Developmental Biology

  • Research Faculty

  • Show All

    Division Head

    DefaultUserSmall

    Raphael Kopan, PhD Director, Division of Developmental Biology

    and his lab have the long-term goal of organogenesis in vitro. They focus their efforts on Notch signaling as their lead into mechanistic understanding of tissue diversity using genetic engineering, embryology and single cell profiling. They interrogate the mouse embryo to address critical questions regarding the circuit logic of Notch signaling in mammalian organogenesis and its integration in larger signaling context.

    Visit the Kopan Lab.

    513-636-1299

    Raphael Kopan, PhD

    Director, Division of Developmental Biology

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-1299

    Show All

    Specialties

    Research

    Notch signaling; kidney organogenesis; skin organogenesis; TSLP signaling in cancer

    Biography

    Raphael Kopan, PhD, who is a professor of developmental biology at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, has carried out seminal work in the field of Notch biology. This work has, and continues to have, an enormous impact on our understanding of normal tissue development and renewal, Alzheimer's disease and cancer-related research. In deciphering the mode of Notch activation and demonstrating the use of inhibitors to modulate Notch activity, Dr. Kopan's work laid the groundwork for the therapeutic use of γ-secretase inhibitors in the treatment of cancers, currently in clinical trials. His current interests in organogenesis are focused on two modular organs - skin and kidney - in which his group is trying to understand how interplay among the same seven pathways results in activation of distant programs. Dr. Kopan's work has resulted in 120 scientific articles as of 2013. He is the co-inventor of one patent, and he has served on scientific advisory boards as well as being a consultant to the pharmaceutical industry.

    Education and Training

    BS, MsC: Department of Zoology, Tel-Aviv University, Israel.

    PhD: Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

    Post-doctoral training: The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Faculty

    A photo of Bruce Aronow.

    Bruce J. Aronow, PhD Co-director, Computational Medicine Center

    focuses his research on unraveling the role and mechanism by which the functional capabilities of the human genome shape human health and the body’s ability to adapt to stressful challenges. With the co-leadership of Anil Jegga, DVM, his lab is using a variety of available data on structural and functional genomics and biological systems to form models of how biological systems assemble, adapt and become impaired in disease.
    Visit the Aronow/Jegga Lab.

    513-636-0263
    bruce.aronow@cchmc.org

    Bruce J. Aronow, PhD

    Co-director, Computational Medicine Center

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-0263

    Fax: 513-636-2056

    Email: bruce.aronow@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Biography

    Dr. Aronow's research is devoted to unraveling both the role and mechanism by which the functional capabilities of the human genome shape human health and our ability to adapt to stressful challenges. His lab is using a variety of available structural and functional genomic and biological systems descriptive data to form models of how biological systems assemble, adapt and become impaired in disease. The lab's overall hypothesis is that by interconnecting as much experimental and observational information as possible, we can gain new insights into the mechanisms by which different biological systems can achieve health or healthy adaptation, or undergo disease processes. More specific, with the co-leadership of Anil Jegga, DVM, the lab is identifying genetic features that control gene expression including cis-elements, trans factors and microRNAs, which normally work together in extended cell, tissue, organ and systems networks to enable development and homeostasis. Alterations of these features can alter phenotypes and increase or decrease disease. Some of the lab's work includes the identification of conserved, diverged and evolved cis-element clusters that are acted on by transcription and chromatin proteins. The lab has developed a Web-based tool called GenomeTraFaC that at present allows discovery of shared cis-elements in conserved non-coding sequences of mice and humans.

    Education and Training

    BS: Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 1976.

    PhD: Biochemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 1986.

    Research Fellowship: Division of Basic Science Research, Cincinnati Children's Research Foundation, Cincinnati, OH, 1986-1989.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    CTSA - Enabling Tehnologies: Center for Translational & Molecular Disease. National Institutes of Health. Apr 2009 - Mar 2014.
    A photo of Samantha Brugmann.

    Samantha A. Brugmann, PhD

    is a developmental biologist who aims to understand craniofacial development and elucidate the molecular basis for diseases that affect the craniofacial complex. Furthermore, Dr. Brugmann attempts to understand the forces that help pattern the face during normal and abnormal development she utilizes various model systems with unique facial morphologies.

    Visit the Brugmann Lab.

    513-636-7678
    samantha.brugmann@cchmc.org

    Samantha A. Brugmann, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Surgery

    Phone: 513-636-7678

    Email: samantha.brugmann@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Craniofacial development

    Visit the Brugmann Lab.

    Biography

    Samantha A. Brugmann, PhD, is an assistant professor of pediatrics in the Divisions of Plastic Surgery and Developmental Biology. She received her BS in cell and molecular biology in 1998 from Tulane University in New Orleans, LA. She then moved to Washington, DC to study cranial sensory placode development in Xenopus laevis at George Washington University. After receiving her PhD in genetics from George Washington University in 2004, she moved to Stanford, CA to do her postdoctoral research in craniofacial development at Stanford University. While at Stanford she received a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards for Individual Postdoctoral Fellows (F32) in 2006, a Pediatric Research Fund-Child Health Research Program Grant in 2009 and a NIH Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00) in 2010. She joined Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in January 2011 to study craniofacial development and disease.

    Education and Training

    BS: Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, 1998.

    PhD: George Washington University, Washington DC, 2004.

    Fellowship: Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 2004-2010.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Kenneth Campbell.

    Kenneth J. Campbell, PhD

    studies the molecular genetic control of mouse forebrain development with a particular focus on the generation of neuronal diversity in the ventral telencephalon.

    513-636-0246
    kenneth.campbell@cchmc.org

    Kenneth J. Campbell, PhD

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-0246

    Fax: 513-636-4317

    Email: kenneth.campbell@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Molecular genetic control of mammalian forebrain development

    Education and Training

    MS: University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, 1990.

    PhD: University of Lund, Lund, Sweden, 1994.

    Postdoctoral Fellow: Skirball Institute, NYU Med Center, 1995-97.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Sang-Wook Cha.

    Sang-Wook Cha, PhD

    investigates how Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) signaling between lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) and endoderm regulates apicobasal polarity (ABP) of intestinal epithelium and controls radial-intercalation and gut elongation. Dr. Cha uses both amphibian and mouse/human organoids as the model systems.

    513-803-3014
    sang-wook.cha@cchmc.org

    Sang-Wook Cha, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-3014

    Email: sang-wook.cha@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Molecular basis of fetal intestine development; Wnt signaling; stem cells

    Education and Training

    PhD: College of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, South Korea, 2005.

    Senior Researcher: Brain Korea21 project, 2005-2007.

    Research Fellow/Associate: Cincinnati Children’s Research Foundation, Cincinnati, OH, 2007-2012.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications.
    No photo available

    Vaughn G. Cleghon, PhD

    is interested in understanding the role of protein kinases in development and disease. His lab uses molecular biology, tissue culture, Drosophila genetics and bioinformatics to better understand fundamental mechanisms involved in the regulation of protein kinase activity. 
    Visit the Cleghon Lab.

    513-803-0470
    vaughn.cleghon@cchmc.org

    Vaughn G. Cleghon, PhD

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-0470

    Fax: 513-636-4317

    Email: vaughn.cleghon@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Protein kinases in development and human disease

    Visit the Cleghon Lab.

    Education and Training

    PhD: Waksman Institute of Microbiology, Rutgers, Piscataway, NJ, 1991.

