Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology

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    Division Head

    A photo of Yi Zheng.

    Yi Zheng, PhD Director, Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology; Katherine Stewart Waters Endowed Chair

    studies the function and signaling mechanism of the Rho family GTPases and the mTor metabolic pathway, particularly in stem cell and cancer stem cell regulation.
    Visit the Zheng Lab.

    513-636-0595
    yi.zheng@cchmc.org

    Yi Zheng, PhD

    Director, Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology; Katherine Stewart Waters Endowed Chair

    Co-Director, Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-0595

    Fax: 513-636-3768

    Email: yi.zheng@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Research Interests

    Using transgenic and gene targeted mouse models to study the physiological and pathological roles of Rho GTPases and their regulators in hematopoiesis, neurogenesis, lung cancer development and small intestinal stem cell regulations; mechanism based, rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting Rho GTPase signaling modules and pathologic functions in cancer and blood diseases; mouse model studies of mTor signaling function in hematopoietic stem cells and small intestinal stem cells.

    Visit the Zheng Lab.

    Education and Training

    BS: Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, 1986.

    MS: Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 1988.

    PhD: Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 1991.

    Postdoctoral Fellow: Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 1995.

    Publications

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    Grants

    Rac GTPase specific small molecule inhibitors. PI: Yi Zheng. National Cancer Institute. NIH - R01 CA141341. 01/01/2000 - 01/31/2014

    Targeting Cdc42 in leukemia stem cells. PI: Yi Zheng, co-PI: James Mulloy. National Cancer Institute - 1R01CA150547-01. 04/01/2010 – 03/31/2015

    Cincinnati Center of Excellence in Molecular Hematology. PI: Yi Zheng. NIDDK - NIH P30 DK090971. 09/30/2010 – 06/30/2015

    Lineage Determination and Tissue Homeostasis in the aged Hematopoietic System. PI: Yi Zheng; co-PI: Hartmut Geiger. NIA - NIH R01AG040118. 08/01/2011 – 07/31/2016

    PHARMACOLOGICAL REJUVENATION OF AGED HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS. PI: Hartmut Geiger; co-PI: Yi Zheng. NIH - NIH R43 AG042986. 08/01/2012 – 07/31/2014

    Targeting Leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor LARG in AML. PI: Yi Zheng; co-PI: James Mulloy. Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation. 07/01/2013 – 06/30/2015

    Faculty

    A photo of Paul Andreassen.

    Paul R. Andreassen, PhD

    focuses on the relationship of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints to the genetic instability that underlies the development of cancer. In particular, he studies basic cellular mechanisms that respond to DNA damage, including breast cancer susceptibility (BRCA) and Fanconi anemia (FA) genes and proteins.
    Visit the Andreassen Lab.

    513-636-0499
    paul.andreassen@cchmc.org

    Paul R. Andreassen, PhD

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-0499

    Fax: 513-803-0783

    Email: paul.andreassen@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Fanconi Anemia; cell cycle check points; genetic instability; replication stress; relationship of DNA repair and chromatin; mitosis; cell biology

    Visit the Andreassen Lab.

    Education and Training

    BS: Willamette University, Salem, Oregon, 1984

    PhD: University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, 1995

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    FANCD2 monoubiquitination in DNA damage responses. Principal Investigator. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Jul 2008 - Jun 2014. #R01 HL085587.
    A photo of Mohammed Azam.

    Mohammad Azam, PhD

    is interested in understanding molecular basis of human cancers, especially hematopoietic malignancies. His research group focuses on understanding the mechanisms of tyrosine kinase regulation, oncogene addiction and the development of cancer stem cells.

    513-803-1413
    mohammad.azam@cchmc.org

    Mohammad Azam, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-1413

    Email: mohammad.azam@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Leukemia

    Research Interests

    Structure and function analysis of tyrosine kinases involved in the pathogenesis of leukemia; molecular basis of “oncogene addiction”;  modeling of human leukemia in mice using ES and patient derived iPS Cells

    Education and Training

    PhD: Jawaharlal Nehru University, India.

    Post-doc:
    Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research at MIT (2001-2003).

    Instructor:
    Children’s Hospital of Boston and Harvard Medical School. (2006-2009).

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Elisa Boscolo.

    Elisa Boscolo, PhD

    currently investigates vascular anomalies affecting children. She is devising a murine model of venous malformation. The goal of this research is to discover effective molecular therapies for this disfiguring vascular anomaly.

    513-803-7267
    elisa.boscolo@cchmc.org

    Elisa Boscolo, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-7267

    Email: elisa.boscolo@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Research

    Vascular anomalies; endothelial cell biology; mTOR signaling

    Biography

    Elisa Boscolo received her PhD from the University of Padua, Italy. She completed her postdoctoral training and worked as instructor in Joyce Bischoff ‘s laboratory where she investigated the cellular basis and the molecular signaling involved in infantile hemangioma formation. In May 2014, Dr. Boscolo moved to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center to study vascular anomalies.

    Education and Training

    BS: Molecular Biology, University of Padua, Padova, Italy.

    PhD: Tissue Engineering, University of Padua, Padova, Italy.

    Postdoctoral Fellowship: Vascular Biology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA.

    Publications

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    Grants

    Venous Malformation (VM): murine model to identify therapies to target aberrant venous development. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. 2013-2018.

    Role of NOTCH signaling during pathological blood vessel formation and maturation. Principal Investigator. Charles H. Hood Foundation. 2011-2014.

    A photo of Jose Cancelas Perez.

    Jose A. Cancelas Perez, MD, PhD Division Director of Research, Hoxworth Blood Center

    focuses on the study of blood-forming cells during the process of adult hematopoiesis. In particular, hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) attract clinical interest because of their potential use in stem cell and gene therapy, and because of their involvement in leukemia.
    Visit the Cancelas Lab.

    513-558-1324
    jose.cancelas@uc.edu

    Jose A. Cancelas Perez, MD, PhD

    Division Director of Research, Hoxworth Blood Center

    Deputy Director, Hoxworth Blood Center

    Director, Research Flow Cytometry Core

    Leader, Stem Cell Program

    Medical Director of Cellular Therapies, Hoxworth Blood Center

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-558-1324

    Fax: 513-558-1522

    Email: jose.cancelas@uc.edu

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    Specialties

    Hematopoietic stem cell proliferation and differentiation

    Visit the Cancelas Lab.

    Education and Training

    MD: Autonomous University of Madrid, Spain, 1989.

    Residency: Hematology and Hematotherapy, University of Alcala de Henares, Madrid, Spain, 1993.

    PhD: Faculty of Medicine, University of Alcala de Henares, Madrid, Spain, 1996.

    Publications

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    Grants

    Progenitor Cell Biology Consortium Administrative Coordinating Center, NHLBI/ Subaward through Univ. Maryland. Co-Director. (Cincinnati Cell Char Core). Sep 2010 – Aug 2016. #U01 HL099997. 

    Rational Design of a Vav/Rac Inhibitor as a New Therapy for High-Risk B-ALL. Principal Investigator. Leukemia & Lymphoma Society of North America. Oct 2012 – Sep 2015. 

    Cincinnati Excellence in Molecular Hematology: Cell Analysis and Sorting Core, NIH/NIDDK. Co-investigator. (Flow Cytometry Core Co-PI).  Sep 2010 – Jun 2015. #P30DK090971-01.

    A photo of Lionel Chow.

