Reproductive Sciences

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    Division Director

    A photo of SK Dey.

    SK Dey, PhD Lova Riekert Chair and Professor of Pediatrics, Cancer and Cell Biology

    investigates the paracrine, autocrine and juxtacrine signaling networks that influence uterine biology in the context of embryo-uterine interactions during pregnancy. He also works on the effects of endocannabinoids on periimplantation events. Studies involving the molecular and genetic regulation of epithelial ovarian cancer and uterine carcinoma are also of interest.
    Visit the Dey Lab.

    513-803-1158
    sk.dey@cchmc.org

    SK Dey, PhD

    Lova Riekert Chair and Professor of Pediatrics, Cancer and Cell Biology

    Director, Division of Reproductive Sciences

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-1158

    Fax: 513-803-1160

    Email: sk.dey@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Prostaglandin-nuclear receptor-angiogenic signaling axis during embryo implantation with special emphasis to cPLA2α-Cox2-PPARδ-Vegf network in the uterus; cytokine-growth factor-homeobox-morphogen signaling axis in implantation involving Lif-Hb-Egf-Hoxa10/Msx1-Ihh/Bmp/Wnt network in the uterus; immunophilin/cochaperone-nuclear signaling in the mouse uterus during implantation involving Fkbp52-PR; ligand-receptor signaling with endocannabinoids during the periimplantation events in mice in the context of anandamide interacting with G-protein coupled receptors, CB1 and CB2; molecular and genetic basis of epithelial ovarian cancer with special reference to prostaglandin-PPAR signaling; miRNA and Cox-2 regulation in uterine biology and cancer; Pten and uterine carcinoma: conditionally gene deleted mouse models

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    Biography

    Dr. Dey received his PhD from The University of Calcutta College of Sciences in 1972, after which he received postdoctoral training at the University of Kansas Medical Center from 1973-1977, followed by his faculty appointment in 1977 where he rose to the rank of University Distinguished Professor. He moved to Vanderbilt University as Dorothy Overall Wells professor of pediatrics, cell and developmental biology and pharmacology in 2002. In both places he directed NIH-funded reproductive biology training grants. In 2008, Dr. Dey moved to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center as Lova Riekert Chair and professor of pediatrics to start a new Division of Reproductive Sciences. He has published over 300 original articles and has been funded by two MERIT Awards, RO1 grants and a Program Project Grants from NIH, and grants from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and March of Dimes Foundation. His research mission has been to define the molecular road map to embryo-uterine interactions during pregnancy. His recent work published in Developmental Cell, Nat Med, PNAS and JCI provides novel information in the context of cell polarity in implantation, ectopic pregnancy, progesterone resistance to pregnancy failure and premature decidual senescence in preterm delivery. In 2008, Dr. Dey received Carl G. Hartman Award, the highest honor of the Society for the Study of Reproduction. In 2009, he received IVI Award sponsored by Schering-Plough for best contribution in Reproductive Medicine.

    He has graduated seven PhD students and mentored over 40 postdoctoral fellows, 20 of whom are currently independent faculty members, and most others are investigators in major research institutions. His laboratory currently consists of one junior faculty, four postdoctoral fellows, one MD/PhD student, and two research assistants.

    Education and Training

    BSc: Presidency College, Calcutta, India, 1965.

    MSc:
    University of Calcutta, India, 1967.

    PhD:
    University of Calcutta, India, 1972.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications

    Faculty

    A photo of Takiko Daikoku.

    Takiko Daikoku, PhD

    uses novel mouse models to study the downstream and upstream signaling pathways critical to the initiation and progression of human endometrial cancer. Genes of specific interest include Pten and p53.
    Visit the Daikoku Lab.

    513-803-2091
    takiko.daikoku@cchmc.org

    Takiko Daikoku, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-2091

    Fax: 513-803-1160

    Email: takiko.daikoku@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Endometrial cancer and ovarian cancer initiation; molecular and genetic clues to embryo-uterine interactions during implantation

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    Education and Training

    PhD: The University of Tokushima/Japan, 2000.

    MS: The University of Tokushima/Japan, 1997.

    BS: The University of Tokushima/Japan, 1995 .

    Publications

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    Grants

    Endocannabinoid Signaling During Early Pregnancy. Co-Investigator. National Institute on Drug Abuse. Feb 1997 - Nov 2012. #R37DA006668.
    A photo of Sanjoy Das.