    Postdoctoral Fellow: Dr. Deborah Morrison ABL-Basic Research Program, National Cancer Institute, Frederick Cancer Research Center, Frederick, MD.

    Group Leader: Beatson Institute for Cancer Research, Beatson Laboratories, UK.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Tiffany Cook.

    Tiffany Cook, PhD

    studies cell type specification using the Drosophila eye as a model. The lab is focuses on gene regulation, and uses a combination of developmental genetics and biochemistry to understand the role of various transcription factors during photoreceptor and lens development.
    Visit the Cook Lab.

    513-636-6991
    tiffany.cook@cchmc.org

    Tiffany Cook, PhD

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-6991

    Fax: 513-803-0740

    Email: tiffany.cook@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Understanding the molecular basis of eye development; differentiation of color photoreceptor subtypes in the Drosophila retina; cell-specific regulation of opsin gene expression; mechanisms of cell-specific transcriptional activation and repression

    Differentiation of color photoreceptor subtypes in the Drosophila retina; cell-specific regulation of opsin gene expression; mechanisms of cell-specific transcriptional activation and repression

    Visit the Cook Lab.

    Education and Training

    BA: Biology, Summa Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa, 1987-1991. 

    PhD: Biomedical Sciences/Molecular Biology, 1991-1997. 

    Postdoctoral fellowships: Gastroenterology, 1997-1999; Molecular Genetics, 1999-2004.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Steven Crone.

    Steven A. Crone, PhD

    focuses his research around understanding how neurons form functioning motor circuits during development and how the function (or dysfunction) of motor circuits impacts neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy.
    Visit the Crone Lab.

    513-803-9275
    steven.crone@cchmc.org

    Steven A. Crone, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-9275

    Email: steven.crone@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Developmental biology; neurodegenerative disease; neural control of behavior; locomotion; respiration; motor circuits; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; spinal muscular atrophy (SMA)

    Visit the Crone Lab.

    Biography

    Steven Crone, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery. He received his BS with honors from The Pennsylvania State University in 1995. He received his PhD from the University of California, San Diego while performing his thesis research at The Salk Institute for Biological Studies.

    His thesis research demonstrated that the ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase is essential for maintenance of the enteric nervous system and prevention of dilated cardiomyopathy. His research has important implications for the treatment of Hirschsprung’s disease, heart disease and ErbB2/Her2 dependent breast cancer.

    Dr. Crone performed his postdoctoral work at the University of Chicago where he used transgenic mouse models to label, ablate or alter gene expression in specific interneurons to establish that V2a neurons coordinate limb movement during locomotion and promote a normal breathing rhythm.

    He joined Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in September of 2012 where his laboratory will investigate how motor circuits are altered by injury or disease.

    Education and Training

    BS: The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 1995.

    PhD: University of California, San Diego and The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, San Diego, CA, 2003.

    Postdoctoral: University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 2012.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Andrew Dauber.

    Andrew Dauber, MD, MMSc Program Director and Director of Translational Research, Cincinnati Center for Growth Disorders

    investigates the genetic etiology of growth disorders and other pediatric endocrine conditions. His research employs the latest in genomic technologies to discover novel genetic causes of growth disorders in patients with previously undiagnosed conditions. Further laboratory investigations are then performed to understand the underlying perturbations to growth biology.

    513-803-7027
    andrew.dauber@cchmc.org

    Andrew Dauber, MD, MMSc

    Program Director and Director of Translational Research, Cincinnati Center for Growth Disorders

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-7027

    Email: andrew.dauber@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Clinical

    Pediatric endocrinology; growth disorders; precocious puberty

    Research

    Growth disorders; precocious puberty

    Education and Training

    MD: Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 2000.

    MS: Clinical Investigation, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 2008.

    Residency: Pediatrics, Boston Combined Residency Program in Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital and Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA.

    Chief Resident: Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, 2004-2005.

    Fellowship: Pediatric Endocrinology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA.

    Certification: Pediatrics, Pediatric Endocrinology

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Tony De Falco.

    Tony J. De Falco, PhD

    has basic research programs in gonad differentiation and homeostasis. His lab investigates how the initially undifferentiated gonad primordium transforms into a testis or ovary, as well as how the adult testis maintains sperm production over a long reproductive lifespan. His specific interests are in the novel and diverse roles of myeloid immune cells in reproductive biology.

    Visit the De Falco Lab.

    513-803-3988
    tony.defalco@cchmc.org

    Tony J. De Falco, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-3988

    Email: tony.defalco@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Differentiation of the fetal gonad into a sexually dimorphic and structurally specialized organ; spermatogonial differentiation; roles of myeloid cells in tissue remodeling, organ vascularization and spermatogonial development.

    Visit the De Falco Lab.

    Education and Training

    BA: University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA.

    PhD: Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.

    Postdoc: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC.

    Postdoc: National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, Japan.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications.
    A photo of Sandra Degen, PhD.

    Sandra J. F. Degen, PhD Associate Chair for Academic Affairs

    studies the regulation of expression of proteins in blood coagulation and growth control: prothrombin and hepatocyte growth factor-like protein, and its membrane tyrosine kinase receptor (Ron).

    513-636-4816
    sandra.degen@cchmc.org

    Sandra J. F. Degen, PhD

    Associate Chair for Academic Affairs

    Vice President for Research, University of Cincinnati

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4816

    Fax: 513-636-4317

    Email: sandra.degen@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Regulation of expression of proteins in blood coagulation and growth control: prothrombin; hepatocyte growth factor-like protein (HGFL) and its membrane tyrosine kinase receptor (Ron)

    Biography

    Sandra J. F. Degen, PhD, received her BA degree in chemistry from the University of California, San Diego in 1976 and her PhD degree in biochemistry from the University of Washington in 1982.

    Following a two year post-doctoral fellowship at the Friedrich Miescher Institute in Basel, Switzerland, she was appointed as an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Cincinnati in 1985. She is presently a tenured professor of pediatrics.

    The research in Dr. Degen's laboratory focused on two areas of interest that includes blood coagulation and cancer research. Dr. Degen has three patents in this area. Dr. Degen has had continuous grant support since she received her first academic position, and until 2006 was principal investigator on two National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants.

    Dr. Degen's honors and awards include being selected as a pew scholar in the biomedical sciences supported by the Pew Memorial Trust, being awarded an Established Investigatorship from the American Heart Association, serving as a regular member of the Hematology II study section at the NIH and being selected to attend the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine Program for Women in 1997. Most recently she was selected to participate in the Science and Society Institute sponsored by the Pew Scholars Program.

    For the University of Cincinnati, she is responsible for all research compliance activities, the animal research program, sponsored research services, sponsored program accounting, entrepreneurial affairs, the intellectual property office, research educational programs and regional, state and federal advocacy with regard to research. More information can be found at the web site for the Office of Research.

    Dr. Degen serves on the board of directors of Bio/Start, the Ohio Aerospace Institute, TechSolve and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities.

    Education and Training

    BA: University of California, San Diego, 1976.

    PhD: University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 1982.

    Fellowship: Post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Washington in Seattle, WA, 1982-83; post-doctoral Fellowship at the Friedrich Meischer Institute in Basel, Switzerland, 1983-1985.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Prasad Devarajan.

    Prasad Devarajan, MD Director, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension

    researches acute kidney injury mechanisms, biomarkers and novel therapies. He also studies focal segmental glomerulosclerosis pathogenesis and biomarkers; and lupus nephritis molecular pathways and biomarkers. For each condition, his team employs an integrated approach of genomic and proteomic discovery in animal and human models, followed by translation, and validation in the human disease states.
    Visit the Devarajan Lab.

