonstrate that serum resistin is involved in the inflammatory milieu present in children with chronic kidney disease, therefore identifying resistin as potential biomarker that can be used to improve cardiovascular outcomes in this population.

Division Publications

  1. Abraham BP, Frazier EA, Morrow WR, Blaszak RT, Devarajan P, Mitsnefes M, Bryant JC, Sachdeva R. Cystatin C and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin as markers of renal function in pediatric heart transplant recipients. Pediatr Transplant. 2011; 15:564-9.
  2. Arikan AA, Zappitelli M, Goldstein SL, Naipaul A, Jefferson LS, Loftis LL. Fluid overload is associated with impaired oxygenation and morbidity in critically ill children. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2012; 13:253-8.
  3. Askenazi DJ, Goldstein SL. Renal Conditions. Manual of Neonatal Care. Philadephia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2011:350-376.
  4. Askenazi DJ, Koralkar R, Levitan EB, Goldstein SL, Devarajan P, Khandrika S, Mehta RL, Ambalavanan N. Baseline values of candidate urine acute kidney injury biomarkers vary by gestational age in premature infants. Pediatr Res. 2011; 70:302-6.
  5. Askenazi DJ, Montesanti A, Hunley H, Koralkar R, Pawar P, Shuaib F, Liwo A, Devarajan P, Ambalavanan N. Urine biomarkers predict acute kidney injury and mortality in very low birth weight infants. J Pediatr. 2011; 159:907-12 e1.
  6. Bagshaw SM, Haase M, Haase-Fielitz A, Bennett M, Devarajan P, Bellomo R. A prospective evaluation of urine microscopy in septic and non-septic acute kidney injury. Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2012; 27:582-8.
  7. Basu RK, Donaworth E, Wheeler DS, Devarajan P, Wong HR. Antecedent acute kidney injury worsens subsequent endotoxin-induced lung inflammation in a two-hit mouse model. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2011; 301:F597-604.
  8. Basu RK, Standage SW, Cvijanovich NZ, Allen GL, Thomas NJ, Freishtat RJ, Anas N, Meyer K, Checchia PA, Lin R, Shanley TP, Bigham MT, Wheeler DS, Devarajan P, Goldstein SL, Wong HR. Identification of candidate serum biomarkers for severe septic shock-associated kidney injury via microarray. Crit Care. 2011; 15:R273.
  9. Bennett MR, Piyaphanee N, Czech K, Mitsnefes M, Devarajan P. NGAL distinguishes steroid sensitivity in idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. Pediatr Nephrol. 2012; 27:807-12.
  10. Bissler JJ. Polycystic Kidney Disease. Clinician's Manual of Pediatric Nephrology. Singapore; Hackensack, NJ: World Scientific Publishing Co; 2011:703-712.
  11. Blinder JJ, Goldstein SL, Lee VV, Baycroft A, Fraser CD, Nelson D, Jefferies JL. Congenital heart surgery in infants: effects of acute kidney injury on outcomes. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2012; 143:368-74.
  12. Cavanaugh TM, Schoenemen H, Goebel J. The impact of sirolimus on sex hormones in male adolescent kidney recipients. Pediatr Transplant. 2012; 16:280-5.
  13. Coca SG, Jammalamadaka D, Sint K, Thiessen Philbrook H, Shlipak MG, Zappitelli M, Devarajan P, Hashim S, Garg AX, Parikh CR. Preoperative proteinuria predicts acute kidney injury in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2012; 143:495-502.
  14. Czech KA, Bennett M, Devarajan P. Distinct metalloproteinase excretion patterns in focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Pediatr Nephrol. 2011; 26:2179-84.
  15. Devarajan P. Acute Kidney Injury. Pediatric Nephrology: A Handbook for Training Health Care Providers. Singapore; Hackensack, NJ: World Scientific Publishing Co; 2011:159-194.
  16. Devarajan P. Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). Clinician's Manual of Pediatric Nephrology. Singapore; Hackensack, NJ: World Scientific Publishing Company; 2011:437-464.
  17. Faubel S, Chawla LS, Chertow GM, Goldstein SL, Jaber BL, Liu KD. Ongoing clinical trials in AKI. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2012; 7:861-73.
  18. Flynn JT, Pierce CB, Miller ER, 3rd, Charleston J, Samuels JA, Kupferman J, Furth SL, Warady BA. Reliability of resting blood pressure measurement and classification using an oscillometric device in children with chronic kidney disease. J Pediatr. 2012; 160:434-440 e1.
