• Meet the Mulloy Lab

  • Susumu Goyama headshot.
    Susumu Goyama headshot.

    Susumu Goyama

    Research Fellow
    susumu.goyama@cchmc.org
    Susumu is interested in developing better disease models for myeloid malignancies, and is investigating functional collaboration between leukemia fusion proteins (MLL-AF9, AML1-ETO, CBFb-SMMHC) and mutated oncogenes (C-KIT, C-CBL, RUNX1, etc.) in human cord blood CD34+ cells.

    Susumu Goyama

    Shan Lin headshot.
    Shan Lin headshot.

    Shan Lin

    Graduate Student
    Shan.Lin@cchmc.org
    Shan works with Kevin Link to investigate the mechanism underlying the functional differences of various AE mutants in leukemia development, and plans to investigate the role of Dnmt1 in leukemogenesis.

    Shan Lin

    Benjamin Mizukawa headshot.
    Benjamin Mizukawa headshot.

    Benjamin Mizukawa

    Research Instructor
    Benjamin.mizukawa@cchmc.org
    Benjamin graduated from the University of Utah School of Medicine and came to Cincinnati Children’s for residency training in pediatrics and fellowship training in Hematology/Oncology.  He studies the role of the Rac family of small Rho GTPases in myeloid leukemogenesis. His work explores targeting Cdc42 to displace the leukemic stem cell from its protective microenvironment.

    Benjamin Mizukawa

    James Mulloy headshot.
    James Mulloy headshot.

    James Mulloy, PhD

    Professor
    james.mulloy@cchmc.org
    Jim’s interest is in the mechanism of transformation used by different leukemia fusion oncoproteins found in human AML, in particular the Core Binding Factor fusions and the MLL fusions. The genes targeted by these chromosomal translocations play critical roles in normal hematopoiesis and also in leukemogenesis. Together, these genetic aberrations account for 25-30% of all human AML cases. The Mulloy lab is developing relevant in vivo models of human leukemia using leukemia fusion gene expression in primary human blood stem cells. His lab has developed a “next generation” mouse that is superior for expanding human leukemia samples in vivo. They are using this model in chemotherapy studies to establish a system for testing experimental compounds for efficacy against human leukemia. Other work in the lab is focused on the molecular signals downstream of the leukemia fusion oncoproteins. These studies are aimed at gaining a better understanding of the mechanism of action of these leukemia oncogenes to assist in identifying novel molecules for therapeutic targeting.

    James Mulloy

    Christina Sexton headshot.
    Christina Sexton headshot.

    Christina Sexton

    Research Assistant II
    Christina.sexton@cchmc.org
    Christina is responsible for maintaining mouse colonies and assisting with experiments in the lab.

    Christina Sexton

    Mahesh Shrestha headshot.
    Mahesh Shrestha headshot.

    Mahesh Shrestha

    Research Assistant IV
    mahesh.shrestha@cchmc.org
    Mahesh is working on a collaborative investigation of the role of Decitabine, a cytosine analog, in shifting latency in a leukemia mouse model. Mahesh also assists Benjamin Mizukawa in his research projects in determining the roles of Rac and Cdc42 in leukemogenesis.

    Mahesh Shrestha

    Mark Wunderlich headshot.
    Mark Wunderlich headshot.

    Mark Wunderlich

    Senior Research Assistant
    mark.wunderlich@cchmc.org
    Mark is characterizing a new strain of NOD/SCID mouse, the NSGS mouse, as a tool for xenograft studies of human AML and normal hematopoiesis. The lab is currently using this xenograft AML model to study chemotherapeutic potential of novel small molecule inhibitors.

    Mark Wunderlich

  • Lab group photo.

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