• Research Faculty

  • A photo of Andrew D. Hershey.

    Andrew D. Hershey, MD, PhD, FAHS Director, Division of Neurology

    is interested in the characterization, molecular pathophysiology and neurophysiological, and outcome of pediatric and adolescent headache. This has extended from characterization of headache and changes across the ages and for specific headache and migraine types. The pathophysiology has included gene expression patterns of risk and response, mitochondrial cofactors and neurophysiological responses.

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Todd Arthur.

    Todd M. Arthur, MD Pediatric Epileptologist, Division of Neurology

    is interested in mild traumatic brain injuries (concussions) in children. It is hoped by approaching the diagnosis and treatment of concussion in a systematic manner that we can improve the quality of life and outcomes of children following mild traumatic brain injuries.

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Jamie Capal.

    Jamie K. Capal, MD Pediatric Neurologist, Division of Neurology

    has research interests focusing on children with autism spectrum disorders and related neurodevelopmental conditions. Current research projects include understanding the cognitive, behavioral, and language aspects of children with autism spectrum disorders and abnormal EEG but without concurrent clinical seizures. She is also involved in the Tuberous Sclerosis Clinic at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and related research projects.

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Jim Collins.

    James (Jim) J. Collins, MD, PhD

    focuses on improving outcomes in neuromuscular disorders. He is particularly interested in individuals affected with congenital muscular dystrophy. Research focuses on the development of common data elements, outcome measures and biomarker discovery in preparation for future clinical therapeutic trials.

    513-636-4222

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    Allen D. DeSena, MD, MPH

    does clinical research as it pertains to the emerging field of pediatric neuroimmunology. He has interest in determining best practices for patients in the acute and subacute period for neuroimmunologic conditions. He also has interest in endeavors to better manage pediatric patients with MS, NMO, transverse myelitis, and autoimmune encephalitis, such as anti-NMDA receptor antibody encephalitis.

    513-636-4222

    A photo of David Neal Franz.

    David Neal Franz, MD Director, Tuberous Sclerosis Clinic

    focuses on using a combination of clinical investigation, basic science research and innovative social programs to improve clinical care for patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). He and his team are active in human clinical trials with mTOR inhibitors to treat subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA), epilepsy and cognitive disabilities that occur in patients with TSC. In the laboratory, he is focused on understanding the mechanisms through which mTOR dysregulation in the brain contributes to TSC disease pathogenesis and developing suitable biomarkers capable of predicting disease severity and treatment response.

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Donald Gilbert.

    Donald L. Gilbert, MD, MS Director, Movement Disorder Clinic and Tourette's Syndrome Clinic

    is interested in motor control in children with Tourette syndrome, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and other conditions that affect movement. To do this, the team’s laboratory uses transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to measure signals in the motor control areas of the brain and measures motor coordination in the hands. The team is also using the TMS magnet to try to improve how the brain controls speech in adults who have suffered strokes; they hope to bring this type of treatment to children in the future. The team also does trials of new medications for Tourette syndrome.
    Visit the Gilbert/Wu Lab.

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Tracy Glauser.

    Tracy A. Glauser, MD Associate Director, Cincinnati Children's Research Foundation

    is the director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center and co-director of the Genetic Pharmacology Service. His research has focused on improving the care of children with epilepsy through identifying the genetic and non-heritable factors that underlie the inter-individual variation in response to antiepileptic medications. Since 2003, he has directed the NIH-funded Childhood Absence Epilepsy trial, a 31-center, 446-patient double-blind randomized comparative trial of three commonly used antiepileptic medications focused on identifying the optimal initial therapy for children with childhood absence epilepsy and the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and pharmacogenetic factors that impact the inter-individual response to antiepileptic therapy. Glauser and the Genetic Pharmacology Service have also developed and are testing treatment selection algorithms for epilepsy and non-epilepsy medications that incorporate genetic information and drug-drug interactions.

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Christina Gross.

    Christina Gross, PhD

    studies the molecular mechanisms underlying Fragile X syndrome and other autism spectrum and epilepsy disorders. In particular, the lab is interested in neuron-specific regulation of the PI3K pathway, and in the translational regulation of potassium channels crucial for neuronal excitability. The goal is to understand how defects in these mechanisms lead to neuronal diseases, and may serve as therapeutic targets. 