    513-636-4531
    prasad.devarajan@cchmc.org

    Prasad Devarajan, MD

    Director, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension

    Medical Director, Stone Center

    Director, Nephrology and Hypertension Clinical Laboratory

    Louise M. Williams Endowed Chair

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4531

    Fax: 513-636-7407

    Email: prasad.devarajan@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Clinical specialties: Acute kidney injury, nephrotic syndrome, kidney stones

    Visit the Devarajan Lab.

    Education and Training

    Premedical Studies: Bombay University, India, 1979. 

    MD: Bombay University, India, 1985.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of SK Dey.

    SK Dey, PhD Lova Riekert Chair and Professor of Pediatrics, Cancer and Cell Biology

    investigates the paracrine, autocrine and juxtacrine signaling networks that influence uterine biology in the context of embryo-uterine interactions during pregnancy. He also works on the effects of endocannabinoids on periimplantation events. Studies involving the molecular and genetic regulation of epithelial ovarian cancer and uterine carcinoma are also of interest.
    Visit the Dey Lab.

    513-803-1158
    sk.dey@cchmc.org

    SK Dey, PhD

    Lova Riekert Chair and Professor of Pediatrics, Cancer and Cell Biology

    Director, Division of Reproductive Sciences

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-1158

    Fax: 513-803-1160

    Email: sk.dey@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Prostaglandin-nuclear receptor-angiogenic signaling axis during embryo implantation with special emphasis to cPLA2α-Cox2-PPARδ-Vegf network in the uterus; cytokine-growth factor-homeobox-morphogen signaling axis in implantation involving Lif-Hb-Egf-Hoxa10/Msx1-Ihh/Bmp/Wnt network in the uterus; immunophilin/cochaperone-nuclear signaling in the mouse uterus during implantation involving Fkbp52-PR; ligand-receptor signaling with endocannabinoids during the periimplantation events in mice in the context of anandamide interacting with G-protein coupled receptors, CB1 and CB2; molecular and genetic basis of epithelial ovarian cancer with special reference to prostaglandin-PPAR signaling; miRNA and Cox-2 regulation in uterine biology and cancer; Pten and uterine carcinoma: conditionally gene deleted mouse models

    Visit the Dey Lab.

    Biography

    Dr. Dey received his PhD from The University of Calcutta College of Sciences in 1972, after which he received postdoctoral training at the University of Kansas Medical Center from 1973-1977, followed by his faculty appointment in 1977 where he rose to the rank of University Distinguished Professor. He moved to Vanderbilt University as Dorothy Overall Wells professor of pediatrics, cell and developmental biology and pharmacology in 2002. In both places he directed NIH-funded reproductive biology training grants. In 2008, Dr. Dey moved to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center as Lova Riekert Chair and professor of pediatrics to start a new Division of Reproductive Sciences. He has published over 300 original articles and has been funded by two MERIT Awards, RO1 grants and a Program Project Grants from NIH, and grants from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and March of Dimes Foundation. His research mission has been to define the molecular road map to embryo-uterine interactions during pregnancy. His recent work published in Developmental Cell, Nat Med, PNAS and JCI provides novel information in the context of cell polarity in implantation, ectopic pregnancy, progesterone resistance to pregnancy failure and premature decidual senescence in preterm delivery. In 2008, Dr. Dey received Carl G. Hartman Award, the highest honor of the Society for the Study of Reproduction. In 2009, he received IVI Award sponsored by Schering-Plough for best contribution in Reproductive Medicine.

    He has graduated seven PhD students and mentored over 40 postdoctoral fellows, 20 of whom are currently independent faculty members, and most others are investigators in major research institutions. His laboratory currently consists of one junior faculty, four postdoctoral fellows, one MD/PhD student, and two research assistants.

    Education and Training

    BSc: Presidency College, Calcutta, India, 1965.

    MSc:
    University of Calcutta, India, 1967.

    PhD:
    University of Calcutta, India, 1972.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    No photo available

    Brian Gebelein, PhD

    studies how the Hox genes specify distinct cell fates within the nervous system using the fruit fly as a model organism. His long-term goal is to use a combination of genetic and biochemical approaches to understand how Hox factors interact with neuronal transcription factors to regulate downstream target genes that pattern the nervous system and ultimately control cellular function and behavior.
    Visit the Gebelein Lab.

    513-636-3366
    brian.gebelein@cchmc.org

    Brian Gebelein, PhD

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-3366

    Email: brian.gebelein@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Education and Training

    BS: University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, 1994.

    PhD: Mayo Graduate School, Rochester, MN, 2000.

    Postdoctoral Fellow: Molecular mechanisms of Hox specificity in Drosophila melanogaster, Columbia University.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Geraldine Guasch.

    Geraldine Guasch, PhD

    uses the mouse as a model system to investigate the role of stem cells in tumor development. The long-term goal of the lab is to understand whether skin cancers arise from stem cells and whether tumors maintain stem cells, using a combination of genetics and biochemical studies.
    Visit the Guasch Lab.

    513-803-2607
    geraldine.guasch@cchmc.org

    Geraldine Guasch, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-2607

    Email: geraldine.guasch@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Research Interests

    Role of stem cells in tumor development; skin cancers; genetics; biochemical studies

    Visit the Guasch Lab.

    Education and Training

    Postdoctoral research fellow: The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, 2002-2008.

    PhD: University of Aix-Marseille, France, Immunology/Oncology, 2002.

    BS: University Montpellier II, France, Biochemistry, 1997.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Rashmi Hegde.

    Rashmi S. Hegde, PhD

    studies molecular mechanisms involved in embryonic organ development and how the aberrant functioning of these processes can lead to developmental disorders as well as adult disease states such as cancer. This knowledge is then utilized in the rational design of therapeutic strategies. We use a variety of experimental techniques including biochemistry, cell biology and structural biology.
    Visit the Hedge Lab.

    513-636-5947
    rashmi.hegde@cchmc.org

    Rashmi S. Hegde, PhD

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-5947

    Fax: 513-636-6772

    Email: rashmi.hegde@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Research in the Hegde Laboratory is aimed at understanding the structural basis for specificity in macromolecular interactions. Currently the two main areas of interest in the laboratory are: proteins involved in early vertebrate development; proteins involved in the life- and infection-cycles of the cancer-associated papillomaviruses.

    Research Interests

    Molecular mechanisms underlying early stages in embryonic organ development; molecular basis of developmental defects and cancer; protein-DNA interactions; X-ray crystallography.

    Visit the Hegde Lab.

    Biography

    Rashmi Hegde received her PhD in medicinal chemistry from the University of Pittsburgh in 1989. She received post-doctoral training in the Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry at Yale University, where she was a fellow of the National Cancer Center. She was appointed assistant professor of biochemistry at New York University School of Medicine and the Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine in 1994. She is presently a full professor in the Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and the Division of Developmental Biology at Children's Hospital Research Foundation.

    Education and Training

    PhD: University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 1989.

    Post-doctoral Fellowship: Yale University, 1989-1994.

    Assistant Professor: New York University School of Medicine, Skirball Institute, 1994-2000.

    Associate Professor: Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 2001-2007.

    Professor: Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 2008-present.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Stacey Huppert.