  19. Goebel J, DeFoor WR, Sheldon CA. Pediatric Kidney Transplantation. Clinician's Manual of Pediatric Nephrology. Singapore; Hackensack, NJ: World Scientific Publishing Co.; 2011:583-601.
  20. Goebel J, Pai A. Creating a monster: non-adherence underlying late transplant rejection. Pediatr Transplant. 2012; 16:312-4.
  21. Goldstein SL. Acute kidney injury in children and its potential consequences in adulthood. Blood Purif. 2012; 33:131-7.
  22. Goldstein SL. Therapeutic apheresis in children: special considerations. Semin Dial. 2012; 25:165-70.
  23. Goldstein SL. Acute kidney injury biomarkers: renal angina and the need for a renal troponin I. BMC Med. 2011; 9:135.
  24. Goldstein SL. Acute kidney injury in children: prevention, treatment and rehabilitation. Contrib Nephrol. 2011; 174:163-72.
  25. Goldstein SL. A novel use for novel acute kidney injury biomarkers: fenoldopam's effect on neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and cystatin C. Crit Care. 2011; 15:177.
  26. Goldstein SL, Klaus G, Friedman DF, Kim HC. Pediatric Therapeutic Apheresis. Pediatric Dialysis. New York: Springer; 2011:775-796.
  27. Goldstein SL, Klaus G, Friedman DF, Kim HC. Prescribing and Monitoring Hemodialysis. Pediatric Dialysis. New York: Springer; 2011:313-320.
  28. Haines HL, Laskin BL, Goebel J, Davies SM, Yin HJ, Lawrence J, Mehta PA, Bleesing JJ, Filipovich AH, Marsh RA, Jodele S. Blood, and not urine, BK viral load predicts renal outcome in children with hemorrhagic cystitis following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2011; 17:1512-9.
  29. Hooper DK, Fukuda T, Gardiner R, Logan B, Roy-Chaudhury A, Kirby CL, Vinks AA, Goebel J. Risk of tacrolimus toxicity in CYP3A5 nonexpressors treated with intravenous nicardipine after kidney transplantation. Transplantation. 2012; 93:806-12.
  30. Iyngkaran P, Schneider H, Devarajan P, Anavekar N, Krum H, Ronco C. Cardio-renal syndrome: new perspective in diagnostics. Semin Nephrol. 2012; 32:3-17.
  31. Jodele S, Bleesing JJ, Mehta PA, Filipovich AH, Laskin BL, Goebel J, Pinkard SL, Davies SM. Successful early intervention for hyperacute transplant-associated thrombotic microangiopathy following pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Pediatr Transplant. 2012; 16:E39-42.
  32. Kavanaugh GM, Wise-Draper TM, Morreale RJ, Morrison MA, Gole B, Schwemberger S, Tichy ED, Lu L, Babcock GF, Wells JM, Drissi R, Bissler JJ, Stambrook PJ, Andreassen PR, Wiesmuller L, Wells SI. The human DEK oncogene regulates DNA damage response signaling and repair. Nucleic Acids Res. 2011; 39:7465-76.
  33. Krawczeski CD, Goldstein SL, Woo JG, Wang Y, Piyaphanee N, Ma Q, Bennett M, Devarajan P. Temporal relationship and predictive value of urinary acute kidney injury biomarkers after pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2011; 58:2301-9.
  34. Kwiatkowski DM, Goldstein SL, Krawczeski CD. Biomarkers of acute kidney injury in pediatric cardiac patients. Biomark Med. 2012; 6:273-82.
  35. Laskin BL, Goebel J, Davies SM, Jodele S. Small vessels, big trouble in the kidneys and beyond: hematopoietic stem cell transplantation-associated thrombotic microangiopathy. Blood. 2011; 118:1452-62.
  36. Lo MM, Salisbury S, Scherer PE, Furth SL, Warady BA, Mitsnefes MM. Serum adiponectin complexes and cardiovascular risk in children with chronic kidney disease. Pediatr Nephrol. 2011; 26:2009-17.
  37. Malatesta-Muncher R, Mitsnefes MM. Management of blood pressure in children. Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens. 2012; 21:318-22.
  38. Mian AI, Du Y, Garg HK, Caviness AC, Goldstein SL, Bryan NS. Urinary nitrate might be an early biomarker for pediatric acute kidney injury in the emergency department. Pediatr Res. 2011; 70:203-7.
  39. Mitsnefes MM. Cardiovascular disease in children with chronic kidney disease. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2012; 23:578-85.
  40. Moffett BS, Goldstein SL, Adusei M, Kuzin J, Mohan P, Mott AR. Risk factors for postoperative acute kidney injury in pediatric cardiac surgery patients receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2011; 12:555-9.
