• Determinants of Health Related Quality of Life in Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA)

    Collaborations with Division of Rheumatology, Daniel Lovell and, Hermine Brunner

    Objective

    The objective of the study is to determine the pathways by which medical variables (biological, physiological, clinical, physical function) and non-medical variables (individual, family, environmental characteristics) predict HRQOL in children being actively treated for JIA.

    Hypothesis

    Our central hypothesis is that, for children with JIA undergoing treatment, HRQOL is determined, in part, by biological, physiological, clinical, and functional variables and that individual, family, and environmental variables have both direct and indirect effects on HRQOL.

    The specific aims are:

    1. Determine the pathways by which medical variables (biological, physiological, clinical, physical function) predict HRQOL in children being treated for JIA.
    2. Determine the extent to which non-medical characteristics of the child, family, and environment explain additional variance, beyond medical factors, in HRQOL in children being treated for JIA.

    Rationale

    The rationale for the proposed research is that successful completion of this project will lead to a thorough understanding of the drivers of between-patient differences in HRQOL outcomes and to identification of additional therapeutic targets, thus enabling clinicians to maximize HRQOL for children with JIA and to maximize the effect of JIA treatments on HRQOL.

    Expected Outcomes

    It is anticipated that the study will yield the following expected outcomes:

    1. We will have a better understanding of determinants of HRQOL in children with JIA within the context of treatment.
    2. We will have identified specific, modifiable factors that could be targeted to improve HRQOL and to improve the effect of JIA treatments on HRQOL.
    3. We will have developed a rich database to reveal trends in these relationships over time and identify further areas for study.

    View more information about this study on the NIH website.