    Stacey S. Huppert, PhD

    investigates the cellular contribution and molecular factors required for assembly of the three-dimensional hepatic architecture, during liver development, homeostasis and regeneration. Defining the critical elements involved in formation and repair processes of the liver are necessary not only to understand biology, but also to identify the cellular and molecular targets involved in congenital and chronic liver diseases.

    Visit the Huppert Lab

    513-803-3871
    stacey.huppert@cchmc.org

    Stacey S. Huppert, PhD

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-3871

    Email: stacey.huppert@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Hepatic development and regeneration; three-dimensional hepatic architecture; Notch signaling; hepatobiliary disease

    Visit the Huppert Lab.

    Education and Training

    BS: Genetic Biology,Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 1992.

    PhD: Genetics, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 1998.

    Postdoctoral Fellow: Developmental Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 2003.

    Instructor: Developmental Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 2005.

    Assistant Professor: Cell and Developmental Biology, Center for Stem Cell Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, 2012.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Rulang Jiang.

    Rulang Jiang, PhD

    is a developmental biologist directing research programs in craniofacial biology. His lab generates and uses mutant mouse models to investigate the genetic and developmental basis of craniofacial birth defects, including cleft lip, cleft palate, tooth defects, and other craniofacial deformities. His lab also studies development of joints, including long bone joints in the limb and the temporomandibular joint of the jaw.

    Visit the Jiang Lab.

    513-636-3212
    rulang.jiang@cchmc.org

    Rulang Jiang, PhD

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-3212

    Email: rulang.jiang@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Education and Training

    BS: Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, China, 1984.

    MS: Genetics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China, 1987.

    PhD: Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT, 1995.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Vladimir Kalinichenko.

    Vladimir V. Kalinichenko, MD, PhD

    is investigating the transcriptional regulation of epithelial and endothelial cell functions during lung embryonic development and lung carcinogenesis. He studies the winged helix/forkhead box (Fox) proteins and their role in regulating cell signaling pathways required for cellular proliferation, differentiation, motility and survival, ultimately identifying novel mechanisms that cause human lung malformations and promote lung cancer formation.

    513-636-4822
    vladimir.kalinichenko@cchmc.org

    Vladimir V. Kalinichenko, MD, PhD

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4822

    Fax: 513-636-2423

    Email: vladimir.kalinichenko@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Lung development; cell proliferation; carcinogenesis; transcriptional regulation of gene expression.

    Research Interests

    Transcriptional regulation of epithelial and endothelial cell functions during lung embryonic development and lung carcinogenesis; winged helix/forkhead box (Fox) proteins and their role in regulating cell signaling pathways required for cellular proliferation, differentiation, motility and survival; identify and increase understanding of currently unknown mechanisms that cause human lung malformations and promote lung cancer formation.

    Education and Training

    MD: Russian State Medical University, Moscow, Russia, 1993.

    PhD: Russian State Medical University, Moscow, Russia, 1995.

    Fellowship: From the European Soros Foundation, 1995.

    Postdoctoral: University of Illinois at Chicago, Center for Molecular Biology, IL, 2000.

    Postdoctoral: University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Molecular Genetics, IL, 2002.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Matthew Kofron.

    J. Matthew Kofron, PhD Research Associate, Division of Developmental Biology

    513-636-4425
    matthew.kofron@cchmc.org

    J. Matthew Kofron, PhD

    Research Associate, Division of Developmental Biology

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4425

    Fax: 513-636-4317

    Email: matthew.kofron@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Early vertebrate patterning; germ layer formation

    Education and Training

    PhD: University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 1999.

    Publications

    A photo of Yu Lan.

    Yu Lan, PhD

    is interested in understanding the genetic basis and developmental mechanisms of structural birth defects. Specifically, Dr. Lan investigates the molecular pathways governing normal palate development in laboratory mice. Her ongoing investigations focus on delineating the molecular pathways involving these factors in palate development using a combination of genetic, embryological, and biochemical approaches.

    513-803-7842
    yu.lan@cchmc.org

    Yu Lan, PhD

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Surgery

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-7842

    Email: yu.lan@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Biography

    Yu Lan, PhD, is a developmental geneticist interested in understanding the genetic basis and developmental mechanisms of structural birth defects. Cleft palate is one of the most common birth defects in humans. To understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cleft palate pathogenesis, we have been investigating the molecular pathways governing normal palate development in the laboratory mice.

    Through gene expression screening, we have identified several putative transcription factor genes with distinct and dynamic expression patterns in the developing mouse palate. Using the gene targeting technology, we have generated mice carrying null or conditional null mutations in some of these transcription factor genes. Analyses of the mutant mice revealed that several of these transcription factors, such as Osr1 and Osr2, play essential roles in palate development. Ongoing investigations focus on delineating the molecular pathways involving these factors in palate development using a combination of genetic, embryological, and biochemical approaches.

    Education and Training

    PhD: University of Maine, Orono, ME.

    Post-doc training: Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT; The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME.

    Publications

    Grants

    Genetic Basis of Cleft Lip and Palate. Co-Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Apr 2003 - Jan 2013. #R01 DE015207.

    Molecular Genetic Analysis of Craniofacial Development. Co-Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Apr 2000 - Jun 2015. #R01 DE013681.

    A photo of Richard Lang.

    Richard A. Lang, PhD Director of the Visual Systems Group

    has two major research interests. First, we are interested in mechanisms of signaling and morphogenesis in early eye development. Second, we investigate the role macrophages play in regulating vascularity during development and homeostasis.
    Visit the Lang Lab.

    513-636-2700
    richard.lang@cchmc.org

    Richard A. Lang, PhD

    Director of the Visual Systems Group

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-2700

    Fax: 513-803-0740

    Email: richard.lang@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Wnt Ligands in Tumorigenesis; Vascular Regression and Tissue Regeneration; Lens Induction and Morphogenesis 

    Visit the Lang Lab.

    Education and Training

    BSc: 1984 (with honors), University of Melbourne, Australia. Co-major in genetics and biochemistry.

    PhD: 1988, University of Melbourne, Australia, at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research under Drs. AR Dunn and TJ Gonda.

    Postdoctoral Fellow: 1989-92, The G.W. Hooper Research Foundation, University of California, San Francisco under Dr. JM Bishop. Studied the role of the macrophage in developmentally programmed tissue remodeling.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Rho GTPases in early eye development. National Institute of Health. Apr 2007- Mar 2012. #R01 EY017848. 

    Macrophage and tumor angiogenesis. Co-Principal Investigator. National Institute of Health. Dec 2007- Nov 2012. #R01 CA131270.

    Targeting Survival Factors for Ocular Neovascularization. National Institute of Health. Apr 2008- Mar 2012. #R01 EY012609.

    CRIM1-β-catenin-Cadherin interactions in Eye Development and Disease. MPI with Dr. Rashmi Hegde of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. National Institute of Health. Apr 2009- Mar 2014. #R01 EY019377.

    Sox2 and Pax6 in Eye development. Co-Principal Investigator. US-Israel Binational Science Foundation.  
    Feb 2009- Jan 2013. 

    Eyes absent phosphatase inhibitors in eye disease. MPI with Dr. Rashmi Hegde of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. National Institute of Health. Apr 2009- Mar 2014. #R21 EY019125.
    A photo of James Lessard, MD.

    James L. Lessard, PhD

    assesses the functional and developmental significance of the four distinct forms of muscle actins. His lab also studies the regulation of visceral smooth muscle growth and differentiation.