  41. Molitoris BA, Okusa MD, Palevsky PM, Chawla LS, Kaufman JS, Devarajan P, Toto RM, Hsu CY, Greene TH, Faubel SG, Kellum JA, Wald R, Chertow GM, Levin A, Waikar SS, Murray PT, Parikh CR, Shaw AD, Go AS, Chinchilli VM, Liu KD, Cheung AK, Weisbord SD, Mehta RL, Stokes JB, Thompson AM, Thompson BT, Westenfelder CS, Tumlin JA, Warnock DG, Shah SV, Xie Y, Duggan EG, Kimmel PL, Star RA. Design of clinical trials in AKI: a report from an NIDDK workshop. Trials of patients with sepsis and in selected hospital settings. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2012; 7:856-60.
  42. Muller D, Goldstein SL. Hemodialysis in children with end-stage renal disease. Nat Rev Nephrol. 2011; 7:650-8.
  43. Nehus E, Goebel J, Mitsnefes M, Lorts A, Laskin B. Intensive hemodialysis for cardiomyopathy associated with end-stage renal disease. Pediatr Nephrol. 2011; 26:1909-12.
  44. Nehus EJ, Devarajan P. Acute kidney injury: AKI in kidney transplant recipients--here to stay. Nat Rev Nephrol. 2012; 8:198-9.
  45. Nejat M, Pickering JW, Devarajan P, Bonventre JV, Edelstein CL, Walker RJ, Endre ZH. Some biomarkers of acute kidney injury are increased in pre-renal acute injury. Kidney Int. 2012; 81:1254-62.
  46. Nickolas TL, Schmidt-Ott KM, Canetta P, Forster C, Singer E, Sise M, Elger A, Maarouf O, Sola-Del Valle DA, O'Rourke M, Sherman E, Lee P, Geara A, Imus P, Guddati A, Polland A, Rahman W, Elitok S, Malik N, Giglio J, El-Sayegh S, Devarajan P, Hebbar S, Saggi SJ, Hahn B, Kettritz R, Luft FC, Barasch J. Diagnostic and prognostic stratification in the emergency department using urinary biomarkers of nephron damage: a multicenter prospective cohort study. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012; 59:246-55.
  47. Okusa MD, Molitoris BA, Palevsky PM, Chinchilli VM, Liu KD, Cheung AK, Weisbord SD, Faubel S, Kellum JA, Wald R, Chertow GM, Levin A, Waikar SS, Murray PT, Parikh CR, Shaw AD, Go AS, Chawla LS, Kaufman JS, Devarajan P, Toto RM, Hsu CY, Greene TH, Mehta RL, Stokes JB, Thompson AM, Thompson BT, Westenfelder CS, Tumlin JA, Warnock DG, Shah SV, Xie Y, Duggan EG, Kimmel PL, Star RA. Design of clinical trials in acute kidney injury: a report from an NIDDK workshop--prevention trials. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2012; 7:851-5.
  48. Pai AL, Rausch J, Tackett A, Marsolo K, Drotar D, Goebel J. System for integrated adherence monitoring: real-time non-adherence risk assessment in pediatric kidney transplantation. Pediatr Transplant. 2012; 16:329-34.
  49. Pai AL, Tackett A, Ittenbach RF, Goebel J. Psychosocial Assessment Tool 2.0_General: validity of a psychosocial risk screener in a pediatric kidney transplant sample. Pediatr Transplant. 2012; 16:92-8.
  50. Palevsky PM, Molitoris BA, Okusa MD, Levin A, Waikar SS, Wald R, Chertow GM, Murray PT, Parikh CR, Shaw AD, Go AS, Faubel SG, Kellum JA, Chinchilli VM, Liu KD, Cheung AK, Weisbord SD, Chawla LS, Kaufman JS, Devarajan P, Toto RM, Hsu CY, Greene T, Mehta RL, Stokes JB, Thompson AM, Thompson BT, Westenfelder CS, Tumlin JA, Warnock DG, Shah SV, Xie Y, Duggan EG, Kimmel PL, Star RA. Design of clinical trials in acute kidney injury: report from an NIDDK workshop on trial methodology. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2012; 7:844-50.
  51. Parikh CR, Coca SG, Thiessen-Philbrook H, Shlipak MG, Koyner JL, Wang Z, Edelstein CL, Devarajan P, Patel UD, Zappitelli M, Krawczeski CD, Passik CS, Swaminathan M, Garg AX. Postoperative biomarkers predict acute kidney injury and poor outcomes after adult cardiac surgery. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2011; 22:1748-57.
  52. Parikh CR, Devarajan P, Zappitelli M, Sint K, Thiessen-Philbrook H, Li S, Kim RW, Koyner JL, Coca SG, Edelstein CL, Shlipak MG, Garg AX, Krawczeski CD. Postoperative biomarkers predict acute kidney injury and poor outcomes after pediatric cardiac surgery. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2011; 22:1737-47.
  53. Prowle JR, Calzavacca P, Licari E, Ligabo EV, Echeverri JE, Haase M, Haase-Fielitz A, Bagshaw SM, Devarajan P, Bellomo R. Pilot double-blind, randomized controlled trial of short-term atorvastatin for prevention of acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery. Nephrology (Carlton). 2012; 17:215-24.
  54. Ralib AM, Pickering JW, Shaw GM, Devarajan P, Edelstein CL, Bonventre JV, Endre ZH. Test characteristics of urinary biomarkers depend on quantitation method in acute kidney injury. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2012; 23:322-33.