    Lionel M. L. Chow, MD, PhD St. Baldrick’s Foundation Scholar

    studies high-grade gliomas, which are aggressive brain tumors in adults and children with limited treatment options. Using a combination of novel and robust laboratory models coupled with the study of human tumor material, the lab’s goals are to better understand the cellular origins and molecular underpinnings of these diseases in order to design and test novel therapies that will hopefully improve patient outcome.
    Visit the Chow Lab

    513-803-1369
    lionel.chow@cchmc.org

    Lionel M. L. Chow, MD, PhD

    St. Baldrick’s Foundation Scholar

    Sontag Foundation Distinguished Scientist

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-1369

    Fax: 513-803-1083

    Email: lionel.chow@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Pediatric neuro-oncology

    Research Interests

    Mouse models for glioma; molecular profiling of tumor mutations; biomarkers of tumor progression; novel therapeutic agents for glioma

    Visit the Chow Lab

    Biography

    Lionel Chow, MD, PhD, received his medical and graduate degrees from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, where his research focused on the regulation of T-lymphocyte signaling by the intracellular tyrosine protein kinases Lck and Csk.

    Following his clinical training in pediatrics and pediatric hematology / oncology at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada, he moved to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., to pursue his research interests.

    Chow's research interests have been centered on glioblastoma multiforme, a particularly devastating form of cancer in adults and children. His work has resulted in the development of a number of novel and robust laboratory models for this disease. Using these models and interfacing with clinical trials in the Neuro-Oncology Program as well as those from national consortia such as the Children's Oncology Group (COG) and the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium (PBTC), Chow’s laboratory will continue research in this area with the goals of better understanding the origins of this form of cancer and improving patient outcomes.

    Education and Training

    PhD: McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 1996.

    MDCM: McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 1997.

    Residency: The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, 1997-2000.

    Clinical Fellowship: The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, 2000-2003.

    Postdoctoral Fellowship: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, 2003-2009.

    Clinical Fellowship: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis TN, 2008-2009.

    Certification: Pediatrics, 2000.

    Publications

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    Grants

    2013 – 2014 Sophie’s Angel Run Foundation
    “Preclinical Testing of Notch and mTor Inhibition in a Mouse Model for High-Grade Glioma” 

    2011 – 2014 St. Baldrick’s Foundation Scholars Award
    "Molecular targeting of pediatric high-grade glioma"

    2011 – 2015 Sontag Foundation Distinguished Scientist Award
    "Molecular targeting of high-grade astrocytoma"

    A photo of Dr. Biplab Dasgupta.

    Biplab Dasgupta, PhD, MS

    focuses on the integration of metabolic and signaling pathways in neural cells including neural and brain cancer stem cells. He is particularly interested in understanding the link between cellular energy sensing pathways with cellular signaling circuits that are controlled by growth factors and their receptors. Mouse models are used to understand the development of high grade human and mouse brain tumor (glioma).
    Visit the Dasgupta Lab.

    513-803-1370
    biplab.dasgupta@cchmc.org

    Biplab Dasgupta, PhD, MS

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-1370

    Fax: 513-803-1083

    Email: biplab.dasgupta@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Biography

    Biplab Dasgupta, PhD, MS, completed his doctorate in molecular biology and immunology at the Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Calcutta, and a postdoctoral fellowship at Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis. Dr. Dasgupta came to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center in August 2009 as an assistant professor of pediatrics. He is interested in understanding how neural cell / stem cell metabolic and energy status is linked to cell cycle, lineage commitment, differentiation and tumorigenesis. His other interests include genetic, developmental, post-translational, tissue- and stimuli–specific regulation of the subunits that constitute the AMP kinase complex.

    Education and Training

    PhD: Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Calcutta, 2003

    Postdoctoral Fellowship:
    Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Regulation of Forebrain Neurogenesis by the Energy Sensor AMP Kinase. Principal Investigator. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). July 2012 – June 2017.
    A photo of Jay Degen.

    Jay L. Degen, PhD

    studies the mechanisms by which circulating and cell-associated hemostatic factors contribute to development, tissue reorganization, inflammatory processes and disease. He also focuses on defining the regulatory pathways by which thrombin and thrombin targets contribute to cancer biology, inflammatory joint disease, neuroinflammatory disease, bacterial virulence/host defense, and immunological disorders.  

    513-636-4679
    jay.degen@cchmc.org

    Jay L. Degen, PhD

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4679

    Email: jay.degen@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Molecular genetics of plasminogen activation in development, hemostasis, and tumor progression; molecular genetics and biological role of plasminogen activation in development, hemostasis, wound repair, and disease

    Biography

    Jay L. Degen, PhD, is studying the regulation and biological roles of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), the two mammalian enzymes that convert plasminogen to the active serine protease, plasmin.

    The PA/plasmin system of proteases is of particular interest because of its apparent dual function in the lysis of vascular fibrin clots (fibrinolysis) and the degradation of extracellular matrix in tissue remodeling and cell migration events. 

    Over the last few years, Dr. Degen's lab has generated and characterized gene-targeted mouse lines with deficits in the factors that are the foundation of the coagulation and fibrinolytic cascades, including fibrinogen-, plasminogen-, plasminogen activator-, and plasminogen activator receptor-deficient mouse lines.

    These unique experimental animals are being intensively analyzed with regard to a wide range of phenotypic properties, including hemostasis, wound healing, angiogenesis and tumor biology.

    Education and Training

    PhD: University of Washington, 1983. 

    Publications

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    Grants

    Thrombin-mediated proteolysis in neuroinflammatory disease. Principal Investigator. National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Jul 2009  – Jun 2014. #R01 HL096126.
    A photo of Marie-Dominique Filippi.

    Marie-Dominique Filippi, PhD

    is interested in dissecting the molecular mechanism of hematopoietic cell migration. Because hematopoietic cells are utilized for the therapy of multiple blood diseases and neutrophils are responsible for maintaining an immunocompetence status, understanding the molecular mechanism of normal hematopoietic cell functions is of potential therapeutic importance.
    Visit the Filippi Lab.

    513-636-0991
    Marie-Dominique.Filippi@cchmc.org

    Marie-Dominique Filippi, PhD

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-0991

    Fax: 513-636-3768

    Email: Marie-Dominique.Filippi@cchmc.org

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    Biography

    Dr. Filippi is particularly interested in dissecting the molecular mechanism of hematopoietic cell migration, including neutrophils and hematopoietic stem cells in physiological settings. Migration is a critical function of hematopoietic cell in which actin cytoskeleton reorganization plays a central role. Because hematopoietic cells are utilized for the therapy of multiple blood diseases and neutrophils are responsible for maintaining an immunocompetence status, understanding the molecular mechanism of normal hematopoietic cell functions is of potential therapeutic importance. The small RHO GTPase family, members of the Ras superfamily, including Rac, RHO and CDC42, play key roles in regulating many of these functions. During her post-doc in the laboratory of Dr. David Williams, they have demonstrated that two highly related proteins, Rac1 and Rac2, of the small Rho GTPase family, have distinct functions in the control of hematopoietic cell functions. In particular in neutrophils, they have shown that both Rac1 and Rac2 regulate cell migration but with distinct mechanism (Gu and Filippi et al, Science 2003) both in vitro and in vivo. In addition to this work, they have dissected the sequence/determinant specificity of Rac2 versus Rac1 functions in neutrophils and demonstrated that Rac2 controls its functions, at least in part, by distinct subcellular distributions of these GTPases (Tao et al, Blood 2002, Filippi et al, Nat Immunol 2004), highlighting one important mechanism controlling cellular functions. 