    513-636-8308
    james.lessard@cchmc.org

    James L. Lessard, PhD

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-8308

    Fax: 513-636-4317

    Email: james.lessard@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Gene regulation; gene targeting

    Education and Training

    PhD: Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisc., 1970.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    Xinhua Lin, PhD.

    Xinhua Lin, PhD

    is interested in cell-cell signaling mechanisms that control tissue patterning during development. His lab focuses on the role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in morphogen distribution and signaling. The Lin lab also studies the molecular mechanisms of Wnt signaling in development.
    Visit the Lin lab site.

    513-636-2144
    xinhua.lin@cchmc.org

    Xinhua Lin, PhD

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-2144

    Fax: 513-636-4317

    Email: xinhua.lin@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Dr. Xinhua Lin's research is directed toward understanding the mechanisms governing the regulation of cell-cell signaling by extracellular molecules that play essential roles in coordinating cell growth and differentiation. He is focusing particularly on the role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) in cell-cell signaling and working toward the identification of molecules that modulate the function of two key signaling molecules, Wnt/Wingless (Wg), Hedgehog (Hh).

    Biography

    Xinhua Lin, PhD, completed his doctoral work at the Washington University with Thomas. F. Deuel, where he studied the transcriptional regulation of Platelet-derived growth factor A-chain gene. He then went to the Dr. Norbert Perrimon lab at Harvard Medical School, where he initiated his work on the role of heparan sulfate proteoglycan in cell-cell signaling in Drosophila.

    Dr. Lin has identified and characterized two mutations, sugarless and sulfateless, which occur in the genes that encode essential enzymes for the biosynthesis of heparin/heparin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (HSPG). Analyses of these mutants led to the demonstration that HSPGs play critical roles in the signaling activities of several growth factors including Wg, Hh and FGF. Dr. Lin further demonstrated that glypican members of HSPG play key roles in Wg signaling and the formation of Wg morphogen gradient. He became an assistant professor in April, 2000, at the Children's Hospital Medical Center of Cincinnati. His lab is interested in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of cell-cell signaling, focusing on the role of HSPG in signaling and the morphogen gradient formation of the Wg and Hh proteins.

    Education and Training

    PhD: Washington University, St. Louis, MO, 1995. 

    MS: Shanghai Institute of Cell Biology, Academia Sinica, P.R. China, 1987.

    BS: Hangchou University, Hangchou, P.R. China, 1984. 

    Fellowship: Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Howard Hughes Medical Institute/Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA, 1995-2000.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    No photo available

    Jun Ma, PhD

    investigates fundamental mechanisms of development through a combination of quantitative experimental approaches and theoretical and simulation approaches. One major focus of Ma’s lab concerns the questions of how morphogen gradients are established, and how precise positional information is encoded by these gradients and interpreted by cells in developing tissues.

    513-636-7977
    jun.ma@cchmc.org

    Jun Ma, PhD

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-7977

    Fax: 513-636-4317

    Email: jun.ma@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Molecular mechanisms of gene regulation and embryonic development

    Education and Training

    PhD: Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 1983-1988 (degree awarded 1990).

    BS: Peking University, 1978-1982.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Probing the Robustness of a Developmental System. National Science Foundation.  May 2009 - Apr 2013.  #IOS-0843424.
    DefaultUserSmall

    Christopher N. Mayhew, PhD Co-Director, Pluripotent Stem Cell Facility

    is co-director of the Pluripotent Stem Cell Facility. His lab functions as a core facility providing access for Cincinnati Children's / University of Cincinnati investigators to highly quality controlled human pluripotent stem cells, including human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. In addition, the lab provides training in the culture and manipulation of human pluripotent stem cells to investigators. 

    513-636-3744
    christopher.mayhew@cchmc.org

    Christopher N. Mayhew, PhD

    Co-Director, Pluripotent Stem Cell Facility

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-3744

    Email: christopher.mayhew@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Pluripotent stem cell biology

    Education and Training

    PhD: University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK 2000.

    Publications

    No photo available

    Masato Nakafuku MD, PhD Ohio Eminent Scholar

    is focused on the development and regeneration of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). He is seeking to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying normal development of the CNS and is also interested in applying advancement of knowledge on neural development for developing novel therapeutic strategies to cure neurological diseases.
    Visit the Nakafuku Lab.

    513-636-9389
    masato.nakafuku@cchmc.org

    Masato Nakafuku MD, PhD

    Ohio Eminent Scholar

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-9389

    Fax: 513-636-4317

    Email: masato.nakafuku@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Development and regeneration of the central nervous system (CNS); therapeutic strategies for neurological diseases

    Visit the Nakafuku Lab.

    Education and Training

    PhD: Graduate School of Medical Sciences, University of Tokyo, 1988.

    MD: The University of Kanazawa School of Medicine, 1984.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Takahisa Nakamura.

    Takahisa Nakamura, PhD

    Research goal is to address questions concerning why and how inflammatory responses are initiated, coordinated, and thus involved in the development of obesity-induced metabolic diseases.

    513-636-4744
    takahisa.nakamura@cchmc.org

    Takahisa Nakamura, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4744

    Email: takahisa.nakamura@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    RNA-related inflammation in obesity and metabolic diseases 

    Biography

    Dr. Nakamura received his PhD from the University of Tokyo in 2003. He completed postdoctoral training in the laboratory of Dr. Gökhan S. Hotamisligil at Harvard School of Public Health in 2013, followed by his faculty appointment at Cincinnati Children's Hospital in 2013.

    Education and Training

    PhD: University of Tokyo, 2003.

    Postdoctoral Fellow: University of Tokyo, 2003-2006

    Research Fellow: Harvard University, 2006-2010

    Research Associate: Harvard University, 2010-2013

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Functional analysis of PKR, JNK, and RISC in metabolic inflammation and homeostasis. Principal Investigator. American Heart Association, Scientist Development Grant. Jan 2012 – Dec 2014.

    Analysis of pathogenic double-stranded RNA in chronic inflammatory diseases. Principal Investigator. Japan Science and Technology Agency, PRESTO. Feb 2013 – Mar 2016.
    A photo of Satoshi Namekawa.

    Satoshi H. Namekawa, PhD

    examines the mechanisms and evolution of epigenetic events during mammalian reproduction, using a male germ cell model.
    Visit the Namekawa Lab

    513-803-1377
    satoshi.namekawa@cchmc.org

    Satoshi H. Namekawa, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-1377

    Fax: 513-803-1160

    Email: satoshi.namekawa@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    The long-term goal of my research is to understand the mechanisms and evolution of epigenetic events during mammalian reproduction. One of our focus areas is epigenetic regulation of sex chromosomes in germ cell development. Recently, my laboratory demonstrated that DNA damage response pathways trigger epigenetic programming on the sex chromosomes in germ cells. An on-going direction of my laboratory is to pursue a general link between DNA damage response pathways and epigenetic programming. Another goal of my laboratory is to identify novel factors and related pathways that control epigenetic programming during mouse reproduction, especially focusing on the events occurring on sex chromosomes during spermatogenesis as well as the regulatory mechanisms in germline stem cells.

    Visit the Namekawa Lab

    Biography

    Dr. Namekawa received his PhD from Tokyo University of Science in 2005. He completed postdoctoral training in the laboratory of Dr. Jeannie T. Lee at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in 2009, followed by his faculty appointment at Cincinnati Children's in 2009. He is funded by NIH R01 Award and the Basil O’Connor Award from March of Dimes Foundation.

    Education and Training

    PhD: Tokyo University of Science, Japan, 2005.

