Infectious Diseases

  • Research Faculty

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    Division Head

    A photo of Robert W. Frenck Jr.

    Robert W. Frenck Jr., MD Interim Director, Division of Infectious Diseases

    has been working on the clinical testing of the 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine. Current trials include use of the vaccine in children who have undergone bone marrow transplant. He also developed evaluation of a model for norovirus infection, and will be leading a series of clinical trials to test a new candidate vaccine to prevent infections by Shigella.

    513-803-3164
    robert.frenck@cchmc.org

    Robert W. Frenck Jr., MD

    Interim Director, Division of Infectious Diseases

    Medical Director, Division of Infectious Diseases

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-3164

    Fax: 513-636-3959

    Email: robert.frenck@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Clinical

    Vaccine research; enteric diseases; travel medicine

    Research

    Enteric diseases; vaccinology

    Biography

    Robert W. Frenck Jr., MD, received his undergraduate degree from the University of California at San Diego in 1977 followed by his doctor of medicine degree from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston in 1981. He trained at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, completing his pediatric residency in 1984. After three years as a general pediatrician at the US Naval Hospital, Japan, he entered pediatric infectious disease fellowship training at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, which he completed in 1990. Dr. Frenck is board-certified in both pediatrics and infectious diseases.

    Dr. Frenck's research interests include therapeutic and vaccine clinical trials with special interest in enteric diseases. After completing a 25-year career in the Navy, Dr. Frenck joined the UCLA Center for Vaccine Research in 2004 and served until 2006 as director of the Center and a Professor of Pediatrics at UCLA School of Medicine. Dr. Frenck has been active in the American Academy of Pediatrics and currently serves on the Red Book Committee. He is an acknowledged authority in infectious diseases and has authored over 60 articles and book chapters on various aspects of this subject.

    Education and Training

    BA: University of California at San Diego, San Diego, CA, 1977. 

    MD: University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX, 1981. 

    Internship and Residency: US Naval Hospital, Bethesda, MD, 1981-1984. 

    Fellowship: Pediatric Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX, 1987-1990.

    Publications

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    Faculty

    A photo of David Bernstein.

    David I. Bernstein, MD, MA Director, Gamble Program and VTEU

    conducts clinical vaccine trials, including trials involving infants and the elderly that are supported by the NIH through the Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit which he directs at Cincinnati Children’s. His special interest is the pathogenesis and immunobiology of herpes viruses (herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus). 

    513-636-7625
    david.bernstein@cchmc.org

    David I. Bernstein, MD, MA

    Director, Gamble Program and VTEU

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-7625

    Fax: 513-636-7682

    Email: david.bernstein@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Rotavirus; herpes simplex virus; cytomegalovirus; preclinical and clinical evaluations of vaccine; immune response to herpes virus

    Research Interests

    Evaluation of vaccines and antivirals for herpes and rotovirus; development of improved adjuvants and delivery systems for vaccines; treatment and prevention of influenza, norovirus and parvovirus infections

    Biography

    Dr. Bernstein received his MA degree in microbiology and his MD degree from SUNY at Buffalo. His pediatric training was undertaken at USC and the New England Medical Center. This was followed by an ID fellowship at UCLA.

    During his fellowship he became interested in herpes viruses and vaccines. Upon arrival at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center he began his work investigating the immunobiology of genital herpes infections. At this time he also became interested in rotavirus and along with his colleague Dr. Richard Ward he investigated the immune responses that provide protection.

    This work led to the development of a live attenuated human rotavirus vaccine initially named 89-12. The 89-12 vaccine was further modified and became the GlaxoSmithKline rotavirus vaccine, Rotarix, currently available in over 100 countries including the USA and EU. Dr. Bernstein is currently evaluating vaccines for CMV, HSV, influenza, avian influenza, RSV, norovirus and parvovirus. Dr. Bernstein has published over 200 manuscripts and book chapters on infectious diseases, vaccines and antivirals. Dr. Bernstein is currently the Albert Sabin Professor of pediatrics and director of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Cincinnati Children’s and directs one of eight NIH funded Vaccine Evaluation Units.