    Dr. Filippi's laboratory, in collaboration Dr. Yi Zheng, is now focused on determining the role of CDC42 and RhoA in neutrophil migration and in determining specifically the role of RhoA in hematopoietic stem cell migration and proliferation using gene targeted knock out mice for CDC42 and RhoA and their respective regulator CDC42GAP and 190RhoGAP. These studies will use in vitro and in vivo assays of cell migration as well as immunofluorescence microscopy to study cytoskeleton rearrangement associated with cell migration. 

    The long term goal of these studies is to identify new molecular targets of potential therapeutic importance.

    Visit the Filippi Lab.

    Education and Training

    PharmD: University of Rene Descartes, Paris, France, 1998.

    Residency: Hematopathology, University of Rene Descartes, Assistance public Hospital of Paris, Paris, France.

    Certification: Hematopathology, 2001.

    PhD: University of Denis Diderot, Paris, France, 2001.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Regulation of Neutrophil Migration and Polarity. National Institutes of Health. Mar 2010 - Mar 2015. #R01 HL 090676.
    A photo of Matthew J. Flick.

    Matthew J. Flick, PhD

    is working to understand how hemostatic factors in the blood that are responsible for clotting also drive inflammation in the context of infection and diseases such as arthritis and fatty liver disease.

    513-636-6628
    matthew.flick@cchmc.org

    Matthew J. Flick, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-6628

    Email: matthew.flick@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Hemostatic factors and arthritis pathogenesis

    Biography

    Research Interests and Focus:

    1. Activation of the coagulation system, including the central coagulation protease thrombin, is a prominent feature of both human rheumatoid arthritis and experimental inflammatory arthritis. The long-term goal of Dr. Flick's research program is to determine how thrombin drives inflammatory joint disease. The proposed work will fill significant gaps in the understanding of the interplay between the thrombin- fibrinogen axis and arthritic disease, and may provide the proof-of-principle for the use of novel "customized" thrombin mutants with selected substrate specificity to treat arthritis.

    2. The pervasive gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus is a common pathogen that is the causative agent for a wide spectrum of diseases including skin infections, pneumonia, bacteremia, toxic-shock syndrome and sepsis. Notably, this pathogen has evolved and maintained a number of proteins that directly engage the host hemostatic system, including factors that directly interact with the host coagulation factor fibrinogen. The long-term goal of his research program is to understand how bacterial derived proteins interact with host factors to promote bacterial virulence in the context of blood-born infections. This work will provide novel insight into the molecular pathways by which S. aureus invades and disseminates within host tissues and may shed light into novel strategies for eliminating this potentially devastating infectious agent.

    3. Obesity is a worldwide epidemic linked to numerous disease sequelae, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This spectrum disorder can progress from the simple accumulation of triglycerides within hepatocytes (i.e., steatosis), to inflammatory steatohepatitis, to organ failure secondary to irreversible liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Dysregulation of the coagulation system has been documented in both patients with fatty liver disease and animal models of NAFLD, but any contribution to disease progression has remained largely undefined. Using a murine model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD, they are testing the hypothesis that thrombin activity and fibrin deposition drive local inflammatory events promoting the progression of steatosis and steatohepatitis. Comparative studies of wild-type mice with genetically imposed deficiencies or functional alterations in prothrombin, fibrinogen and other associated coagulation factor components suggests that the thrombin-fibrinogen axis influences NAFLD pathogenesis by controlling local inflammatory processes that drive steatosis and by an unanticipated and unknown mechanism tying fibrin(ogen) to HFD-induced weight gain/obesity. Their research has far-reaching implications not only for the treatment and prevention of fatty liver disease, but also for all the downstream sequelae of obesity and even the development of diet-mediated weight gain itself.

    Education and Training

    BS: Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH.

    PhD: Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.

    Post-doctoral Fellow: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and Medical Center, Division of Developmental Biology, Cincinnati, OH.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Mechanisms linking the hemostatic protease thrombin to arthritic disease. Principal Investigator. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. Jul 2009-Jun 2014. #R01 AR056990.

    Thrombin-mediated proteolysis in neuroinflammatory disease. Co-investigator. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Jul 2009-Jun 2014. #R01 HL096126.

    NIH, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Research. Director. Cincinnati Rheumatic Diseases Core Center. Aug 2011-Jun 2016. 2P30 AR47363. 

    Hemostatic factors and sickle cell disease. Co-investigator. NIH. Dec 2011-Nov 2016. R01 HLI12603.

    Analysis of Staphylococcus Host Interactions. Co-investigator. NIH. Sep 2010-Aug 2015. R01 AI020662.

    A photo of Hartmut Geiger.

    Hartmut Geiger, PhD Director, Mouse Core

    focuses on hematopoietic stem cells and their process of hematopoiesis. Blood cells are responsible for constant oxygen supply, broad and specialized immune protection, wound healing, and much more of which we might not be aware.
    Visit the Geiger Lab.

    513-636-1338
    hartmut.geiger@cchmc.org

    Hartmut Geiger, PhD

    Director, Mouse Core

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-1338

    Fax: 513-636-3768

    Email: hartmut.geiger@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Hematopoietic stem cells; genetics; aging/longevity; plasticity of stem cells; mobilization; DNA-repair.

    Education and Training

    MS: Studies in chemistry at the University Karlsruhe, Germany and studies in biochemistry at the University Witten/Herdecke, Germany (1996).

    PhD: Max-Planck Institut für Immunbiologie in Freiburg, Germany.
    Plasticity of murine hematopoietic stem cells (1999).

    Postdoctoral Studies: University of Kentucky, Lexington, USA.
    Genetic analysis of hematopoiesis and aging/longevity in mice.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Elke Grassman.

    Elke Grassman, PhD Director, Translational Trials Development and Support Laboratory

    focuses on phase I gene transfer/cell therapy trials, investigational new drug (IND) submissions to the FDA, the evaluation of new vectors with respect to safety and efficacy, development of tailored assays for trial monitoring, and a stat Endotoxin testing service to support cell therapy trials.

    513-636-0958
    elke.grassman@cchmc.org

    Elke Grassman, PhD

    Director, Translational Trials Development and Support Laboratory

    Academic Information

    N/A

    Field Service Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-0958

    Fax: 513-636-1446

    Email: elke.grassman@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Diagnostic assay for the identification of complementation groups on specimens from patients diagnosed with Fanconi Anemia

    Research Interests

    Phase I gene transfer / cell therapy trials; investigational new drug (IND) submissions to the FDA; evaluate new vectors with respect to safety and efficacy; develop tailored assays for trial monitoring; stat Endotoxin testing service to support cell therapy trials

    Education and Training

    MS: University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany, 1995.

    PhD: University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany, 1999.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Lee Grimes.

    H. Leighton (Lee) Grimes, PhD Director, Cancer Pathology Program of the Division of Experimental Hematology and the Division of Pathology

    focuses his research on the genetic development of cancerous cells and inherited blood diseases. His lab utilizes the Growth factor independent-1 transcription factor as a molecular probe to dissect hematopoiesis and leukemia. Dr. Grimes serves as the director of the Cancer Pathology Program of the Divisions of Experimental Hematology and Pathology.
    Visit the Grimes Lab.