  55. Romick-Rosendale LE, Brunner HI, Bennett MR, Mina R, Nelson S, Petri M, Kiani A, Devarajan P, Kennedy MA. Identification of urinary metabolites that distinguish membranous lupus nephritis from proliferative lupus nephritis and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Arthritis Res Ther. 2011; 13:R199.
  56. Saldana SN, Hooper DK, Froehlich TE, Campbell KM, Prows CA, Sadhasivam S, Nick TG, Seid M, Vinks AA, Glauser TA. Characteristics of successful recruitment in prospective pediatric pharmacogenetic studies. Clin Ther. 2011; 33:2072-81.
  57. Schroff R, Wuhl E, Mitsnefes M. The Cardiovascular Status of Pediatric Dialysis Patients. Pediatric Dialysis. New York: Springer; 2011:505-530.
  58. Shaw AD, Bagshaw SM, Goldstein SL, Scherer LA, Duan M, Schermer CR, Kellum JA. Major complications, mortality, and resource utilization after open abdominal surgery: 0.9% saline compared to Plasma-Lyte. Ann Surg. 2012; 255:821-9.
  59. Shlipak MG, Coca SG, Wang Z, Devarajan P, Koyner JL, Patel UD, Thiessen-Philbrook H, Garg AX, Parikh CR. Presurgical serum cystatin C and risk of acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery. Am J Kidney Dis. 2011; 58:366-73.
  60. Shroff R, Weaver DJ, Jr., Mitsnefes MM. Cardiovascular complications in children with chronic kidney disease. Nat Rev Nephrol. 2011; 7:642-9.
  61. Silverstein DM, Srivaths PR, Mattison P, Upadhyay K, Midgley L, Moudgil A, Goldstein SL, Feig DI. Serum uric acid is associated with high blood pressure in pediatric hemodialysis patients. Pediatr Nephrol. 2011; 26:1123-8.
  62. Singh S, Kline-Fath B, Bierbrauer K, Racadio JM, Salisbury S, Macaluso M, Jackson EC, Egelhoff JC. Comparison of standard, prone and cine MRI in the evaluation of tethered cord. Pediatr Radiol. 2012; 42:685-91.
  63. Siroky BJ, Bissler JJ. Stressed podocytes fail to fold: a potential new role of ER in FSGS. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2011; 301:F494-5.
  64. Strife CF. Proteinuria. Clinician's Manual of Pediatric Nephrology. Singapore; Hackensack, NJ: World Scientific Publishing Co.; 2011:163-172.
  65. Sundaram N, Bennett M, Wilhelm J, Kim MO, Atweh G, Devarajan P, Malik P. Biomarkers for early detection of sickle nephropathy. Am J Hematol. 2011; 86:559-66.
  66. VanDeVoorde RG. Edema. Schwartz's Clinical Handbook of Pediatrics . Baltimore: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2012:326-334.
  67. VanDeVoorde RG. Urinary Tract Infection . Curbside Consultation in Pediatric Infectious Disease: 49 Clinical Questions . Thorofare, NJ: Slack Inc.; 2012.
  68. VanDeVoorde RG. Nephronophthisis. Clinician's Manual of Pediatric Nephrology. Singapore; Hackensack, NJ: World Scientific Publishing Co; 2011:713-719.
  69. VanDeVoorde RG. Rare Genetic Disorders. Clinician's Manual of Pediatric Nephrology. Singapore; Hackensack, NJ: World Scientific Publishing Co; 2011:720-734.
  70. VanDeVoorde RG, Geary D. Initiation of Maintenance Renal Replacement Therapy in Infants. Pediatric Dialysis. New York: Springer; 2011:101-114.
  71. VanDeVoorde RG, Mitsnefes MM. Hypertension and CKD. Adv Chronic Kidney Dis. 2011; 18:355-61.
  72. Wilson AC, Mitsnefes M. Cardiovascular Disease in Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease. Clinician's Manual of Pediatric Nephrology. Singapore; Hackensack, NJ: World Scientific Publishing Co.; 2011:649-658.
  73. Wilson AC, Schneider MF, Cox C, Greenbaum LA, Saland J, White CT, Furth S, Warady BA, Mitsnefes MM. Prevalence and correlates of multiple cardiovascular risk factors in children with chronic kidney disease. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2011; 6:2759-65.
  74. Zappitelli M, Goldstein SL. Hemodialysis and Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy. Pediatric Nephrology: A Handbook for Training Health Care Providers. Singapore; Hackensack, NJ: World Scientific Publishing Co; 2011:521-550.
  75. Zappitelli M, Krawczeski CD, Devarajan P, Wang Z, Sint K, Thiessen-Philbrook H, Li S, Bennett MR, Ma Q, Shlipak MG, Garg AX, Parikh CR. Early postoperative serum cystatin C predicts severe acute kidney injury following pediatric cardiac surgery. Kidney Int. 2011; 80:655-62.