    Education and Training

    MA: Microbiology, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 1973.

    MD: State University of New York at Buffalo School of Medicine, Buffalo, NY, 1977.

    Residency: Pediatrics, University of Southern California Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA; Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA.

    Fellowship: Pediatric Infectious Disease, University of California, Los Angeles, CA.

    Certification: American Board of Medical Examiners, 1978; American Board of Pediatrics, 1981; Pediatrics, 1982.

    Publications

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    Grants

    Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units (VTEUs): Evaluation of Control Measures Against Diseases Other Than AIDS. Principal Investigator. 2007 - 2014. #NO1-AI-80006.

    No photo available

    Steven Black, MD

    is focusing on the evaluation of vaccine safety, vaccine efficacy and the epidemiology of vaccine preventable diseases in the United States but especially in the developing world. He is interested in fostering collaborative efforts to improve vaccine safety and effectiveness assessment in low and middle income countries.

    513-803-0747
    steven.black1@cchmc.org

    Steven Black, MD

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-0747

    Fax: 513-803-0903

    Email: steven.black1@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Vaccine safety and the use of computerized data to evaluate vaccines in the developed and developing world; vaccine clinical trials

    Education and Training

    MD: University of California, San Diego, 1973

    Residency: Pediatrics, Kaiser Hospital, San Fransisco CA; Infectious Disease, University of California, San Fransisco CA

    Certification: Pediatrics, 1980; Pediatric Infectious Diseases, 1995

    Publications

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    Rebecca C. Brady, MD Director, Adult Clinical Services

    is interested in adult vaccines and influenza. Dr. Brady is the PI for funded clinical trials of influenza vaccines in children and adults.

    513-636-4578
    rebecca.brady@cchmc.org

    Rebecca C. Brady, MD

    Director, Adult Clinical Services

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4578

    Fax: 513-636-7655

    Email: rebecca.brady@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Adult and pediatric infectious disease

    Research Interests

    Cytomegalovirus and other viral infections 

    Education and Training

    MD: University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 1988.

    Residency: Internal Medicine/Pediatrics, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY.

    Fellowships: Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio; Adult Infectious Diseases, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH.

    Certifications: Pediatrics, 1992, recertified 1999; Internal Medicine, 1993; Pediatric Infectious Diseases, 1997; Adult Infectious Diseases, 1997.

    Publications

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    A photo of Rhonda Cardin.

    Rhonda Cardin, PhD

    studies the viral/host interactions that contribute to cytomegalovirus (CMV) pathogenesis and latency. Her lab recently identified the first CMV gene, M33, that plays a critical role in CMV latency. Her current studies aim to identify the mechanisms of M33 function in latency and may lead to therapies to control long-term latent CMV infection.

    513-636-2420
    rhonda.cardin@cchmc.org

    Rhonda Cardin, PhD

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-2420

    Email: rhonda.cardin@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    The research focus of the Cardin lab is to understand the virus-host interactions that are important for CMV pathogenesis and immunological control of long term latent CMV infection. CMV encodes viral homologs to host proteins (such as IL-10, TNF, chemokine receptors) that interfere with the host immune response by immune evasion or by mimicry. Understanding the advantages provided by 'hijacking' of host proteins by CMV will lead to the development of effective vaccine strategies.

    Education and Training

    BA: Biology and Psychology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, 1983.

    PhD: Microbiology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 1989.

    Publications

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    A photo of Beverly Connelly.

    Beverly L. Connelly, MD Director, Infection Control Program

    is interested in the epidemiology of vaccine-preventable diseases with a particular focus on influenza and pertussis. She is also interested in the epidemiology and prevention of healthcare-associated infections with a focus on device-related infections. In addition, she is interested in healthcare quality improvement initiatives.