    Visit the Gross Lab. 

    513-636-3493

    A photo of Barbara Hallinan.

    Barbara E. Hallinan, MD, PhD Pediatric Neurologist, Division of Neurology

    focuses on investigating the neurochemical mechanisms responsible for the onset of epilepsy in infants, especially infantile spasms. Early diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy in this age group has the potential to improve developmental outcome. It is hoped that a better understanding of the pathogenesis of epilepsy in infants will shift the treatment paradigm from managing the clinical convulsions to correcting the underlying neurochemical pathology.

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Katherine D. Holland.

    Katherine D. Holland, MD, PhD Pediatric Epileptologist, Division of Neurology

    focuses on understanding the reasons medications fail to control seizures in certain people with epilepsy. This work includes development of clear definitions of drug response, analysis of genetic factors that predict treatment response and analyzing the neurophysiological differences between treatment responsive and treatment resistant epilepsy. The goal of this work is to predict treatment response so that care can be more individualized.

    A photo of Paul Horn.

    Paul S. Horn, PhD

    is a statistician who is part of the Division of Neurology. He works on various research projects including the data analysis of epilepsy and seizures, neuromuscular conditions, mitochondrial diseases, and migraines. His other statistical interests include robust and nonparametric methods and their application to the derivation of reference ranges.

    513-803-3256

    No photo available

    Sejal V. Jain, MD Director, Epilepsy-Sleep Clinical Program

    is interested in the field of sleep and epilepsy and their interactions. Working on identifying prevalence of sleep disorder, screening methods and ideal treatments for sleep disorders in patients with epilepsy. The goal is also to identify the impact of treatment of sleep disorders on seizure control in these patients.

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Marielle Kabbouche.

    Marielle A. Kabbouche, MD Child Neurologist, Division of Neurology

    is interested in acute treatment of intractable migraine headache including emergency room evaluation and treatment as well as inpatient therapies. The goal is not only to identify intractable headache but being able to identify short-term as well as long-term outcome to these interventions in children and adolescents.

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Darren Kadis.

    Darren S. Kadis, PhD

    studies brain-behavior relationships using modern neuroimaging techniques (i.e., MRI, MEG, etc.). His research is directed at understanding the typical organization of the brain, the role of early experience on brain structure and functional representation, and the vulnerability and plasticity of the brain in the context of early neurological insult.

    513-636-2577

    A photo of Darcy Krueger.

    Darcy A. Krueger, MD, PhD Associate Director of Research, Division of Neurology

    uses a combination of clinical investigation, basic science research and innovative social programs to improve clinical care for patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). We are active in human clinical trials with mTOR inhibitors to treat subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA), epilepsy and cognitive disabilities that occur in patients with TSC. In the laboratory, we are focused on understanding the mechanisms through which mTOR dysregulation in the brain contributes to TSC disease pathogenesis and developing suitable biomarkers capable of predicting disease severity and treatment response.

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Diego Morita, MD.

    Diego A. Morita, MD Co-Director, New Onset Seizure Clinic

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Hope O'Brien.

    Hope L. O'Brien, MD Director, Young Adult Headache Program, Division of Neurology

    is an adult neurologist, interested in the transition stages of chronic headache as one develops from childhood into adults, with focus on the unique aspects of headaches and its impact on late adolescents and young adults. This includes identifying modifiable features in children with migraine that will result in reduction of intractable cases as one develops.

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Douglas Rose, MD.

    Douglas F. Rose, MD Pediatric Epileptologist

    is interested in clinical neurophysiology of normal and abnormal brain function across multiple neuropsychiatric disorders using multiple modalities, principally electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The normal brain function includes developmental vision, hearing, touch perception, spontaneous motor movement, attention, memory, language and pain perception. The neuropsychiatric disorders include epilepsy, cerebral palsy, stroke, tic disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder and traumatic brain injury.

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Mark Schapiro.

    Mark Schapiro, MD

    is interested in identifying specific biomarkers for future neurological deficits, which may also serve as therapeutic targets in neonatal care. For example, premature newborns are at high risk for later neurological disorders due to disruption of normal brain development by prematurity, in association with ischemic and inflammatory injury in utero or in the perinatal period.

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Brian Siroky.