    BS: Tokyo University of Science, Japan, 2000.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Joo-Seop Park.

    Joo-Seop Park, PhD

    is interested in understanding how progenitor cells maintain their multi-potent status and how they differentiate into different types of cells during organogenesis of the mammalian kidney and bladder. His lab studies transcriptional and epigenetic controls of cis-regulatory modules that act downstream of various signaling pathways.

    513-803-7871
    joo-seop.park@cchmc.org

    Joo-Seop Park, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Surgery

    Phone: 513-803-7871

    Email: joo-seop.park@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Molecular biology; genetics 

    Biography

    Joo-Seop Park, PhD is an assistant professor in the Divisions of Pediatric Urology and Developmental Biology at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. He received his bachelor's in pharmacy from Seoul National University in Seoul, South Korea. He subsequently studied the regulation of gene transcription with Dr. Jeffrey W. Roberts at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY where he obtained his doctorate in Molecular Biology and Genetics in 2004. Dr. Park then went on to postdoctoral training with Dr. Andrew P. McMahon at Harvard University where he was awarded fellowships from the National Kidney Foundation and the Charles King Trust to study mammalian kidney development.

    Dr. Park is interested in understanding how progenitor cells maintain their multi-potent status and how they differentiate into different types of cells during organogenesis of the mammalian kidney and bladder. His lab studies transcriptional and epigenetic controls of cis-regulatory modules that act downstream of various signaling pathways.

    Education and Training

    PhD: Molecular Biology, Cornell University.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Steven Potter.

    S. Steven Potter, PhD

    is interested in kidney and craniofacial development and disease. He uses a combination of laser capture microdissection, microarrays, and next generation sequencing, applied to both mouse models and human biopsy disease samples.
    Visit the Potter Lab.

    513-636-4850
    steve.potter@cchmc.org

    S. Steven Potter, PhD

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4850

    Fax: 513-636-4317

    Email: steve.potter@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Kidney development and disease; Hox genes; craniofacial development; creation of an atlas of global gene expression patterns in the multiple compartments of the developing kidney; analysis of perturbed gene expression patterns in the kidney glomeruli of patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis; craniofacial development using mutant mice, laser capture microdissection, next generation sequencing, and microarrays; recombineering to target multiple Hox genes at once

    Visit the Potter Lab.

    Education and Training

    BA: University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), 1971.

    PhD: University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1976.

    Postdoctoral Fellowship: Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. 1976-1978.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Noah Shroyer.

    Noah F. Shroyer, PhD

    is focused on understanding development and diseases of the intestine. He seeks to understand the molecular mechanisms of intestinal epithelial differentiation, and to apply this knowledge to gain insight into major diseases of the intestine such as colon cancer and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Visit the Shroyer Lab.

    513-636-0129
    noah.shroyer@cchmc.org

    Noah F. Shroyer, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-0129

    Fax: 513-636-5581

    Email: noah.shroyer@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Intestinal epithelial development; colon cancer; inflammatory bowel disease.

    Visit the Shroyer Lab.

    Education and Training

    BS: Microbiology and Biochemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 1995.

    PhD: Cell and Molecular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, 2001.

    Postdoctoral: Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, 2001-2005.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    The role of ATOH1 as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. Primary Investigator. National Cancer Institute. Jan 2010 - Dec 2014. #R01 CA142826.
    A photo of Rolf Stottmann.

    Rolf W. Stottmann, PhD

    is a developmental geneticist with an interest in using animal models to understand the genetic basis of human congenital defects. His lab is using both forward and reverse genetics to identify novel loci required for normal development. Further studies are then done to study the underlying molecular mechanism(s) leading to the defect. Specific areas of interest are cortical neuron development and craniofacial genetics.
    Visit the Stottmann Lab.

    513-636-7136
    rolf.stottmann@cchmc.org

    Rolf W. Stottmann, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-7136

    Email: rolf.stottmann@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Developmental neurobiology; genetics; animal models of human congenital defects

    Visit the Stottmann Lab

    Education and Training

    BS: University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 1995.

    MS: University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 1997.

    PhD: Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, 2004.

    Postdoctoral Training: Brigham & Women’s Hospital; Harvard Medical School.

    Publications

    A photo of Saulius Sumanas.

    Saulius Sumanas, PhD

    utilizes zebrafish as a model system to study molecular mechanisms of the embryonic vasculature formation.
    Visit the Sumanas Lab.

    513-803-0435
    saulius.sumanas@cchmc.org

    Saulius Sumanas, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-0435

    Fax: 513-636-4317

    Email: saulius.sumanas@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Molecular mechanisms of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis

    Visit the Sumanas Lab.

    Education and Training

    BS: Vilnius University, Biochemistry, Vilnius, Lithuania, 1995.

    PhD: University of Minnesota, Department of Biochemistry, Minneapolis / St. Paul, MN, 2000.

    Postdoctoral Fellow: University of California, Los Angeles, 2002-2007.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Timothy Vogel.

    Timothy W. Vogel, MD

    joined the Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery at Cincinnati Children’s in 2013 as an assistant professor of neurosurgery and developmental biology.
    Visit the Vogel Lab.

    513-636-4726
    timothy.vogel@cchmc.org

    Timothy W. Vogel, MD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Neurosurgery

    Phone: 513-636-4726

    Email: timothy.vogel@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Biography

    Tim Vogel, MD, joined the Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery at Cincinnati Children’s in 2013 as an assistant professor of neurosurgery and developmental biology. Dr. Vogel is a graduate of Princeton University and Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons. Dr. Vogel completed his residency at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in 2011. He then completed a minimally invasive fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital at Harvard University, followed by a pediatric neurosurgery fellowship at St Louis Children’s Hospital at Washington University in St. Louis.

    Dr. Vogel specializes in craniofacial surgery and the use of endoscopy in the minimally invasive treatment of children. He also utilizes endoscopy and his expertise with minimally invasive surgery to treat hydrocephalus and certain tumors of the brain.

    In addition to his clinical activities, Dr. Vogel is a principal investigator in the Division of Developmental Biology focused on human and molecular genetics of hydrocephalus and other neurodevelopmental disorders. Dr. Vogel has completed postdoctoral fellowships for the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at the University of Iowa and at Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Vogel is focused on cilia (hair like structures in the brain) and their contribution to hydrocephalus during development. He utilizes basic and translational applications to study cellular signaling in hydrocephalus with the goal of developing innovative treatment strategies for this disease.

    Dr. Vogel is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, the American Society of Craniofacial Surgery, the American Society of Human Genetics, the Ciliopathy Alliance, and the Congress of Neurological Society and the Society of Neuroscience.

    Education and Training

    MD: Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, 2005.

    Residency: University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA, 2011.

    Research Fellowship: Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 2013.

    Pediatric Neurosurgery Fellowship: St. Louis Children’s Hospital, Washington University in St. Louis, Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, St. Louis, MO, 2013.

    Minimally Invasive Fellowship: Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard University, Department of Neurosurgery, Boston, MA, 2012.

    Postdoctoral Research Fellowship: Harvard Medical School, Harvard University, Boston, MA, 2012.

    Postdoctoral Research Fellowship: Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, 2010.

    Publications

    Grants

    Primary cilia signaling in CNS progenitors and their role in neonatal hydrocephalus. Principal Investigator. K12 Neurosurgeon Research Career Development Program (NRCDP); National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS); National Institutes of Health (NIH); and Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School. Jan 2014 – Jan 2017.