    513-636-6089
    lee.grimes@cchmc.org

    H. Leighton (Lee) Grimes, PhD

    Director, Cancer Pathology Program of the Division of Experimental Hematology and the Division of Pathology

    Co-Leader, Program in Hematologic Malignancies of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-6089

    Fax: 513-636-5355

    Email: lee.grimes@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Transcriptional control of hematopoiesis and cancer.

    Visit the Grimes Lab.

    Biography

    Grimes Laboratory:

    The cloning and characterization of oncoproteins and tumor suppressors over the last 25 years has not only resulted in a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms of transformation, but it has also provided a large set of therapeutic targets. Our lab is interested in the progression of a cell with a single genetic lesion to an invasive cancer with multiple genetic alterations. We focus on the Growth factor independence-1 (Gfi1) transcription factor, which is poorly oncogenic alone, but which potently collaborates with well known oncoproteins such as c-MYC. Gfi1 is the most frequently targeted gene in Moloney murine leukemia virus-induced tumors and induces tumor progression to cytokine-independent growth. In contrast, loss of Gfi1 in hematopoietic stem cells induces cell cycle progression and eventual bone marrow failure; implicating Gfi1 as a tumor suppressor in such cells. Gfi1 null mice have no mature neutrophils, and we have identified humans with Severe Congenital Neutropenia (SCN) and Non-Immune Chronic Idiopathic Neutropenia of Adults (NI-CINA) bearing mutations in Gfi1. Interestingly, such patients are at increased risk for the development of myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia. We have recently generated the first mouse model of Severe Congenital Neutropenia through the expression of mutant Gfi1 proteins in primary murine hematopoietic cells. Moreover, we are utilizing mouse models of human cancer to assess the risk of Gfi1 mutant humans for the development of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Education and Training

    PhD: Immunology and Molecular Pathology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

    Postdoctoral Fellow: Fox Chase Cancer Center.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Fukun Guo.

    Fukun Guo, PhD

    studies Rho GTPases and T and B lymphocyte development and function.

    513-803-1118
    fukun.guo@cchmc.org

    Fukun Guo, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-1118

    Email: fukun.guo@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Rho GTPases and T and B lymphocyte development and function

    Education and Training

    BS: Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin, China,1994.

    MS: Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing, China, 1997.

    PhD: Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China, 2000.

    Postdoctoral Research Associate: University of Tennessee, Memphis, TN, 2000-2002; Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, 2002-2004.

    Research Associate: Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China, 2000. Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, 2004.

    Research Instructor: Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH. 2005-2009

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Gang Huang.

    Gang Huang, PhD

    focuses on genetic and epigenetic regulations of normal blood cell development and leukemia. His team demonstrated that AML1/CBFβ and Mixed-Lineage Leukemia (MLL) protein form a regulatory complex, which is important for normal blood development and acts as a tumor suppressor in leukemia.

    513-636-3214
    gang.huang@cchmc.org

    Gang Huang, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-3214

    Fax: 513-636-3768

    Email: gang.huang@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Research in Dr. Huang’s laboratory focuses on genetic and epigenetic regulations of blood cell normal development and leukemia. We first demonstrated that AML1/CBFβ (a hetero-dimer transcription factor) and Mixed-Lineage Leukemia (MLL) protein (an enzyme which methylates lysine 4 of histone H3 tails), form a regulatory complex, which is important for normal blood development and acts as a tumor suppressor in leukemia. Mutations in either one of these three genes account for majority of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS).

    We also found that the AML1/CBFβ/MLL complex regulates another transcription factor, PU.1, through the upstream regulatory region of the PU.1 gene and that the epigenetic changes of the histone tails occurring in the PU.1 regulatory region correlate with the PU.1 expression level. PU.1 expression level changes are critical for blood cell differentiation and dysregulation of PU.1 dosages leading to leukemia.

    This research will provide new insight into the interplay between genetics and epigenetics in normal blood development and leukemia. It will also help to develop generic drugs for most of the AML, ALL and MDS, which will benefit the future clinical treatments.

    Education and Training

    BS: Peking University, College of Science, Beijing, P.R. China, 1991.

    MS: Inner Mongolia University, Graduate School of Science, Huhhort, P.R. China, 1994.

    PhD: Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan, 2001.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Theodosia A. Kalfa.

    Theodosia A. Kalfa, MD, PhD

    focuses on the study of intracellular signals in erythropoiesis and mature red blood cells, specifically the signals conducted by Rho GTPases regulating terminal erythroid maturation and enucleation. Her lab also studies the role of Rac GTPases in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within red blood cells from patients and animal models with sickle-cell disease along with the signaling mechanisms and consequences of increased ROS in sickle cells.
    Visit the Kalfa Lab.

    513-636-0989
    theodosia.kalfa@cchmc.org

    Theodosia A. Kalfa, MD, PhD

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-0989

    Fax: 513-636-3549

    Email: theodosia.kalfa@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Signaling in erythrocytes; erythropoiesis; sickle cell disease; reactive oxygen species

    Visit the Kalfa Lab.

    Education and Training

    MD: Aristotle University Medical School, Thessaloniki, Greece, 1990.

    PhD: Aristotle University Medical School, Thessaloniki, Greece, 1997.

    Residency: University Of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 1999.

    Fellowship: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 2003.

    Certification: Hematology / oncology, American Board of Pediatrics, 2004; Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics, 2000; ECFMG Certification, 1995.

    Licenses: Full and unrestricted medical license (OH Medical Board), 2003-present; full and unrestricted license of medical practice in Greece, 1990-present.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Rho GTPases in Terminal Erythroid Maturation. Principal Investigator. NIH/NHLBI. Sep 2012-Jun 2016. #1R01HL116352.

    Erythrocyte Cytoskeleton Disorders Diagnostic Core. Principal Investigator. CCTST PCS T1 Pilot. July 2013- June 2015.

    Cincinnati Center of Excellence in Hemoglobinopathies Research. Co-investigator. NIH/NHLBI. Aug 2013–May 2018. # U01 HL117709.

    TCD with Transfusions Changing to Hydroxyurea. Co-investigator. NIH/Baylor. Aug 2009-Jul 2014. #R01HL095647.

    A photo of Kakajan Komurov.

    Kakajan Komurov, PhD

    focuses on computational systems biology. His specific research interests include: 1) the development of novel computational methodology and software for efficient network-based data analyses and 2) computational analyses of dynamic organizational principles in intracellular molecular networks and their specific alterations that contribute to disease phenotypes.
    Visit the Komurov Lab.

    513-803-5122
    kakajan.komurov@cchmc.org

    Kakajan Komurov, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-5122

    Email: kakajan.komurov@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Education and Training

    PhD: The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.

    Publications

    A photo of Ashish Kumar.

    Ashish R. Kumar, MD, PhD

    is a pediatric hematologist-oncologist who has a research program investigating the biology of leukemia caused by MLL-fusion genes. These leukemias are most common in infants and frequently fatal. The research in Dr. Kumar's lab is focused at identifying downstream targets of MLL-fusion proteins that could be exploited to develop novel therapies. Currently, the Kumar lab is investigating the role of MEIS1 in MLL-leukemia.
    Visit the Kumar Lab.

