Rothenberg Lab

  • Meet the Rothenberg Lab

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    + Marc Rothenberg, MD, PhD

    rothenberg-marc-Rothenberg lab_cc_100xMarc Rothenberg, MD, PhD
    Director of the Division of Allergy and Immunology

    Rothenberg is a tenured professor of pediatrics at Cincinnati Children’s and the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He graduated summa cum laude with highest honors in chemistry and biochemistry from Brandeis University. At Harvard Medical School in the combined MD / PhD program, his PhD under the mentorship of Dr. Frank Austen included seminal studies on eosinophil hematopoiesis. He developed the first culture system for human eosinophils. 

    After a two-year residency in pediatrics at Children’s Hospital Boston, Rothenberg did a combined fellowship in allergy / immunology and hematology there.  During this fellowship, Rothenberg did postdoctorate training in the genetics laboratory of Dr. Philip Leder at Harvard Medical School, where he cloned the eotaxin chemokine. After being faculty of Harvard Medical School for one year, he came to the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children's, where he has helped build a top program in pediatric research, and his division is a leader in pediatric allergy and immunology. He manages a research program focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms of allergic disorders. In addition, he sees patients suffering from allergic and immunological diseases from around the world as part of the Cincinnati Center for Eosinophilic Disorders, which he directs.

    Rothenberg’s awards include the Pharmacia Allergy Research Foundation Award for the best young investigator in the allergy field; the Young Investigator Award and the Scholar in Allergy Award from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology; the Ohio Governor’s Recognition Award; the 2007 E. Mead Johnson Award from the Society of Pediatric Research; and an NIH MERIT Award in 2010 from the NIAID. He is an elected member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation, Association of American Physicians, Society for Pediatric Research, and a diplomate of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 

    Among his extensive publications of over 260 articles on molecular mechanisms of allergic responses,  Rothenberg edited a book titled, “Chemokines in Allergic Disease.” He has served on various review panels for journals and grant agencies including the National Institutes of Health, where he served on the Advisory Council of the NIAID, Burroughs Trust, and the Medical Research Council of the UK. His research has been supported by numerous sources including the National Institutes of Health, the US Department of Defense, Human Frontier Science Program Organization, the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, the Dana Foundation and the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network.
    marc.rothenberg@cchmc.org


  • Postdoctoral Fellows / Research Associates

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    + Carine Bouffi, PhD

    Photo of Carine Bouffi, PhD.Carine Bouffi, PhD
    Postdoctoral Fellow

    Bouffi recently joined the Rothenberg lab, and we are excited that she is here. In France, she did her PhD work on mesenchymal stem cells and their ability to reduce inflammation in arthritis. She also loves to cook and plays basketball.
    carine.bouffi@inserm.fr

    + Julie Caldwell, PhD

    Photo of Julie Caldwell, PhD.Julie Caldwell, PhD
    Research Associate

    Caldwell completed her BS at Xavier University and PhD in the lab of Yolanda Sanchez at the University of Cincinnati. Caldwell is researching the molecular mechanisms of eosinophilic esophagitis. She is identifying noninvasive biomarkers for the disease and analyzing steroid-induced signaling. She and her husband like to play softball and watch sports.
    julie.caldwell1@cchmc.org

    + Benjamin Davis, MD

    Photo of Benjamin Davis, MD.Benjamin Davis, MD
    Allergy Fellow

    Davis came to the Rothenberg Lab from an internal medicine residency at the University of Cincinnati. His research centers on gastrointestinal mucosal inflammation with a current project focused on deciphering the contribution of actin polymerization to eosinophilic esophagitis. He has received grants and awards from the Medical Scientist Training Program, University of Iowa, Clinical Scientist Training Program and University of Cincinnati and received the ACAAI Fellow Grant in 2010 and AAAAI Fellow Grant in 2012. Originally from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, he loves to play soccer, golf and snowboard. His favorite quote is by Albert Einstein: "The most beautiful experience we can have is the mysterious-the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science." 
    benjamin.davis@cchmc.org

    + EunJin Lim, PhD

    Photo of EunJin Lim, PhD.EunJin Lim, PhD
    Research Associate

    Lim comes from the University of Kentucky. Her research focuses on the role of CBP in eosinophilic esophagitis. Originally from South Korea, she likes cooking. Her favorite quote is, “The only stupid question is the one not asked.”
    eun-jin.lim@cchmc.org

    + Leah Nesbitt Kottyan, PhD

    Photo of Leah Nesbitt Kottyan, PhD.Leah Nesbitt Kottyan, PhD
    Research Associate

    Nesbitt Kottyan recently defended her PhD from the lab of Nives Zimmermann in the Division of Allergy and Immunology at Cincinnati Children's.  She is continuing with her work by helping to unravel the genetic profile of patients with eosinophilic disorders.  She is in both the Divisions of Rheumatology and Allergy and Immunology. When she is not at work, she likes to run and spend time with her husband and two children.
    leah.kottyan@cchmc.org