    513-636-8492
    beverly.connelly@cchmc.org

    Beverly L. Connelly, MD

    Director, Infection Control Program

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-8492

    Fax: 513-636-7598

    Email: beverly.connelly@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Education and Training

    MD: Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Ga., 1979.

    Residency: Pediatrics, Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1979-1982.

    Fellowship: Pediatric Infectious Disease, Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1983-1986.

    Certification: Pediatrics, 1984; Pediatric Infectious Diseases, 1994, recertified, 2000.

    A photo of Lara Danziger-Isakov.

    Lara A. Danziger-Isakov, MD, MPH Director, Transplant ID

    is a clinician and clinical researcher focusing on infections in immunocompromised hosts, primarily transplant recipients. She studies the interactions among infection, immunity and graft outcomes in pediatric transplantation. Additionally, Dr. Danziger-Isakov studies immunizations and infectious disease risk assessment in pediatric solid organ transplantation.

    513-636-4578
    lara.danziger-isakov@cchmc.org

    Lara A. Danziger-Isakov, MD, MPH

    Director, Transplant ID

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4578

    Email: lara.danziger-isakov@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Transplant infectious diseases

    Biography

    Dr. Danziger-Isakov began her research career investigating cytomegalovirus in pediatric lung transplant recipients. After completing fellowship she led an international epidemiological study of pediatric lung transplant recipients including 14 international sites from North America and Europe to publish seminal manuscripts on fungal and viral infections through the International Pediatric Lung Transplant Collaborative. While at the Cleveland Clinic she performed an innovative investigation evaluating alloreactive cellular and humoral responses to influenza vaccine in transplant recipients. She is the protocol chair for two NIH-funded pediatric transplant studies in the Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation in Pediatrics (CTOT-C) entitled "Viral Triggers of Alloimmunity and Autoimmunity in Pediatric Lung Transplantation (CTOTC-03)" and "Perceived Barriers to Patient Adherence after Pediatric Solid Organ Transplantation (CTOTC-05)" with principal investigator Stuart Sweet at Washington University. 

    Dr. Danziger-Isakov is a member of several international organizations, with guest lectureships throughout the North America and Europe. She has been recognized with the Clinical Science Career Development Award from the American Society of Transplantation in 2012, has been elected as co-editor for the American Society of Transplantation’s 3rd Edition of the Infectious Diseases Guidelines, and served as Infectious Disease Council Chair for the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation.

    Education and Training

    MD: Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, 1997.

    MPH: Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO, 2004.

    Residency: Pediatrics, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, 1997-2000.

    Fellowship: Pediatric Infectious Diseases, St. Louis Children’s Hospital, Washington Univeristy, St. Louis, MO, 2000-2003.

    Certification: Pediatrics, 2000; Pediatric Infectious Diseases, 2003.

    Publications

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    Hitesh Deshmukhj, MD, PhD

    and his laboratory focuses on the role of intestinal commensal bacteria in development of appropriate innate immune responses to pathogens in neonates. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop novel therapeutic approaches to decrease mortality in premature babies, one of the most vulnerable groups.

    513-803-7448
    hitesh.deshmukh@cchmc.org

    Hitesh Deshmukhj, MD, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-7448

    Email: hitesh.deshmukh@cchmc.org

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    Education and Training

    MB; BS: University of Mumbai, Mumbai, India, 2001.

    PhD: University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, 2006.

    Residency: Pediatrics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 2011.

    Fellowship: Neonatology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 2014.  

    Certification: American Board of Pediatrics, 2012.

    Publications

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    Grants

    Developmental Regulation of Host Resistance and Innate Immune Response by Intestinal MicrobesPrincipal Investigator. Children’s Hospital Research Foundation. July 2012 – June 2015.
    A photo of David Haslam.