    513-803-1631
    ashish.kumar@cchmc.org

    Ashish R. Kumar, MD, PhD

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-1631

    Fax: 513-636-3549

    Email: ashish.kumar@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Childhood cancer and blood disorders; immune deficiency

    Research Interests

    Leukemia biology; cancer biology

    Visit the Kumar Lab.

    Biography

    Dr. Kumar received his medical degree from L.T.M. Medical College, Mumbai, India, his PhD in anatomy and cell biology from the University of Iowa, pediatric residency training at the Mayo Clinic and fellowship in pediatric hematology / oncology / BMT at the University of Minnesota. He was appointed to the faculty of the University of Minnesota in the Department of Pediatrics where he was a member of the programs in pediatric leukemia and global pediatrics. As a faculty of the Masonic Cancer Center, he was also part of the Genetic Mechanisms of Cancer research program. Dr. Kumar’s laboratory is engaged in researching the biology of infant leukemia. Discoveries made in his laboratory have significantly enhanced the current understanding of leukemia.

    Education and Training

    MD: LTM Medical College, Mumbai, India.

    Residency: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

    Fellowship: University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.

    PhD: University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA.

    Certification: General Pediatrics; Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Subspecialty.

    Licenses: State of Ohio; State of Minnesota.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Adam Lane.

    Adam Lane, PhD

    has methodological research interests in designs for phase I/II clinical trials, survival analysis and structural equation modeling. Dr. Lane is also a dedicated collaborator with both clinical and basic science researchers in bone marrow transplantation, hematology, oncology and cancer biology.

    513-803-1828
    adam.lane@cchmc.org

    Adam Lane, PhD

    Academic Information

    Instructor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-1828

    Email: adam.lane@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Research

    Clinical trials; survival analysis; structural equation modeling

    Biography

    Dr. Lane joined Cincinnati Children's in July 2013. He has published novel statistical methods in the areas of adaptive and optimal experimental designs with applications to phase I and phase II clinical trials. As a graduate student he received funding from the NIH to spend the fall semester of 2011 at the University of Cambridge in the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences. He has also received NSF travel awards to present his research at national and international conferences.

    Education and Training

    PhD: University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, 2013.

    Publications

    A photo of Qing Richard Lu.

    Qing Richard Lu, PhD Scientific Director, Brain Tumor Center

    and his lab study the transcriptional and signaling regulatory networks that control gliogenesis (oligodendrocyte, astrocyte and Schwann cell), brain cancer stem/initiating cell growth and myelinogenesis. Dr. Lu lab utilizes transgenic and gene targeting mouse models to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying demyelinating diseases and brain tumorigenesis and to develop new therapies for neurodegenerative diseases and brain cancers.

    Visit the Lu Lab.

    513-636-7684
    richard.lu@cchmc.org

    Qing Richard Lu, PhD

    Scientific Director, Brain Tumor Center

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-7684

    Email: richard.lu@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Education and Training

    BS: Peking Normal University, Beijing, China, 1988.

    MS: Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ, 1993.

    PhD: Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ, 1997.

    Postdoctoral Fellow: Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA, 1997 - 2002.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    A Novel Model of Medulloblastoma to Define Cancer Pathways and Molecular Targets. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health (NINDS). April 2012 – March 2017. 1R01NS078092.

    Molecular Mechanisms of Oligodendrocyte Differentiation and Myelination. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health (NINDS). Sept 2010 – Aug 2015. 1R01NS072427.

    Chromatin Remodeling Control of CNS Myelination and Remyelination. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health (NINDS). April 2012 – March 2017. 1R01NS075243-01.

    MicroRNA control of Myelination and Remyelination in the Central Nervous System. Principal Investigator. National Multiple Sclerosis Society. July 2012 – June 2015. RG-4727-A-6-0-1.

    Remodeling Factors in Oligodendrocyte Myelination and Remyelination. Principal Investigator. National Multiple Sclerosis Society. April 2011 – March 2014. RG-4568-A-5.

    Identification of Novel Small Molecules for CNS Myelin Repair. Co-principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. July 2012 – June 2014. 1R21NS077215-01A1.

    A photo of Carolyn Lutzko.

    Carolyn M. Lutzko, PhD

    studies the regulation of human pluripotent stem cells, somatic cell reprogramming in iPSC, human embryonic stem cell physiology and differentiation, hESC, and cystic fibrosis.

    513-803-3420
    carolyn.lutzko@cchmc.org

    Carolyn M. Lutzko, PhD

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-3420

    Fax: 513-636-1146

    Email: carolyn.lutzko@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Regulating human pluripotent stem cell; somatic cell reprogramming in iPSC; human embryonic stem cell physiology and differentiation; hESC; Cystic Fibrosis

    Education and Training

    BA: University of Guelph, S.Sc. Hon, Molecular Biology and Genetics Guelph, Ontario, Canada 1992.

    PhD: University of Toronto, PhD Department of Laboratory Medicine Toronto, Ontario, Canada 1999.

    Fellowship: Childrens Hospital Los Angeles Department of Pediatrics Division of Research Immunology/BMT Los Angeles, California 1999-2002.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Human Embryonic Stem Cell Facility. California Institute of Regenerative Medicine.  Dec 2007-Nov 2012. CL1-00507-1.

    Training Grant II. Co-Investigator. California Institute of Regenerative Medicine. Aug 2009-Jul 2012.
    A photo of Punam Malik, MD.

    Punam Malik, MD Marjory J. Johnson Chair of Gene and Cell Therapy

    works to correct the gene responsible for sickle cell anemia. One of our lab’s major projects uses gene therapy to treat sickle cell disease. His lab is also interested in gene therapy for other diseases. He has developed various methods for delivering corrective genes to cells, improving methods for gene therapy in general.

    513-636-1333
    punam.malik@cchmc.org

    Punam Malik, MD

    Marjory J. Johnson Chair of Gene and Cell Therapy

    Director, Comprehensive Sickle Cell Program

    Director, Translational Trials Development and Support Laboratory

    Program Leader, Hematology and Gene Therapy Program

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-1333

    Fax: 513-636-1330

    Email: punam.malik@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Education and Training

    MBBS: University of Delhi, New Delhi, India, 1985.

    MD: University of Delhi, New Delhi, India, 1989.

    MS: University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, 1991.

    Fellowship: Children's Hospital Los Angeles, University of Southern California, 1995.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Ruhikanta Meetei, PhD.

    Ruhikanta A. Meetei, PhD

    focuses on functional analysis of Fanconi anemia gene products. The major research focus includes identification of new FA genes and signal transduction pathways that regulate DNA-damage-induced activation of the FA-core complex.

    513-636-1768
    ruhikanta.meetei@cchmc.org

    Ruhikanta A. Meetei, PhD

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-1768

    Fax: 513-636-3768

    Email: ruhikanta.meetei@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Fanconi anemia; chromosome instability; DNA repair; multiprotein complex

    Research Interests

    Research in my laboratory focuses on functional analysis of Fanconi anemia gene products. The major research focus includes identification of new FA genes and signal transduction pathways that regulate DNA damage induced activation of the FA-core complex. Important technologies include biochemical purification of multiprotein complexes from human cell extracts, immunoprecipitation, RNAi, and biochemical assays. My long-term research goal is to use Fanconi anemia as a model system to study some of the important fundamental questions of cancer biology in general.

    Education and Training

    BS: Manipur University, India, 1989.

    MS: Manipur University, India, 1992.

