• Study Aims and Hypotheses

    The CHIP Study seeks to promote childhood literacy and reduce injuries in the homes of young children.  Below are our aims and hypotheses. 

  • To test the efficacy of the installation of multiple, passive measures (e.g., cabinet locks, stairgates, smoke detectors) to reduce exposure to modifiable injury hazards in the homes of young children of first-time mothers and subsequent medically attended injury.

    1: The housing units randomly assigned to the intervention group will have a significant decrease in the number and density (number per area) of residential injury-related hazards compared with control group units. 

    2: Children whose housing units are randomized to the intervention group (e.g., installation of multiple, passive measures to reduce exposure to residential hazards) will have a 50 percent reduction in modifiable and medically attended injuries compared with children in the control group followed for 24 months in intention-to-treat analyses.

    To identify subgroups of mothers and children who benefit most from the intervention by examining potential moderators of maternal depressive symptoms, the intensity of supervisory behavior and child temperament and activity on the intervention and subsequent injury outcomes.  

    1: Persistent maternal depressive symptoms will moderate the effects of the intervention on modifiable childhood injury in the home. 

    2: Less intense maternal supervisory behavior over the course of the intervention follow-up will moderate the effects of the intervention on modifiable childhood injury. 

    3: Children scoring high in activity on the Carey Temperament Scale will experience reduced benefits of the intervention on modifiable childhood injury in the home