    Role of neural progenitor cells in the development of neonatal hydrocephalus. Principal Investigator. Hydrocephalus Association’s CSF Production, Flow and Regulation, Therapeutics and Diagnostics Award. Sep 2013-Sep 2016.

    Role of progenitor cells in the development of congenital hydrocephalus. Collaborator. National Institutes of Health. Sep 2013-Sep 2016.

    A photo of James Wells, PhD.

    James M. Wells, PhD Director, Basic Research, Division of Endocrinology

    researches the molecular mechanisms of endoderm organogenesis in mouse and humans. The goal of this work is to identify the molecular basis of congenital defects affecting the pancreas, liver, and biliary system and to direct the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) into therapeutic cells for replacement therapies, such as transplantable pancreatic beta cells for patients with type-1 diabetes.
    Visit the Wells Lab.

    513-636-8767
    james.wells@cchmc.org

    James M. Wells, PhD

    Director, Basic Research, Division of Endocrinology

    Director, Pluripotent Stem Cell Center

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-8767

    Fax: 513-636-4317

    Email: james.wells@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    identifying the molecular mechanisms involved in the development of the pancreas, liver and biliary system; replacement therapies, such as transplantable pancreatic beta cells for patients with type-1 diabetes; regeneration of adult tissues

    Visit the Wells Lab.

    Biography

    The focus of his teams basic research has been to identify the molecular mechanisms involved in the embryonic development of endocrine cells including pancreatic beta cells and tissues of the gastrointestinal tract. Their translational projects have focused on identifying new approaches to improve child health in several ways: 1. To identify and use embryonic pathways to generate complex, three-dimensional organ tissues from pluripotent stem cells, 2. Use these tissues to develop new in vitro human models for diabetes and digestive disease research and 3. Develop long-term, therapeutic strategies for cell and tissue-replacement therapies.

    Education and Training

    BS: Biochemistry, Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Maine, Orono, ME, 1987.

    PhD: Graduate program in Genetics, SUNY at Stony Brook, New York, 1995.

    Postdoctoral Fellow: Harvard University, Cambridge MA, 1996 - 2001. 

    Publications

    View Dr. Wells PubMed Publications.

    Grants

    Single Cell Dissection of Human Intestine Development. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Heath. Sept 2013 – Aug 2018. NIH 1R01DK098350.

    Control of human endocrine cell development. Contact Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Heath. April 2012 – March 2017. NIH 1R01DK092456-01.

    Develop Innovative Translational Tools to Study Enteroendocrine Function in Human Intestine and Applications to Diabetes Drug Discovery. Principal Investigator. Eli Lilly Internal Sponsors: Drs. Melissa Thomas and Hsiu Chiung-Yang. Dec 2011 – Nov 2013.

    Generating Human Intestinal Organoids with an ENS. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Sept 2012 – Aug 2014. NIH 1U18NS080815-01.

    Generating 3-D lung organoids in vitro. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Sept 2012 – Aug 2014. NIH 1R21 HL115372-01.

    KLF5 regulation of intestinal development and stem cell homeostasis. Co-Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Aug 2011 – July 2015. NIH 1R01 DK092306-01.

    Transcriptional Control of Placental Differentiation. Co-Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Feb 2011 – Jan 2016. NIH R01 HD065339.

    A photo of Jeffrey Whitsett.

    Jeffrey A. Whitsett, MD Co-Director, Perinatal Institute

    investigates the hierarchy of transcriptional controls and signaling cascades which determine commitment of progenitor cells that produce the differentiated epithelial cells lining the primordial and mature respiratory tract. The goal of his research is to provide insight into the pathogenesis of acute and chronic lung disorders. The role of surfactant in innate host defense and lung function is also an ongoing interest.
    Visit the Whitsett Lab.

    513-803-2790
    jeffrey.whitsett@cchmc.org

    Jeffrey A. Whitsett, MD

    Co-Director, Perinatal Institute

    Chief, Section of Neonatology, Perinatal and Pulmonary Biology

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-2790

    Fax: 513-636-7868

    Email: jeffrey.whitsett@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Cystic fibrosis research; lung morphogenesis; control of gene expression in the respiratory epithelium; gene delivery and therapy 

    Visit the Whitsett Lab.

    Biography

    Jeffrey A. Whitsett, MD, is chief of the Section of Neonatology, Perinatal and Pulmonary Biology at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

    Dr. Whitsett received his medical degree from Columbia University, in New York, and has been a faculty member since 1977. He is internationally known for his research in pulmonary medicine, as well as for his clinical expertise in neonatology.

    Dr. Whitsett has made a series of groundbreaking contributions in pulmonary medicine. His major pioneering work has been on surfactant proteins A, B, C and D, cloning their genes, and clarifying their roles in lung development.

    Throughout his career, Dr. Whitsett has had the remarkable ability to move from molecular biology, to animal models, to diagnosis and therapy of human disease. He played a critical role in making surfactant protein replacement a routine tool for treating immature lungs and respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants. His laboratory has contributed to the identification of a number of genes critical for lung formation and function. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis were shown to cause acute and chronic lung disease in infants and adults.

    Dr. Whitsett is a member of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences and is the recipient of the Mead Johnson Award, a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Merit Award, the first Julius Comroe Lectureship in Pulmonary Research from FASEB, the William Cooper Procter Award from Cincinnati Children's, the Amberson Lecture Award of the American Thoracic Society, the prestigious Daniel Drake Medal for scientific contributions from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, the International Arvo Ylppö Medal from the Finnish Foundation for Pediatric Research and the Grand Hamdan International Award on Neonatal Medicine from the United Arab Emirates.

    Dr. Whitsett is the author of more than 400 papers in both the basic science and clinical literature.

    Education and Training

    MD: Columbia University, New York, NY, 1973.

    Residency: Pediatrics, Mt. Sinai Hospital, New York City, 1974 to 1976.

    Fellowship: Neonatology, Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 1976 to 1977.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Dan Wiginton.

    Dan Wiginton, PhD

    uses transgenic and gene knockout mouse models to investigate in vivo mechanisms of gene regulation during cell differentiation and tissue development, with current focus on the intestinal epithelium. Special interest is the role of Onecut factors in intestinal development and function.
    Visit the Wiginton Lab.

    513-636-4547
    dan.wiginton@cchmc.org

    Dan Wiginton, PhD

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4547

    Fax: 513-636-4317

    Email: dan.wiginton@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Gene regulation and development; regulatory factor networks; enhancers; chromatin Modulation

    Visit the Wiginton Lab.

    Biography

    Dan Wiginton, PhD, has been in the Department of Pediatrics at Children's Hospital and the University of Cincinnati since 1984. The principal focus of his work during that time has been basic research and research training of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. Dr. Wiginton's current research interests are directed toward an understanding of the genetic regulatory networks that govern tissue and organ development, as well as the cell-type specific differentiation that underlies this development.

    Dr. Wiginton's lab uses the human adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene as a model system to investigate tissue-specific gene expression and the mechanisms that govern it. Transgenic mouse technology has been utilized heavily in these studies, allowing investigation of these questions in vivo. With the ADA model, studies have been carried out to understand thymocyte differentiation in thymus (critical to development of the immune system) and epithelial development in small intestine (critical to normal nutrient utilization).