    PhD: Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India, 2000.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Function and Regulation of FANCM in Fanconi Anemia. National Institutes of Health. May 2007 - Apr 2012. #R01 HL 084082. 

    Functional and Molecular Characterization of Two New Members of the Bloom Syndrome Complex Ohio Cancer Research Associates. Jul 2010 - Jun 2012.
    A photo of Benjamin Mizukawa, MD.

    Benjamin E. Mizukawa, MD

    is trained in pediatric hematology/oncology with a research emphasis in leukemia biology and novel therapeutics. His work is focused on understanding the role of small Rho GTPases in myeloid leukemia development and progression, with the translational goal of identifying new targets for drug development.

    513-636-1335
    benjamin.mizukawa@cchmc.org

    Benjamin E. Mizukawa, MD

    Academic Information

    Instructor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-1335

    Email: benjamin.mizukawa@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Pediatric leukemia and lymphoma; investigation of the role of small Rho GTPases in leukemogenesis and leukemic stem cell biology and their potential as therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia; development of xenograft models for use in testing novel therapeutics

    Education and Training

    MD: University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 2004.

    Residency: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH.

    Fellowship: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH.

    Certification: Pediatrics, 2008
    Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, 2011

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Characterization of Rho GTPases in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and their potential as therapeutic targets. Principal Investigator. Pediatric Scientist Development Program (PSDP) Fellowship. 2008 - 2011.

    Targeting Leukemia Cell Interaction with the Marrow Niche. Sub-Investigator. Child Health Research Career Development Award (CHRCDA) NIH K12. 2011 - 2012.

    Targeting Cdc42 in Leukemia Stem Cells. Principal Investigator. Procter Scholar Award. Cincinnati Children's Hospital Research Foundation. 2012 - 2013.

    A photo of James Mulloy.

    James C. Mulloy, PhD

    focuses on using human hematopoietic stem cells to model leukemia. His lab is expressing the fusion protein, AML1-ETO, in human CD34+ stem cells by retroviral transduction and characterizing the genetic and functional alterations that occur due to expression of this oncogene.
    Visit the Mulloy Lab.

    513-636-1844
    james.mulloy@cchmc.org

    James C. Mulloy, PhD

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-1844

    Fax: 513-636-3768

    Email: james.mulloy@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Education and Training

    BA: St. Anselm College, Manchester, New Hampshire, 1986.

    MS: Rutgers University-University of Medicine and Dentistry, New Brunswick, New Jersey, 1989.

    PhD: Rutgers University-University of Medicine and Dentistry, New Brunswick, New Jersey, 1992.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Pediatric Biphenotypic Leukemia. Co-Principal Investigator. Cincinnati Children’s – Sheba Medical Center (Israeli/Mulloy). Nov 2013-Oct 2014.

    Conferring in vivo metabolic resistance to a highly selective anti-AML agent. Co-Investigator. National Institutes of Health R21 NCI (Merino/Mulloy). Apr 2014-Mar 2016.

    Origin and progression of Myelosdysplastic syndrome in patients with Bone Marrow Failure Disorders. Co-Investigator. Center for Clinical and Translational Science and Training (Mehta/Mulloy/Cancelas). Jul 2014-Jun 2015.

    Therapeutic Targeting of LARG-RhoA signaling in childhood leukemia. Co-Principal Investigator. Alex's Lemonade Stand (Zheng/Mulloy). July 2013-June 2015.

    SGN-CD33A anti-tumor activity against relapse AML. Seattle Genetics.  June 2013-May 2014.

    Targeting Cdc42 in leukemia stem cells. Co-Principal Investigator. National Cancer Institute. Apr 2010-Mar 2015. #1R01CA150547-01. 

    Rac Signaling in MLL Leukemia. Principal Investigator. Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Jul 2010-Jun 2015.

    Cincinnati Center of Excellence in Molecular Hematology. Co-Director, Animal Core. National Institutes of Health. Sep 2010 – Jul 2015. # P30 DK090971.

    Genotype and phenotype of chemoresistant AML. Principal Investigator. NIH, NCI. Mar 13-Feb 15. R21 CA168369

    Hemostatic system components as novel therapeutic targets in childhood AML. Co-Principal Investigator. Center for Clinical and Translational Science and Training (Palumbo/Mulloy). Jul 13-Jun 14.

    A Novel ROS-activated Therapeutic Modality for AML. Co-Principal Investigator. Center for Clinical and Translational Science and Training (Merino/Mulloy). Jul 13-Jun 14.

    Validation and structural requirements of a novel anti-leukemia agent. Co-Principal Investigator. UC Technology Commercialization Accelerator (Merino/Mulloy). University of Cincinnati. Apr 13-Mar 14  

    Efficacy and selectivity in combination of novel ROS activated anticancer agent. Co-Principal Investigator. University Research Council-UC (Merino/Mulloy). Interdisciplinary Faculty Research Support Grant. Apr 13-Mar 14

    Human IFN- Neutralization in Humanized NSGS Mice Developing Cytopenias. Principal Investigator. NovImmune (Mulloy/Jordan). Mar 13-Feb 14.

    LSC mobilization and differentiation therapy. Co-Principal Investigator. Hyundai Hope On Wheels! (Mulloy/Mizukawa). Sep 13-Aug 15.

    A photo of Nicolas Nassar.

    Nicolas Nassar, PhD

    is a structural biologist interested in understanding the structure/function of signaling proteins, how they specifically bind and recognize regulators and targets, and in finding ways to inhibit their signaling in disease. His lab combines X-ray crystallography, site-directed mutagenesis, enzyme kinetics, and other biophysical techniques in its studies.

    513-636-6597
    nicolas.nassar@cchmc.org

    Nicolas Nassar, PhD

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-6597

    Email: nicolas.nassar@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Biography

    Nicolas Nassar, PhD is a structural biologist interested in the structure/function of signaling proteins and in finding ways to inhibit their signaling in disease. More specifically, we are interested in how a given protein specifically binds and recognizes its regulators and targets. We have over the years focused on Ras-like GTPases. Recently, however we have been interested in a new family of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). We combine X-ray crystallography, site-directed mutagenesis, enzyme kinetics, and other biophysical techniques in our studies.

    Education and Training

    PhD: University Joseph Fourier, Grenoble – France (1992).

    Postdoc: Max Plank Institut, Dortmund – Germany (1996).

    Research Associate: Cornell University, Ithaca – NY (2000). 

    Assistant Professor: Stony Brook University, NY (2006). 

    Research Assistant Professor: Stony Brook University (2010).

    Publications

    A photo of Dao Pan, PhD.

    Dao Pan, PhD

    has long term research interests in combining translational and basic research on virus-mediated gene transfer and disease treatment for Mucopolysaccharidoses disorders, which are often associated with systemic and central nerve system abnormalities, and early childhood death.
    Visit the Pan Lab.

    513-636-6315
    Dao.Pan@cchmc.org

    Dao Pan, PhD

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-6315

    Fax: 513-636-1330

    Email: Dao.Pan@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Hematopoietic stem cells; Mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells; Gene therapy; Human genetics; Translational research; Lysosomal storage diseases

    Visit the Pan Lab.

    Education and Training

    PhD: University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 1997.

    MS: Peking Normal University, Beijing, China, 1991.

    BS: Peking Normal University, Beijing, China, 1988.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Comprehensive Sickle Cell Center. Co-investigator. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Apr 2008 - Mar 2013. #U54 HL070871.