    Brian J. Siroky, PhD Research Associate, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension

    focuses on understanding the mechanisms of renal cyst and tumor formation that occur in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), and identification of targeted therapies for these lesions. Structural and functional relationships between renal epithelial primary cilia (specialized cellular organelles whose dysfunction is linked to cystogenesis) and mTOR signaling, the pathway that is dysregulated in TSC is also an area of interest.

    513-636-4497

    A photo of Matthew Skelton.

    Matthew R. Skelton, PhD

    is a neuroscientist who has a basic research program on the role of creatine in brain structure and function. The primary focus of his lab is the study of the mechanisms underlying intellectual disability caused by mutations in the creatine transporter gene.

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    Shannon M. Standridge, MPH, DO

    is interested in the specific field of pediatric neurology, focusing on cost effective analyses. She seeks to understand the significance of healthcare savings and the magnitude of improvement in quality of life over an expected lifetime in young children undergoing epilepsy surgery.

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Mary Sutton.

    Mary Sutton, MD

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Cameron Thomas.

    Cameron Thomas, MD, MS

    is interested in understanding the effects of early life events such as seizures, medical procedures and pain on the developing brain.  

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Jennifer Vannest.

    Jennifer J. Vannest, PhD

    is interested in the use of functional MRI and behavioral testing to examine how epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders affect language function and the brain circuitry that supports it. The goal of these studies is to provide better treatment and educational strategies for children with these disorders.

    513-636-6959

    A photo of Charles Vorhees.

    Charles V. Vorhees, PhD

    focuses on how drugs, genes, immune activators and environmental agents adversely affect the developing brain, along with Dr. Michael Williams. Projects range from early stress to prenatal exposure to drugs of abuse, from creatine transporter deficiency to genes associated with depression, and from lead-manganese toxicity to autism. The overarching interest is on developmental origins of nervous system disorders, particularly those originating prenatally using behavioral, neurochemical, immunohistochemical, pharmacological and genetic methods.
    Visit the Vorhees/Williams Lab.

    513-636-8622

    A photo of Anna Weber Byars.

    Anna Weber Byars, PhD, ABPP-Cn Pediatric Neuropsychologist

    is focused on neuropsychological and behavioral aspects of epilepsy. She also collaborates with researchers in the Imaging Research Center on studies of cognitive development as well as clinicians conducting clinical trials in genetic diseases.

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Kris Wesselkamper.

    Kris R. Wesselkamper, MD Pediatric Neurologist

    is interested in including quality improvement, safety and standardization of care for patients with neurologic conditions who are admitted to the hospital.

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Michael Williams.

    Michael T. Williams, PhD

    focuses on how drugs, genes, immune activators and environmental agents adversely affect the developing brain, along with Dr. Charles Vorhees. Projects range from early stress to prenatal exposure to drugs of abuse, from creatine transporter deficiency to genes associated with depression, and from lead-manganese toxicity to autism. The overarching interest is on developmental origins of nervous system disorders, particularly those originating prenatally using behavioral, neurochemical, immunohistochemical, pharmacological and genetic methods.
    Visit the Vorhees/Williams/Skelton Lab.

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Jonathan Wilson.

    Jonathan A. Wilson, PhD

    investigates the role and development of real-time, bedside analysis of neurological data in epilepsy and traumatic brain injury.

    513-803-4758

    A photo of Brenda Wong.

    Brenda Wong, MD, MBBS Director, Comprehensive Neuromuscular Center/MDA Clinic

    focuses on neuromuscular disorders in children including clinical research in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy and genomics in DMD and NM disorders.

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Steve Wu.

    Steve W. Wu, MD

    is interested in pediatric movement disorders, including Tourette syndrome. He is also actively involved in transcranial magnetic stimulation research.
    Visit the Gilbert/Wu Lab

    513-636-4222

    A photo of Jiang Xiang.

    Jing Xiang, MD, PhD Director of MEG Research

    focuses on the identification of pathological HFBS in epilepsy, migraine and other brain disorders. Dr. Xiang is currently building on recent discoveries that the brain generates high-frequency brain signals (HFBS, ~2,632 Hz) and that magnetoencephalography (MEG) can detect HFBS noninvasively.
    Visit the Xiang Lab.

    513-636-4222