    David B. Haslam, MD Director, Antimicrobial Stewardship Program

    is a pediatric infectious diseases physician who has research programs investigating the host and microbial factors that contribute to disease severity and outcome during Clostridium difficile infection. As medical director of the Antimicrobial Stewardship Program, he is initiating additional research programs on the interplay between antibiotic exposure, the host microbiome, and the molecular epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance.

    513-803-1170
    david.haslam@cchmc.org

    David B. Haslam, MD

    Director, Antimicrobial Stewardship Program

    Clinical Director, Division of Infectious Diseases

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-1170

    Email: david.haslam@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Pediatric infectious diseases; host-microbial interactions; innate immunity

    Education and Training

    MD: University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, 1987.

    Rotating Internship: McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, 1988.

    Residency: University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Quebec, 1991.

    Fellowship: Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 2005.

    Certification: Pediatric Infectious Diseases, 1997.

    Publications

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    A photo of Andrew Herr.

    Andrew B. Herr, PhD

    studies protein-protein interactions involved in immune receptor signaling and bacterial pathogenesis. His lab uses X-ray crystallography to solve the atomic structures of proteins along with techniques of biophysical chemistry to understand their interactions in solution. The goal is to understand the molecular basis for autoimmune responses and recurrent bacterial infections, and to develop new therapeutic applications.

    513-803-7490
    andrew.herr@cchmc.org

    Andrew B. Herr, PhD

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-7490

    Email: andrew.herr@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Research

    Structural biology and biophysics of antibodies; immune receptors; bacterial surface proteins

    Biography

    Andrew Herr, PhD, is an associate professor in the Division of Immunobiology and Center for Systems Immunology, with an affiliate appointment in the Division of Infectious Diseases. Dr. Herr completed his thesis work in molecular biophysics from Washington University in St. Louis, and completed his postdoctoral work in structural immunology at the California Institute of Technology as a Damon Runyon Research Fellow. He was recruited to the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine as an Ohio Eminent Scholar in Structural Biology before moving to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital.

    Dr. Herr solved the first structure of a human IgA1 antibody bound to its cognate Fc receptor while at Caltech, and his lab has continued to study antibodies and immune receptors implicated in autoimmune diseases. In addition, the lab is studying a family of related collagen-specific immune receptors such as glycoprotein VI, which activates platelets upon exposure to fibrous collagen. The Herr lab also studies mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis. Specifically, they discovered the zinc-dependent mechanism of intercellular adhesion in bacterial biofilms formed by Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. aureus. Biofilms are specialized bacterial colonies that are highly resistant to antibiotics and immune responses, so developing novel therapies to prevent biofilm formation is of high importance.

    Before joining the faculty at Cincinnati Children’s, Dr. Herr was an Ohio Eminent Scholar in Structural Biology at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and served as an associate director of the Cincinnati Medical Scientist (MD/PhD) Training Program. Dr. Herr received the 2014 Emerging Entrepreneurial Achievement Faculty Award from UC for his work to commercialize a novel anti-infective therapy based on his lab’s research.

    Education and Training

    BA: Oral Roberts University, Tulsa, OK, 1993.

    PhD: Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, MO, 1999.

    Postdoc: California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 2003.

    Publications

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    Grants

    Studies of metal-dependent intercellular adhesion in Staphylococcal biofilms. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Sep 2011 – Jun 2015. NIH R01 GM094363.

    Analytical tools for the analysis of clustered O-glycans in clinical samples. Principal Investigator of Sub-contract. National Institutes of Health. Sep 2011 – Jul 2015. NIH R01 GM098539.

    A photo of Margaret Hostetter.

    Margaret K. Hostetter, MD BK Rachford Professor and Chair, Department of Pediatrics

    studies the pathogenesis of bloodstream infections caused by the yeast Candida albicans. Her work has highlighted the role of C. albicans in biofilms, activation of human T cells, and evasion of innate immune mechanisms. Her clinical research is focused on the medical evaluation of internationally adopted children.