    Genetic Therapy for CNS Manifestations in MPS I via BBB-Targeted Protein Delivery. Principal Investigator. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Sep 2008 - Aug 2013. #R01 NS064330.

    Gaucher Disease: Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disease. Principal Investigator. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Sep 2013 - May 2018. #R01 NS086134.

    A photo of Quishen Pang.

    Qishen Pang, PhD

    The Pang laboratory is focused on elucidating the mechanisms by which the Fanconi proteins regulate hematopoietic stem cells in the context of bone marrow failure and leukemia development. The goal of the research is to identify novel pharmaceutical targets for the treatment of patients with Fanconi anemia and other bone marrow failure syndromes. Several current projects will utilize cellular, genetic, and molecular techniques to identify and characterize critical pathways that regulate hematopoietic stem cells function, using knockout mice and xenotransplant models.
    Visit the Pang Lab

    513-636-1152
    qishen.pang@cchmc.org

    Qishen Pang, PhD

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-1152

    Fax: 513-636-3768

    Email: qishen.pang@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Signal transduction in Fanconi anemia and its evolution to leukemia.

    Visit the Pang Lab.

    Education and Training

    PhD: Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, 1993.

    Postdoctoral Fellow: Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR, 2000.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Role of tumor necrosis factor in leukemogenesis. Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. July 2008 - Jun 2013.

    Role of FA proteins in hematopoiesis. National Institutes of Health. May 2005 - Apr 2015. 

    Targeted improvement in stem cell therapy for leukemia and bone marrow failure syndromes. National Institutes of Health. Feb 2011 - Jan 2016.

    A photo of Nancy Ratner.

    Nancy Ratner, PhD Beatrice C. Lampkin Chair, Cancer Biology

    is working to define the interactions between glial cells and axons during nervous system development and how those interactions go awry in disease. Her goal is to develop novel therapies for patients with nervous system diseases.

    Visit the Ratner Lab.

    513-636-9469
    nancy.ratner@cchmc.org

    Nancy Ratner, PhD

    Beatrice C. Lampkin Chair, Cancer Biology

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-9469

    Fax: 513-636-3549

    Email: nancy.ratner@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Development of the nervous system; peripheral nerve tumor formation

    Research Interests

    Genetic mutations in tumor suppressor genes

    Visit the Ratner Lab.

    Biography

    Nancy Ratner, PhD, is interested in understanding mechanisms of peripheral nerve tumor (neurofibroma) formation in Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a common inherited disorder in which children are predisposed to cancer of the nervous system, to learning problems, bone disorders, and other cancers. She identified EGFR as a potential therapeutic target in NF1 peripheral nerve tumorigenesis, and has developed cell culture and mouse models of NF1 nerve tumorigenesis. Her laboratory has also used analysis of gene expression to identify critical genes in neurofibroma and their malignant derivatives, MPNST. 

    Dr. Ratner received her bachelor's from Brown University, her doctorate from Indiana University, and was a postdoctoral fellow at Washington University in St. Louis. She was a member of the faculty at the University of Cincinnati from 1987 to 2004. Dr. Ratner is currently a professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, and the program leader for Cancer Biology and Neural Tumors Program in the Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute where she holds the Beatrice C. Lampkin Endowed chair in cancer biology and serves as PI of the NINDS P50 “Cincinnati Center in NF Research”. 

    Dr. Ratner is an active member of the International Consortium on the Molecular Biology of NF1, NF2, and schwannomatosis and was a member of the advisory board for the National Neurofibromatosis Foundation (now Children’s Tumor Foundation) from 1989 to 2007. She chaired the Department of Defense Neurofibromatosis Research Program Integration Panel in 2008, and currently serves as a member of the James McDonnell Brain Tumor Research Advisory Board. She received the von Recklinghausen Award from the Children’s Tumor Foundation in 2010.

    Education and Training

    PhD: Indiana University, 1982.

    BA: Brown University, 1975.

    Fellowship: Washington University St. Louis, 1982-1987.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Mitogenic Activities in Neurofibromatosis. Principle Investigator. Sept 2011-2016. NIH-R01 NS 28840-20.
    A photo of Damien Reynaud.

    Damien Reynaud, PhD

    is an experimental hematologist interested in dissecting the cell-intrinsic and micro-environmental cues that regulate normal and pathological blood production. His research is focused on the molecular mechanisms that control normal B cell lymphopoiesis and how corruption of these mechanisms contributes to the development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and adults.

    513-803-4498
    damien.reynaud@cchmc.org

    Damien Reynaud, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-4498

    Email: damien.reynaud@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells; mechanisms of leukemic progression B cell development

    Biography

    Dr. Reynaud’s long-standing research interest is to understand the mechanisms controlling cell fate decisions in the hematopoietic system. During his graduate and post-graduate training, he worked to decipher the transcriptional regulatory networks that (i) control self-renewal activity and lineage specification in hematopoietic stem cells and (ii) regulate progenitor differentiation during the establishment of the natural and adaptive immune system. More recently he investigated the deregulation in stem and progenitor cell activity that, in adults, leads to the development of abnormal hematopoiesis and eventually to chronic myeloid leukemia. This work uncovered an unexpected contribution of the pro-inflammatory environment to leukemia development. Notably he identified a novel function for the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 in reprogramming the fate of an early leukemic progenitor by promoting myeloid development at the expense of lymphoid differentiation. Following this work, the overall goal of his research at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical center is to characterize how micro-environmental signals regulate normal B lymphoid and how corruption of these signals contribute to the initiation, maintenance and progression of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Education and Training

    PhD: University Renee Descartes, Paris, France, 2004.

    Postdoctoral Fellow: University of Chicago/HHMI, Chicago, IL, 2008; University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 2013.

    Publications

    View Dr. Reynaud's PubMed Publications
    A photo of Daniel Starczynowski.

    Daniel T. Starczynowski, PhD

    is a cancer biologist who has a basic research programs with a translational emphasis in myeloid hematological malignancies. His lab’s major effort is studying the molecular and cellular basis of myelodysplastic syndromes, bone marrow failure syndromes and acute leukemia. The goal is to identify candidate genes and understand their contribution to myeloid malignancies.
    Visit the Starczynowski Lab.

    513-803-5317
    daniel.starczynowski@cchmc.org

    Daniel T. Starczynowski, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-5317

    Email: daniel.starczynowski@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Visit the Starczynowski Lab.

    Biography

    Daniel T. Starczynowski, PhD, received his PhD in Molecular Biology from Boston University. He studied the NF-kB family of transcription factors and their role in B-cell lymphomas. During his postdoctoral fellowship at the BC Cancer Research Center, Dr. Starczynowski identified and characterized novel candidate genes in Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    Following his postdoctoral training, Dr. Starczynowski joined the faculty at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and at the University of Cincinnati as an Assistant Professor. Dr. Starczynowski’s laboratory is continuing to investigate the molecular and cellular basis of MDS. The current objective of his research program is to understand the contribution of MDS-associated miRNAs and their targeted genes to the pathogenesis of MDS and progression to AML. He hopes that understanding some of the molecular causes of MDS will enhance our insight into the biology of MDS, and provide novel targeted therapies.

    Education and Training

    BS: Fairleigh Dickinson University, Teaneck, NJ, 2000.

    PhD: Boston University, Boston, MA, 2006.