    Sanjoy K. Das, PhD

    focuses on two independent areas: 1) Characterization of non-genomic actions of natural estrogen and xenoestrogens in the uterus without involving the nuclear ERα and ERβ, and 2) Aspects of uterine cell cycle regulation for decidualization in implantation.
    Visit the Das Lab.

    513-803-1159
    sanjoy.das@cchmc.org

    Sanjoy K. Das, PhD

    Academic Information

    Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-1159

    Fax: 513-803-1160

    Email: sanjoy.das@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Characterization of non-genomic actions of natural estrogen and xenoestrogens in the uterus without involving the nuclear ERa and ERb; aspects of uterine cell cycle regulation for decidualization in implantation

    Visit the Das Lab.

    Education and Training

    PhD: Biochemistry, University of Calcutta, Calcutta, India.

    MSc: Biochemistry, University of Calcutta, Calcutta, India.

    BSc: Chemistry (Honors), University of Calcutta, Calcutta, India.

    Publications

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    A photo of Tony De Falco.

    Tony J. De Falco, PhD

    has basic research programs in gonad differentiation and homeostasis. His lab investigates how the initially undifferentiated gonad primordium transforms into a testis or ovary, as well as how the adult testis maintains sperm production over a long reproductive lifespan. His specific interests are in the novel and diverse roles of myeloid immune cells in reproductive biology.

    Visit the De Falco Lab.

    513-803-3988
    tony.defalco@cchmc.org

    Tony J. De Falco, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-3988

    Email: tony.defalco@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    Differentiation of the fetal gonad into a sexually dimorphic and structurally specialized organ; spermatogonial differentiation; roles of myeloid cells in tissue remodeling, organ vascularization and spermatogonial development.

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    Education and Training

    BA: University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA.

    PhD: Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.

    Postdoc: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC.

    Postdoc: National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, Japan.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications.
    A photo of Satoshi Namekawa.

    Satoshi H. Namekawa, PhD

    examines the mechanisms and evolution of epigenetic events during mammalian reproduction, using a male germ cell model.
    Visit the Namekawa Lab

    513-803-1377
    satoshi.namekawa@cchmc.org

    Satoshi H. Namekawa, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-1377

    Fax: 513-803-1160

    Email: satoshi.namekawa@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    The long-term goal of my research is to understand the mechanisms and evolution of epigenetic events during mammalian reproduction. One of our focus areas is epigenetic regulation of sex chromosomes in germ cell development. Recently, my laboratory demonstrated that DNA damage response pathways trigger epigenetic programming on the sex chromosomes in germ cells. An on-going direction of my laboratory is to pursue a general link between DNA damage response pathways and epigenetic programming. Another goal of my laboratory is to identify novel factors and related pathways that control epigenetic programming during mouse reproduction, especially focusing on the events occurring on sex chromosomes during spermatogenesis as well as the regulatory mechanisms in germline stem cells.

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    Biography

    Dr. Namekawa received his PhD from Tokyo University of Science in 2005. He completed postdoctoral training in the laboratory of Dr. Jeannie T. Lee at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in 2009, followed by his faculty appointment at Cincinnati Children's in 2009. He is funded by NIH R01 Award and the Basil O’Connor Award from March of Dimes Foundation.

    Education and Training

    PhD: Tokyo University of Science, Japan, 2005.

    BS: Tokyo University of Science, Japan, 2000.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications
    A photo of Yuya Ogawa.

    Yuya Ogawa, PhD

    is interested in how non-coding RNAs impact gene regulation and development in animals using X-chromosome inactivation as a model system.

    513-803-1949
    yuya.ogawa@cchmc.org

    Yuya Ogawa, PhD

    Academic Information

    Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

    Phone: 513-803-1949

    Fax: 513-803-1160

    Email: yuya.ogawa@cchmc.org

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    Specialties

    In mammalian females, one of the two X-chromosomes is silenced to correct the imbalance of X-linked gene dosage between males (Xy) and females (XX). This chromosome-wide gene silencing is induced by a long noncoding RNA, Xist RNA.

    Our laboratory is interested in the mechanisms of: (1) how the chromosome-wide silencing is induced by Xist RNA and (2) how the long-range silencing is maintained and organized. Our long-term goal is to understand how noncoding RNAs impact gene regulation and development in animals.

    Education and Training

    PhD: Biology, Osaka University, Japan, 1998.

    MS: Molecular Biology, Nagoya University, Japan, 1994.

    BS: Molecular Biology, Nagoya University, Japan, 1992.

    Publications

    View PubMed Publications