Faculty, Staff, and Trainees

Faculty Members

Prasad Devarajan, MD, Professor
Leadership Louise M. Williams Endowed Chair; Director, Division of Nephrology & Hypertension; Director, Clinical Nephrology Laboratory; CEO, Dialysis Unit
Research Interests Pathogenesis, biomarkers, and novel therapies of acute kidney injury; Pathogenesis and biomarkers of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis; Pathogenesis and biomarkers of lupus nephritis
Michael Bennett, PhD, Assistant Professor
Leadership Director, Biomarker Laboratory
Research Interests Biomarker discovery in acute and chronic kidney disease; focal segmental glomerulosclerosis
John J. Bissler, MD, Professor
Leadership Director, Nephrology Fellowship Training Program; Associate Program Director for Research and Academic Careers; Clark D. West Chair of Nephrology
Research Interests Polycystic kidney disease, renal tumors, tuberous sclerosis complex, Renal Cell Biology
Bradley P. Dixon, MD, Assistant Professor
Leadership Assistant Director, Nephrology Fellowship Training Program
Research Interests DNA damage and repair, cell biology of the augmented bladder, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura
Jens Goebel, MD, Associate Professor
Leadership Medical Director of Transplantation; Clinical Director, Nephrology
Research Interests Advancing basic and translational investigations into immunological aspects especially relevant to the field of transplantation
Stuart Goldstein, MD, Professor
Leadership Director, Center for Acute Care Nephrology; Medical Director, Pheresis Service
Research Interests Acute Kidney Injury, End Stage Renal Disease, Multi-Organ Dysfunction Syndrome, Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy, Cardio-Renal Syndrome, Nephrotoxic medication injury
Elizabeth Jackson, MD, Associate Professor
Leadership Director, Healthy Bladder Clinic
Research Interests Nocturnal enuresis, kidney stones, lower urinary tract dysfunction
Paul McEnery, MD, Professor Emeritus
Research Interests Glomerulonephritis; vitamin D resistant rickets; End Stage Renal Disease
Mark Mitsnefes, MD, Professor
Leadership Program Director, Clinical Translational Research Center
Research Interests Cardiovascular abnormalities and risk factors for increased cardiac morbidity and mortality in children with CKD; evaluation of LVH; cIMT; hypertension
C. Frederic Strife, MD, Professor Emeritus
Research Interests Clinical aspects of glomerulonephritis and dialysis
Rene Vandevoorde, MD, Assistant Professor
Leadership Medical Director, Dialysis Unit
Research Interests Chronic Kidney Disease; Dialysis including Infant Dialysis; Epidemiology of Renal Diseases; Medical Education
David Hooper, MD, Assistant Professor
Research Interests Reliable and innovative chronic disease management, cardiovascular outcomes following kidney transplantation