    Postdoctoral Fellow: University of British Columbia/BC Cancer Research Centre, Vancouver, Canada, 2010.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Regulation and Function of TIFAB in Myelodysplastic Syndrome. Department of Defense. Jun 2011 - May 2014. #W81XWH1110468.
    A photo of Johannes van der Loo.

    Johannes van der Loo, PhD Director, Aseptic Processing Laboratories

    is director of the Aseptic Processing Laboratories, director of the Viral Vector Core and chair of the Institutional Biosafety Committee. His team continues to provide both GMP and Research-grade viral vector products to investigators locally, nationally and internationally using a fee-for-service model.

    513-803-1066
    Han.vanderloo@cchmc.org

    Johannes van der Loo, PhD

    Director, Aseptic Processing Laboratories

    Director, Vector Production Facility

    Director, Research Viral Vector Core

    Academic Information

    UC Department of Pediatrics

    Field Service Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-1066

    Fax: 513-636-1446

    Email: Han.vanderloo@cchmc.org

    Show All

    Specialties

    Development, scale-up and clinical production of viral vectors and cellular products

    Biography

    Dr. van der Loo has been employed by Cincinnati Children's since 2002 where he is the Director of the Aseptic Processing Laboratories, an ISO Class 7 and 8 cleanroom facility for the manufacture of GMP-grade viral vectors and manipulation of GMP/GTP-grade cellular products for phase I/II Clinical Trials in compliance US federal and European guidelines. In addition, he is the director of the Vector Production Facility, the director of the Research Viral Vector Core and the chair of the Cincinnati Children's Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC). His previous appointment as assistant professor (1998-2002) was with the Department of Hematology/Oncology and Transplantation, at the University of Minnesota School of Medicine, in Minneapolis, MN. 

    Dr. van der Loo is the director of the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center's Aseptic Processing Laboratories, Vector Production Facility and Research Viral Vector Core.

    Education and Training

    BS: Biology, State University of Utrecht, the Netherlands, 1983.

    MS: Medical Biology, State University of Utrecht, the Netherlands, 1987.

    Teaching degree: Biology, State University of Utrecht, Netherlands, 1989.

    PhD: Hematology, Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands, 1995.

    Postdoctoral Fellowship: Hematology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN, 1994-1998.

    Publications

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    Grants

    Novel Scalable Vector Production Systems Development Core. Principle Investigator. CCTST PCS T1 Pilot Collaborative Studies Grant funded by Institutional Clinical and Translational Science Award, NIH/NCRR. Jul 2013 - Jun 2015. 8UL1TR000077-04.
    A photo of Ronald Waclaw.

    Ronald R. Waclaw, MS, PhD

    is a developmental neurobiologist who has a research program in forebrain development and function. His lab studies the molecular genetic mechanisms in forebrain progenitor cell differentiation. One focus of his lab is to determine the effect of known “RASopathy” genes, which result in abnormalities in RAS/MAPK signaling, on brain development and brain tumor formation. 

    513-803-3336
    ronald.waclaw@cchmc.org

    Ronald R. Waclaw, MS, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-3336

    Email: ronald.waclaw@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Forebrain progenitor cell differentiation; “RASopathy” genes

    Education and Training

    BA: Biology, North Central College, Naperville, IL 1997.

    MS: Department of Biology, Ball State University, Muncie, IN, 1997-1999.

    PhD:Molecular and Developmental Biology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, 1999-2005.

    Fellowship: Division of Developmental Biology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 2005-2010.

    Publications

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    A photo of Susanne Wells.

    Susanne Wells, PhD Director, Epithelial Carcinogenesis and Stem Cell Program

    focuses on new targets of the HPV E6/E7 oncogenes, and characterizing these as potential risk factors for HPV infection and transformation. Research approaches include bioinformatics; analyses of primary, transformed and 3D cell culture systems; and mouse tumor models to facilitate translational endeavors. 
    Visit the Wells Lab.

    513-636-5986
    susanne.wells@cchmc.org

    Susanne Wells, PhD

    Director, Epithelial Carcinogenesis and Stem Cell Program

    Director, Postdoctoral Office

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-5986

    Fax: 513-636-3549

    Email: susanne.wells@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Squamous cell carcinoma; mechanisms by which the HPV oncogenes subvert the host cell machinery to promote abnormal cell growth and cancer; role of specific cellular HPV targets in viral replication and cellular transformation

    Visit the Wells Lab.

    Biography

    Susanne Wells graduated from the University of Konstanz, Germany, with a degree in Biology. She completed her PhD in Molecular Biology at the State University of Stony Brook, NY, and her Postdoctoral Fellowship at Harvard Medical School, MA. Dr. Wells moved to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center in 2002 to study human papillomavirus infection and associated carcinogenesis.

    Education and Training

    BS: Biology, University of Konstanz, Germany, 1992.

    PhD: Molecular Genetics, State University of Stony Brook, NY, 1997.

    Postdoctoral Fellowship: Molecular Virology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

    Publications

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    Grants

    Research Innovation Fund Award
    Title:
    Identification of FA disease biomarkers using NMR-based metabonomics
    PI: Susanne Wells
    Project Period: 2013-2014
    Funding by: Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center


    2R01 CA116316
    Title:
    Role and regulation of the human DEK proto-oncogene
    PI: Susanne Wells
    Project Period: 2012 – 2017
    Funding by: National Institutes of Health

    DOD Idea Award
    Title:
    Targeting the Ron-DEK signaling axis in breast cancer
    PI: Susanne Wells and Susan Waltz
    Project Period: 2012 – 2014
    Funding by: Department of Defense

    2R01 CA102357
    Title:
    Fanconi Anemia and HPV transformation
    PI: Susanne Wells
    Project Period: 2009 – 2014
    Funding by: National Institutes of Health

    A photo of Jianqiang Wu.

    Jianqiang Wu, MD, MS

    focuses on preclinical therapeutic trials studying neurofibroma and cancer stem cell(s) in neurofibroma.

    513-636-0955
    jianqiang.wu@cchmc.org

    Jianqiang Wu, MD, MS

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-0955

    Fax: 513-803-0783

    Email: jianqiang.wu@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Preclinical therapeutic trial on neurofibroma; cancer stem cell(s) in neurofibroma

    Education and Training

    MD: Soochow University College of Medicine, SooChow, P.R. China, 1991.

    MS: Soochow University College of Medicine, SooChow, P.R. China, 1996.

    Publications

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    A photo of Mei Xin.

    Mei Xin, PhD

    studies the mechanisms of heart growth, regeneration and vascular development. Dr. Xin’s research focuses on the identification and characterization of critical transcriptional and post-transcriptional molecules, as well as the signaling networks that control cardiovascular development and disease. These studies may provide insight towards therapeutic interventions for cardiovascular disorders.

    513-803-3464
    mei.xin@cchmc.org

    Mei Xin, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-3464

    Email: mei.xin@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Cardiovascular development; heart growth and regeneration; cardiomyocyte proliferation.

    Biography

    Mei Xin received her PhD from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. She completed her postdoctoral training in Eric Olson’s laboratory where she investigated microRNAs and signaling molecules regulating smooth muscle and cardiac muscle growth. In August 2013, Dr. Xin moved to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center to study cardiovascular development and diseases.

    Education and Training

    MS: Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ.

    PhD: The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.

    Postdoctoral Fellowship: The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.

    Publications

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