    + Mark Rochman, PhD

    Photo of Mark Rochman, PhD.Mark Rochman, PhD
    Research Associate

    Rochman came to the Rothenberg Lab from the National Institutes of Health. He has been awarded several grants and awards, including the Fellows Award for Research Excellence (FARE) in 2010. His research interests center on chromatin (structure, function, dynamics in cytokine signaling), epigenetics and transcriptional regulation and the role of non-histone chromatin architectural proteins in gene expression. He enjoys biking and speaks three languages at home with his wife and three children.
    mark.rochman@cchmc.org

    + Joseph Sherrill, PhD

    Photo of Joseph Sherrill, PhD.Joseph Sherrill, PhD
    Research Instructor

    Sherrill earned his PhD from the University of Cincinnati and his BS from Ohio University. His research is focused on identifying genetic variations within individuals with eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) through genome-wide association studies and SNP genotyping. The role of these candidate gene variants in EE progression and severity will be validated using in vitro biochemical analyses and in vivo models.
    joseph.sherrill@cchmc.org

    + Ting Wen, PhD

    Photo of Ting Wen, PhD.Ting Wen, PhD
    Postdoctoral Fellow

    Wen is a postdoctoral fellow from Rutgers University / UMDNJ. While at Rutgers, he studied genetics of the opioid receptor and how chemokines and cytokines influence arthritis and other TH1 / TH2 reactions. He hopes to continue his opioid receptor studies by looking at these receptors in the regulation of eosinophils and other gastrointestinal disorders. His favorite quote is, "Chance favors the prepared mind." − Louis Pasteur
    tackycardia@yahoo.com


  • Predoctoral Students

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    + Rahul D'Mello

    Photo of Rahul D'Mello.Rahul D'Mello
    MD/PhD Student

    Rahul has his Bachelor's in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering from the Johns Hopkins University.  He is studying several genes of interest with differentially upregulated transcripts in Eosinophilic Esophagitis in order to elucidate the role these genes play in the pathogenesis of the disease.
    Rahul.D'Mello@cchmc.org


  • Research Assistants

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    + John Besse

    Photo of John Besse.John Besse
    Research Assistant III

    John received his bachelor's degree in biomedical engineering from the University of Cincinnati in 2008. He joined the lab recently after working in the tissue engineering department at Shriners Hospitals for Children - Cincinnati. His responsibilities include developing and maintaining primary cell cultures and taking care of transgenic mouse colonies. He enjoys ultimate frisbee, documentaries, and exploring the local music scene.
    john.besse@cchmc.org

    + Kiran KC

    Photo of Kiran KC.Kiran KC
    Research Assistant III

    Kiran KC is from the University of Texas at Arlington(UTA), where he received a Double Major Bachelor's degree in Microbiology and Biology-Genomics.  At Cincinnati Children's Hospital, Kiran works a project to investigate the role of cell junction proteins, Desmoglein 1 and Claudin 10 in the eosinophilic esophagitis epithelial phenotype.
    kiran.kc@cchmc.org

    + Melissa Mingler, MS, MBA

    Photo of Melissa Mingler, MS, MBA.Melissa Mingler, MS, MBA
    Laboratory Manager, Senior Research Assistant

    Mingler was born and raised in Cincinnati. She received her BS in biochemistry and microbiology from Ohio University as well as her MS in biochemistry and molecular biology from Michigan State University. She coordinates and assists in various aspects of the Rothenberg lab including placing / tracking orders, genotyping, running experiments and taking care of the mouse colony. She enjoys running, soccer and camping.
    mellissa.mingler@cchmc.org

    + Emily Stucke

    Photo of Emily Stucke.Emily Stucke
    Research Assistant IV

    Stucke received her BA in microbiology with a minor in molecular biology from Miami University in Oxford, OH. She is responsible for processing DNA samples for the Cincinnati Center for Eosinophilic Disorders (CCED) database, as well as taking care of the transgenic mouse colonies. She enjoys chocolate and soccer. She plans to go to graduate or medical school.
    emily.stucke@cchmc.org


  • Clinical Research Faculty / Support Staff

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    + J. Pablo Abonia, MD

    Photo of J. Pablo Abonia, MD.J. Pablo Abonia, MD
    Associate Professor

    Abonia provides the bulk of the clinical allergy care for patients with eosinophilic disorders. His research focuses on mining the databanks (patient characteristics, tissue samples, RNA, DNA) to elucidate the mechanisms, diagnosis and treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis. He is interested in the role of mast cells in eosinophilic esophagitis. He received his BS, MS and MD degrees from the State University of New York at Buffalo.
    pablo.abonia@cchmc.org

    + Clinical Research Coordinators

    Learn more about the clinical research coordinators of the Cincinnati Center for Eosinophilic Disorders.