    513-636-4509
    margaret.hostetter@cchmc.org

    Margaret K. Hostetter, MD

    BK Rachford Professor and Chair, Department of Pediatrics

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4509

    Email: margaret.hostetter@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Bacterial and fungal infections; medical evaluation of internationally adopted children

    Education and Training

    MD: Baylor College of Medicine.

    Residency: Boston Children’s Hospital.

    Training Fellowship: Boston Children’s Hospital.

    Board Certification: Pediatrics; Pediatric Infectious Diseases.
    A photo of Xi Jason Jiang.

    Xi Jason Jiang, PhD

    focuses on enteric viruses causing acute gastroenteritis, mainly the human noroviruses and rotaviruses. His major approaches include molecular virology, recombinant technology, epidemiology, immunology and bioinformatics. He is also interested in development of vaccine and antivirals against these important pathogens.

    513-636-0119
    jason.jiang@cchmc.org

    Xi Jason Jiang, PhD

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-0119

    Fax: 513-636-7655

    Email: jason.jiang@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Infectious diseases; viral gastroenteritis

    Education and Training

    BS: Public Health, Shanghai Medical University, 1978.

    PhD: Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, 1988.

    Post-doctoral fellow: Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, 1993.

    Publications

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    A photo of Monica McNeal.

    Monica Malone McNeal, MS Associate Director, Laboratory of Specialized Clinical Studies

    directs the Laboratory for Specialized Clinical Studies, which develops and performs state-of-the-art assays for assessment of viruses and human immune responses.

    513-636-7648
    monica.mcneal@cchmc.org

    Monica Malone McNeal, MS

    Associate Director, Laboratory of Specialized Clinical Studies

    Academic Information

    Instructor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-7648

    Fax: 513-636-0950

    Email: monica.mcneal@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Vaccine development; rotavirus; influenza and CMV

    Research Interests

    Immunology of rotavirus infection

    Biography

    Monica Malone McNeal, MS, is a virologist in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. She has more than 23 years of experience in rotavirus research. She has established an adult mouse model that has been used extensively in this facility and labs around the world. Her major expertise is in immunology and vaccine development. Currently she is the Associate Director of the Laboratory for Specialized Clinical Studies. This lab provides support for clinical studies involved in vaccine development. They perform work for several major pharmaceutical companies in addition to supporting other clinical researchers at Cincinnati Children’s.

    Education and Training

    MS: University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, 1981.

    Publications

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    Grant C. Paulsen, MD

    conducts clinical research complementary to his clinical role focusing on infectious complications in immune compromised hosts. Dr. Paulsen explores issues related to vaccination in the post-transplant setting, management of viral infections in immune compromised hosts and the impact of pre-transplant infectious disease evaluation.

    513-636-4578
    grant.paulsen@cchmc.org

    Grant C. Paulsen, MD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-4578

    Email: grant.paulsen@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Clinical

    Transplant infectious diseases

    Biography

    Dr. Paulsen began his research career investigating Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and its impact on the immune system of pediatric renal transplant recipients as well as analysis of risk factors for EBV viremia after renal transplantation. These results were presented at the World Transplant Congress 2014 with the full manuscript in process.

    Education and Training

    MD: University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO, 2005.

    Residency: Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 2005-2009.

    Fellowship: Adult and Pediatric Infectious Diseases, University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL 2010-2014.

    Certification: Internal Medicine, 2009; Pediatrics, 2010.

    Publications

    A photo of Joseph Qualls.

    Joseph E. Qualls, PhD

    examines the cellular and molecular facets of macrophage biology during health and disease. This white blood cell has an unprecedented role in regulating inflammation, pathogen elimination and maintaining tissue homeostasis. Specifically, Dr. Qualls’ laboratory focuses on amino acid utilization by macrophages, and how this affects the outcome of infection and inflammatory disease.