Trainees

  • Edward Nehus, MD, PL-3
  • Rossana Malatesta-Muncher, MD, PL-3
  • Ahmad Kaddourah, MD, PL-2
  • Donna Claes, MD, PL-2
  • Nianzhou Xiao, MD, PL-1
  • Matthew O'Rourke, MD, PL-1

Division Collaboration

Heart Institute » Catherine Krawczeski
Co-investigator on studies entitled "Novel biomarkers in cardiac surgery to detect acute kidney injury" and "Ancillary Studies in the natural history of acute kidney injury" (Prasad Devarajan)
Rheumatology » Hermine Brunner
Co-investigator on studies entitled "Forecasters of progression of chronic kidney disease" and "Advanced Proteomics for the early prediction of lupus nephritis" (Prasad Devarajan)
Rheumatology » Hermine Brunner
Co-PI on study entitled "Biomarkers to distinguish classes of lupus nephritis" and Research Associate on "Advanced Proteomics for the early prediction of lupus nephritis" (Prasad Devarajan)
Developmental Biology » Steven Potter
Co-investigator on studies entitled "Glomerulosclerosis in human FSGS and mouse models" (Prasad Devarajan)
Hematology/Oncology » Sonata Jodele
Co-Investigator on study entitled "A Prospective Analysis of Clinical and Biochemical Markers for Pediatric Stem Cell Transplant-Associated Thrombotic Microangiopathy" (Prasad Devarajan)
Critical Care Medicine » Derek Wheeler
Use of Novel Urine and Blood Biomarkers to Optimize Fluid Dosing in Critically Ill Children with Acute Kidney Injury (Prasad Devarajan)
James M Anderson Ctr for Health Systems Excellence » Peter A. Margolis
Reliable Individualized Monitoring Improves Cholesterol Control in Kidney Transplant Recipients (David K. Hooper, Jens Goebel)
James M Anderson Ctr for Health Systems Excellence » Adam C. Carle
Quality of CVD Care in Adolescents (David K. Hooper, Mark Mitsnefes)
Clinical Pharmacology » Tsuyoshi Fukuda, Alexander Vinks, and Rhonda Gardiner
Risk of Tacrolimus Toxicity in CYP3A5 Non-Expressors Treated with Intravenous Nicardipine After Kidney Transplantation (David K. Hooper, Jens Goebel)
James M Anderson Ctr for Health Systems Excellence » Ashwini Roy-Chaudhury
Risk of Tacrolimus Toxicity in CYP3A5 Non-Expressors Treated with Intravenous Nicardipine After Kidney Transplantation (David K. Hooper, Jens Goebel)
James M Anderson Ctr for Health Systems Excellence; Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology; Preventive Cardiology » Peter A. Margolis, Ahna Pai, and Elaine M. Urbina
A Reliable Blood Pressure Management System (David K. Hooper, Mark Mitsnefes, Jens Goebel)
Urology » William DeFoor, Pramod Reddy, and Paul Noh
Collect NGAL on hydronephrosis before and after repair (Prasad Devarajan)

Grants, Contracts, and Industry Agreements

Division Grants

Grant and Contract AwardsAnnual Direct

Devarajan, P

Research Training in Pediatric Nephrology
T32 DK 00769507/01/07-06/30/12$126,844

Dixon, B

DNA Damage and Response in the Bladder Microenvironment.
K08 DK 08173707/01/11-04/30/15$140,200

Mitsnefes, M

Cardiovascular Disease in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease
K24 DK 09007007/01/11-06/30/16$158,114
Cincinnati Center for Clinical/Translational Sciences & Training
UL1 RR 02631404/03/09-03/31/14$1,463,314

Siroky, B

Environmental Carcinogenesis and Mutagenesis
TSA 05-1112/15/11-12/14/13$60,000
Current Year Direct$1,948,472
Industry Contracts

Bissler, J

$215,069
$34,157

Goebel, J

$3,080
$22,784

Goldstein, S

$30,800
$19,250

VandeVoorde, R

$16,824
$14,091
Current Year Direct Receipts$356,055
Service Collaborations

Goldstein, S

$4,800
$6,975
Current Year Direct$11,775
Total$2,316,302