    Prior to coming to Cincinnati, Dr. Wiginton carried out postdoctoral training at the University of Kentucky in Lexington and at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in San Antonio under Dr. John Hutton. While at these institutions, Dr. Wiginton's research focused on characterization of the normal human ADA protein and gene, and defects in ADA structure and function that cause severe combined immunodeficiency disease(SCID). These studies included collaborations in very early studies directed toward stem cell gene therapy to correct ADA-deficient SCID. Dr. Wiginton carried out his graduate studies at the University of Texas (Austin) under Dr. William Shive. He was awarded a PhD in Biochemistry in 1978, for studies in the area of bacterial enzyme expression and regulation. These studies investigated the biosynthesis and intermediary metabolism of the branched-chain amino acids (valine/leucine/isoleucine).

    Education and Training

    PhD: The University of Texas at Austin, 1978.

    Postdoctoral Fellowship: University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 1978-1980.

    Fellow / Chemist: Dept. of Hematology, UTHSC-San Antonio and Audie Murphy VA Hospital, San Antonio, TX, 1980-1984.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Chunyue Yin.

    Chunyue Yin, PhD

    studies the cellular and molecular basis of liver development and disease pathogenesis. She focuses on hepatic stellate cells, the key cell type responsible for hepatic fibrogenesis. She utilizes the zebrafish model to investigate the regulation of hepatic stellate cells during liver development and alcoholic liver injury, and their function in liver regeneration. Research in congenital biliary diseases is a second lab focus.

    Visit the Yin Lab.

    513-803-8096
    chunyue.yin@cchmc.org

    Chunyue Yin, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-8096

    Email: chunyue.yin@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Liver development; hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis; hepatic stellate cells; stem cells and regeneration; congenital biliary diseases; zebrafish genetics

    Visit the Yin Lab.

    Biography

    Dr. Yin conducted her doctoral research in Dr. Lilianna Solnica-Krezel’s laboratory at Vanderbilt University, where she investigated the molecular regulation of cell movements during zebrafish gastrulation and revealed the impact of gastrulation movements on somite development. In parallel, she participated in a forward genetic screen to identify novel regulators of zebrafish early development. She identified the calamity mutant that exhibits defects in notochord formation and pigmentation. Subsequent positional cloning revealed that a mutation in the atp7a gene, the zebrafish homolog of the human Menkes Disease gene, was responsible for the calamity mutant phenotypes. 

    With a strong interest in building zebrafish models for human diseases, she decided to conduct her postdoctoral research in Dr. Didier Stainier’s laboratory, which is at the forefront of zebrafish digestive organ research. She received a Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation to study pancreas development in zebrafish hands-off/han mutants that carry a mutation in the transcription factor gene hand2. Her research led to the discovery that the defective pancreatic development in han mutants is due to a failure in asymmetric gut looping. She also showed that gut-looping morphogenesis is dependent on extracellular matrix remodeling and revealed novel roles for Hand2 in this process. This work was published in Developmental Cell in 2010. Her work is now focused on the hepatic stellate cells and hepatic biliary cells. She has developed transgenic lines that mark these cell types and will use them and related reagents to characterize the cellular behaviors of these cells in liver development and disease, as well as the underlying molecular regulations.

    Education and Training

    BS: Evolution and Ecology, Fudan University, Shanghai, China, 2001.

    PhD: Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 2007.

    Postdoctoral fellow: Developmental Biology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 2012.

    Publications

    View PubMed publications
    A photo of Yutaka Yoshida.

    Yutaka Yoshida, PhD

    investigates the molecular mechanisms of neural circuit formation in the developing spinal cord, using many techniques including molecular biology, mouse genetics, biochemistry, and electrophysiology.
    Visit the Yoshida Lab.

    513-803-0943
    yutaka.yoshida@cchmc.org

    Yutaka Yoshida, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-0943

    Email: yutaka.yoshida@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Molecular mechanisms of neural circuit formation in the developing spinal cord.

    Visit the Yoshida Lab.

    Education and Training

    BS: Keio University, 1994.

    PhD: University of Tokyo, 1999.

    Postdoctoral fellow: University of Tokyo, 1999-2002; Columbia University, 2002-2007.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Regulation of Sensory-Motor Connectivity by Semaphorin-Plexin Signaling. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Apr 2009 - Mar 2014. #R01NS065048.
    A photo of Aaron Zorn.

    Aaron M. Zorn, PhD Associate Director, Digestive Health Center

    leads the Zorn lab with the research goal to understand the development of the lung, liver, pancreas and gastrointestinal tract, which are derived from the embryonic endoderm. We use frog embryos to investigate the genetic pathways underlying the process of organogenesis. The research in this Lab helps our understanding of congenital diseases in these organs and the ability to development stem cells therapies.
    Visit the Zorn Lab.

    513-636-3770
    aaron.zorn@cchmc.org

    Aaron M. Zorn, PhD

    Associate Director, Digestive Health Center

    Co-Director, Xenbase

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-3770

    Fax: 513-636-4317

    Email: aaron.zorn@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Research

    Development of lung, liver, pancreas and gastrointestinal tract; vertebrate embryology

    Visit the Zorn Lab Site.

    Education and Training

    BSc University of Toronto, Canada.

    PhD University of Texas, Austin, Texas, 1995.

    Postdoctoral Wellcome Trust Cancer Research Campaign Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England, 1996-1999.

    Research Fellow Wellcome Trust Gurdon Institute, Universtiy of Cambridge, Cambridge, England, 1999-2002.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Deciphering the gene regulatory network controlling vertebrate endodermal fates. Co-Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. July 2012 - June 2017. #R01 HD73179.

    Role of Osr transcription factors in lung specification.  Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. July 2012 - June 2017. #R01 HL114898.

    Xenbase a Xenopus Model Organism Database
    . Co-Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. June 2009 - May 2015. P41 HD64556.

    Production, Validation and Distribution of the Xenopus ORFeome
    . Co-Investigator. National Institutes of Health.  July 2011 - June 2016. #R01 HD069352A.

    Emeritus

    No photo available

    Harold Kalter, PhD

    Academic Information

    N/A

    Emeritus, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

    A photo of William Scott.

    William J. Scott, DVM, PhD

    focuses on the effects of human teratogens in rodents; specifically, the pattern formation along the anterior (thumb)/posterior (pinky) axis affected by drug exposure.
    Visit the Scott lab site.

    513-636-8173
    william.scott@cchmc.org

    William J. Scott, DVM, PhD

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-8173

    Email: william.scott@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Molecular basis of pattern formation in the developing limb, especially the upset of this program leading to limb malformations; role that monovalent ions, particularly protons, play in this process is under scrutiny with major emphasis on ion regulatory processes that control intracellular pH

    Education and Training

    DVM: University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 1961.

    PhD: Anatomy, George Washington University, Washington, DC, 1969.

    Publications

    No photo available

    Ernest F. Zimmerman, PhD

    Academic Information

    Emeritus, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4545

    Email: ernest.zimmerman@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Role of oxygen free radicals in teratogenesis; diabetic embryopathy and cocaine-induced birth defects.

    Biography

    Dr. Ernest Zimmerman's laboratory studies the role of oxygen free radicals produced by drugs or maternal factors to induce congenital malformations.

    Current research is exploring whether oxidative stress is a causative factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic embryopathy. Employing the Splotch mutation in a mouse model, experiments are testing whether diabetes-induced oxidative stress decreases activity of the Pax-3 protein via a redox control mechanism. Thus, the function of the endogenous Pax-3 protein would be additively inhibited by the heterozygous Splotch genotype and oxidative decrease of Pax-3 activity by diabetes.

    Publications