    513-636-9102
    joseph.qualls@cchmc.org

    Joseph E. Qualls, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-9102

    Email: joseph.qualls@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Immunology; innate immunity; macrophage biology; amino acid metabolism; intracellular pathogenesis 

    Biography

    Dr. Qualls completed his undergraduate work in 2002, receiving his BA summa cum laude in biology from Thomas More College in Crestview Hills, Kentucky. He then joined the laboratory of Don Cohen, PhD, in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics at the University of Kentucky, where he studied the role of macrophages and dendritic cells during the development of inflammatory bowel disease. After defending his thesis and receiving his PhD in 2007, Dr. Qualls began his postdoctoral training with Peter Murray, PhD, in the Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, where his research helped to define the functional plasticity of macrophages in response to infection and cancer. During his postdoctoral training, Dr. Qualls received a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award and actively participated as vice chair of Mentoring Activities within the Postdoctoral Association Council and as a member of the Education Programs Committee.

    Dr. Qualls’ long-term goals are to understand the interplay between nutrition, metabolism and immune regulation during anti-pathogen defense. He has focused on how macrophages use the amino acid, L-arginine, to combat intracellular pathogens. As a starting point to appreciate broader principles of immunity and metabolism he established a map of L-arginine metabolism at the transcriptomic and metabolomic levels. His laboratory now uses this map to dissect how L-arginine generates anti-microbial effectors, how this pathway is regulated, and how microbes can hijack the pathway. His current research has two complementary tracks that retain initial focus on L-arginine metabolism in macrophages, but will eventually broaden into larger issues concerning metabolism in immunity.

    Current research: Many groups have shown that T cell function is inhibited via byproducts of L-arginine metabolism or when extracellular L-arginine becomes limiting. In one project, the laboratory is focused on characterizing the in vivo function of L-arginine utilization by macrophages during mycobacterial infection, and how this affects anti-pathogen T cell function. In parallel, the laboratory is addressing the provocative role of L-arginine biosynthesis from L-citrulline during intracellular infection, and how this mechanism is regulated at the cellular level. While greatly unexplored, this pathway of amino acid recycling is vital as mice deficient in L-arginine biosynthesis, compared to normal mice, lack efficient control of both M. bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infection.

    Education and Training

    BA: Thomas More College, Crestview Hills, KY, 2002.

    PhD: University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 2007.

    Postdoctoral Fellowship: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, 2012.

    Publications

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    Grants

    Consequences of amino acid limitation on immune function. Principle Investigator. Cincinnati Children’s TAPS Program, Trustee Award. Jan. 2013 – Dec. 2014.
    No photo available

    Nancy M. Sawtell, PhD

    leads studies of herpes simplex virus and has identified VP16, the first gene essential for triggering the virus’s emergence from its latent state in the human nervous system. Reactivation of the virus in the brains of older mice carrying the human APOE 4 gene to leads to lesions that resemble Alzheimer’s.
    Visit the Sawtell Lab.

    513-636-7880
    nancy.sawtell@cchmc.org

    Nancy M. Sawtell, PhD

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-7880

    Fax: 513-636-7655

    Email: nancy.sawtell@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Molecular mechanisms of herpes virus latency and reactivation; viral persistence; pathogenesis; animal models of disease

    Visit the Sawtell Lab.

    Education and Training

    BA: Chemistry, Case Western Reserve University, 1975.

    PhD: Pathology and Immunology, University of Cincinnati Medical College, Cincinnati, OH, 1986.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Dr. Elizabeth Schlaudecker.

    Elizabeth P. Schlaudecker, MD, MPH

    uses epidemiology and clinical studies to explore the interplay between maternal and child immunologic responses to immunization. Past studies on respiratory viruses in Honduras have led to her current focus on immunologic responses to influenza. Her primary research goal is to improve the prevention of pediatric infectious diseases worldwide.

