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    Antibody for Prevention of Central Line Infection & Biofilm Growth
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    Technology Overview

    Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida spp. are the most common causes of central line infection, and Dr. Hostetter has identified heparin binding motifs in surface-associated proteins in these organisms that mediate biofilm formation. Using C. albicans as the prototype organism, she has shown that heparin that is present as an anticoagulant in central lines binds to the microbial surface proteins, and mutation of residues in a single heparin binding motif within these proteins prevents biofilm formation. A polyclonal IgG recognizing the motif stops biofilm formation in a rat model, while control IgG has no effect. These results show the efficacy of peptides or monoclonal antibodies in preventing biofilm formation and central line associated bloodstream infections.

    Applications

    • Treatment and prevention of infections arising on the surface of central lines or other implanted devices. Typical patient populations/clinical treatment regimens that fall under the primary application include, for example:
      • Premature newborns – 2-6 months
      • Cancer patients - 12–24 months
      • Outpatient antibiotic therapy - 1–6 months
      • Renal hemodialysis - 36–60 months (until dialysis is replaced with transplant-average wait time on transplant list is 3-5 years)
    • The antibody could potentially be effective in other instances wherein a foreign body is introduced into a patient, provided the foreign body displays the appropriate surface protein that carries the target heparin-binding motif. Examples include:
      • Heart valve replacements: It is not atypical to develop infection after a heart valve replacement procedure. Replacement tissue is often taken from a bovine tissue source, and does display the proteoglycan capable of binding both the antibody and the organisms that cause infection.
        • In addition, heparin is often used to prevent Deep Vein Thrombosis in cardiac procedures, which also “attracts” the organisms that typically cause the infection mediated via the heparin binding motif. The accepted clinical protocol may actually exacerbate the infection risk, and the antibody could potentially mitigate infection risk for this population/procedure.
      • Prosthetic orthopedic procedures: It is not atypical for patients to develop infections on the surface of implanted orthopedic prosthetics (knee replacements, hip replacements, and similar). Like cardiac procedures, heparin sulfate is often used to prevent Deep Vein Thrombosis, which similarly “attracts” the organisms that typically cause the infection mediated via the heparin binding motif. Again, the accepted clinical protocol may actually exacerbate the infection risk, and the antibody could potentially mitigate infection risk for this population/procedure.

    Advantages

    • Easily administered to patients
    • Reduces morbidity and mortality associated with central line infections
    • Reduces costs to the healthcare system

    Market Overview

    For an in-depth market overview, please click here.

    • Central Line Infections are estimated to cost the US healthcare system between $7.5 and $11 billion annually.
    • More than 40 million central catheter days occur annually in the US alone.

    Patent Information

    Pending PCT Application
    PCT/US13/31499
    Priority Date: 04/20/2012
    Will File Worldwide Coverage

    Lead Investigator
    Margaret Hostetter, MD
    Albert B. Sabin Professor
    Director, Division of Infectious Diseases

    Publication


  • For more information, please contact Chris Stahl, Business Development Manager at christopher.stahl@cchmc.org or 513-803-5151.

 
  • Antibody for prevention of central line infection and biofilm growth

    Click image for caption.

    Antibody for Prevention of Central Line Infection & Biofilm Growth

    Antibody for prevention of central line infection and biofilm growth

    Top panels (A) show a heparinized jugular venous catheter removed from a Sprague Dawley rat 24 hours after injection of C. albicans incubated with pre-immune lgG.

    Bottom panels (B) show a heparinized jugular venous catheter removed from a Sprague Dawley rat 24 hours after injection of C. albicans incubated with post-immune, affinity purified lgG recognizing heparin binding motif #1.