• Research Faculty

  • A photo of SK Dey.

    SK Dey, PhD Lova Riekert Chair and Professor of Pediatrics, Cancer and Cell Biology

    investigates the paracrine, autocrine and juxtacrine signaling networks that influence uterine biology in the context of embryo-uterine interactions during pregnancy. He also works on the effects of endocannabinoids on periimplantation events. Studies involving the molecular and genetic regulation of epithelial ovarian cancer and uterine carcinoma are also of interest.
    Visit the Dey Lab.

    513-803-1158

    A photo of Takiko Daikoku.

    Takiko Daikoku, PhD

    uses novel mouse models to study the downstream and upstream signaling pathways critical to the initiation and progression of human endometrial cancer. Genes of specific interest include Pten and p53.
    Visit the Daikoku Lab.

    513-803-2091

    A photo of Sanjoy Das.

    Sanjoy K. Das, PhD

    focuses on two independent areas: 1) Characterization of non-genomic actions of natural estrogen and xenoestrogens in the uterus without involving the nuclear ERα and ERβ, and 2) Aspects of uterine cell cycle regulation for decidualization in implantation.
    Visit the Das Lab.

    513-803-1159

    A photo of Tony De Falco.

    Tony J. De Falco, PhD

    has basic research programs in gonad differentiation and homeostasis. His lab investigates how the initially undifferentiated gonad primordium transforms into a testis or ovary, as well as how the adult testis maintains sperm production over a long reproductive lifespan. His specific interests are in the novel and diverse roles of myeloid immune cells in reproductive biology.

    Visit the De Falco Lab.

    513-803-3988

    A photo of Satoshi Namekawa.

    Satoshi H. Namekawa, PhD

    examines the mechanisms and evolution of epigenetic events during mammalian reproduction, using a male germ cell model.
    Visit the Namekawa Lab

    513-803-1377

    A photo of Yuya Ogawa.

    Yuya Ogawa, PhD

    is interested in how non-coding RNAs impact gene regulation and development in animals using X-chromosome inactivation as a model system.

    513-803-1949