    513-803-5187
    elizabeth.schlaudecker@cchmc.org

    Elizabeth P. Schlaudecker, MD, MPH

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-5187

    Email: elizabeth.schlaudecker@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Global health; influenza; prevention of infant infection with maternal immunization

    Biography

    Elizabeth P. Schlaudecker, MD, MPH, is a faculty member in the Division of Infectious Diseases and the Global Health Center. Dr. Schlaudecker received her medical degree and master's in public health from the University of Cincinnati and completed a pediatrics residency and chief residency at Cincinnati Children's.

    Dr. Schlaudecker was awarded a Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellowship from the National Institutes of Health in 2009, and she investigated the etiology and seasonality of viral respiratory disease in Honduran children under the age of five. She was awarded the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society Blue Ribbon Research award in 2011 for similar work in Bangladesh. After joining the faculty of Cincinnati Children's in 2011, she continued her influenza research with a Procter Scholars award. Dr. Schlaudecker has traveled to Honduras, the Dominican Republic, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Kenya, South Africa, and Cameroon as part of her clinical and research training.

    Education and Training

    MD: University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, 2003.

    Residency: Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, 2006.

    Chief Residency: Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, 2007.

    Fellowship: Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, 2011.

    MPH: Public Health, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, 2011.

    Certification: Pediatrics, 2006.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Comparison of Immunological Responses to Influenza Infection and Immunization in Pregnant and Non-Pregnant Women. Principal Investigator. Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. 2011 - 2013.
    A photo of Mary Staat.

    Mary Allen Staat, MD, MPH Director, International Adoption Center

    is interested in population-based epidemiological surveillance studies in order to understand what viral and bacterial diseases are circulating at any given time, as well as to evaluate the efficacy of vaccines for these agents. She has also been a leader in the medical and psychological evaluation of internationally adopted children.

    513-636-2877
    mary.staat@cchmc.org

    Mary Allen Staat, MD, MPH

    Director, International Adoption Center

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-2877

    Fax: 513-636-6936

    Email: mary.staat@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Clinical Interests

    Helicobacter pylori, rotavirus epidemiology, travel medicine and infectious diseases of international adoptees

    Research Interests

    Epidemiology of enteric infections and surveillance of infectious diseases

    Biography

    Mary Allen Staat, MD, MPH, is director of the International Adoption Center and a member of the Infectious Disease Division at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

    Dr. Staat is a board-certified pediatrician and is also board-certified in Infectious Disease and Preventive Medicine. She is an associate professor of Pediatrics at the University of Cincinnati and a faculty member of the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Research Foundation.

    Education and Training

    MD: University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky., 1986.

    MPH: Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md., 1991.

    Residency: Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, 1986-1989; Preventive Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md., 1990-1994.

    Fellowship: Infectious Diseases, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, 1989-1990; Epidemiology, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Rockville, Md., 1990-1993.

    Certification: Pediatrics, 1989; Preventive Medicine, 1996; Pediatric Infectious Diseases, 1999.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Mark Steinhoff.

    Mark C. Steinhoff, MD Director, Global Health Center

    is interested in the broad effects of immunization in prevention of illness both in US and low-resource regions. The Mother’s Gift project of antenatal maternal immunization with influenza vaccine showed protection of mothers and their unvaccinated infants, as well as increased birth weights of the newborns. His team is currently evaluating antenatal influenza vaccine in 3,600 pregnant women in S. Asia to assess the broader effects of prevention of influenza. In Cincinnati, they are evaluating the safety and immunogenicity of influenza vaccines provided to mothers after delivery. They are also carrying out a prospective antepartum influenza vaccine study to assess the differences in immune response between healthy pregnant and nonpregnant women.

    513-636-1376
    mark.steinhoff@cchmc.org

    Mark C. Steinhoff, MD

    Director, Global Health Center

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-1376

    Fax: 513-803-0903

    Email: mark.steinhoff@cchmc.org

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    Education and Training

    MD: University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, 1973.

    Residency and Chief Residency: Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York.

    Fellowship, Infectious Diseases: University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York.

    Certification: New York State Medical License, 1976; Pediatrics, 1978; Tamil Nadu Medical Council (India), 1980; Michigan Medical License, 1985; Maryland Medical License, 1986; Ohio Medical License, 2010; Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, 1988.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
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    Ming Tan, PhD

    is interested in understanding the initial steps of human norovirus infection and in developing strategies to prevent the infection. His research focuses on the structure-function relationship of norovirus capsid to understand how norovirus interacts with host cells through the viral receptors that have recently been identified as human histo-blood group antigens.

    513-636-0510
    ming.tan@cchmc.org

    Ming Tan, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-0510

    Fax: 513-636-7655

    Email: ming.tan@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Noroviruses; human caliciviruses; viral gastroenteritis

    Education and Training

    PhD University of Münster, Münster, Germany, 1997.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Noroviral P particle, a multifunctional platform for vaccine development. Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. June 2011 - May 2013.

    Norwalk-like viruses and their receptors. Co-Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Sep 2010 - Apr 2015.

    Novel vaccine against norovirus. Co-Principal Investigator. National Institutes of Health. May 2010 -  Apr 2015.

    A photo of Sing Sing Way.

    Sing Sing Way, MD, PhD Pauline and Lawson Reed Chair, Division of Infectious Diseases

    is an infectious disease physician-scientist. He cares for infants and children with infection related illness, and provides consultation in the diagnosis and prevention diseases caused by communicable agents. Dr. Way supervises an active basic research laboratory that uses basic immunological approaches to investigate ways to boost host defense and protection against infection. If you have interest in this work, please contact Dr. Way.

    513-636-7603
    singsing.way@cchmc.org

    Sing Sing Way, MD, PhD

    Pauline and Lawson Reed Chair, Division of Infectious Diseases

    Academic Information

    Associate Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-636-7603

    Email: singsing.way@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Infectious diseases; prenatal infection; immunology

    Biography

    Dr. Way is an infectious disease physician-scientist. He cares for infants and children with infection related illness, and provides consultation in the diagnosis and prevention diseases caused by communicable agents. Dr. Way supervises an active basic research laboratory that uses basic immunological approaches to investigate ways to boost host defense and protection against infection. Ongoing projects investigate the immune basis responsible for enhanced susceptibility to infection during pregnancy, the immune pathogenesis of pregnancy complications that occur with maternal infection, and the basic signals required for stimulating immune cell activation.

    Dr. Way trained in the combined MD/PhD program at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, pediatric residency at the University of California San Francisco, and infectious disease fellowship at the University of Washington. During fellowship training, Dr. Way began investigating the basic immunology and immune pathogenesis of infectious diseases relevant to human, and in particular, infant and child health.

    Dr. Way’s research has been supported by the National Institutes of Health since 2006. Dr. Way’s research has been described in many publications in numerous prestigious scientific journals including Nature, Cell Host & Microbe, PLoS Pathogens, and The Journal of Immunology. The past and ongoing work has also been recognized by numerous prestigious awards including the Infectious Diseases Society of America Wyeth Young Investigator Award, a Basil O’ Conner Award from the March of Dimes Foundation, and the Investigator in Pathogenesis of Infectious Diseases award from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund. 

    Education and Training

    MD PhD: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, 1999.

    Residency: University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 2001.

    Fellowship: University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 2004.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Grants

    Maternal regulatory T cells control the immune pathogenesis of prenatal infection. Principal Investigator in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease. Burroughs Wellcome Fund. 2012-2017.

    The immune pathogenesis of prenatal Listeria monocytogenes infection. Principle Investigator. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). 2012-2017. R01-AI100934.

    Regulatory T cells dictate the immunity during persistent Salmonella infection. Principle Investigator. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). 2010-2015. R01-AI087830.