Fighting for Our Smallest Babies

Cincinnati Children’s Ranked No. 4 Neonatology Program in U.S.

You can’t wait for the day when you welcome your new baby into the world.

But if that day doesn’t go as planned, we’re here.

We’re a nationally recognized team of neonatal and perinatal doctors, nurses, therapists and other specialists — and your baby is the center of this group. We will explain your child’s condition and answer any questions you have.

You want the very best for your baby, which is why we work with many other Cincinnati Children’s specialists – from cardiology, neurology, hepatology, nephrology, genetics, social services, nutrition and child life just to name a few – to deliver coordinated care.

This approach is why we’ve been ranked the No. 4 neonatology program in the nation by U.S. News & World Report and what enables us to make advances in neonatal medicine, develop new therapies and treat complex conditions in utero.

Understanding and Preventing Preterm Birth, Together

Babies born before 37 weeks can face serious health conditions at birth and are at a higher risk of developing long-term health issues. Our team is committed to understanding what causes preterm birth and what we can do to prevent it in the first place.

We have built strong partnerships in our community to make a difference in the lives of babies, mothers and families:

  • Breakthrough research, coordinated by scientists at Cincinnati Children’s, has identified genetic factors that may indicate an increased risk of preterm birth.
  • Through our partnership with Cradle Cincinnati, we have launched community-based initiatives to build trust, deliver care and better support women during their pregnancies. This work, which began in one local neighborhood, saw a dramatic decrease in preterm births among women living in the area.

Finding Answers, Offering Hope

We’re honored to be one of the top five neonatology programs in the country.

In our Perinatal Institute, we bring together clinical care, research, community programs, and education and training to ask the big questions, find answers and – ultimately – improve outcomes for your child and your family:

  • In addition to Cincinnati Children’s, our neonatologists work at 14 maternity hospital sites across the region sharing their knowledge and caring for preterm and sick babies in local neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), which reduces the need to transport babies to our medical center. 
  • The Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia Center creates images of lungs with MRI – something that was long thought to be impossible – to gain a better understanding of how lungs grow and develop. This knowledge is shaping and improving how we care for babies.
  • The doctors with the Cincinnati Fetal Center are true pioneers in complex and rare fetal conditions. They perform proven treatments on babies before they are even born, so they can be healthier and stronger at birth.
  • We offer specialized delivery programs for moms when babies need upper airway or heart procedures immediately after birth.
  • Our researchers are examining how the preterm brain develops and how imaging may be able to help predict certain neurodevelopmental conditions like cerebral palsy.
  • We’re standardizing feeding procedures to help reduce the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis, a dangerous gastrointestinal emergency babies sometimes develop in the NICU.
  • Our team is constantly seeking to improve communication between families and care teams to help educate families, ease stress and empower parents.
  • Our researchers are leading studies to better understand how we can improve outcomes for babies with twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, neural tube defects and congenital diaphragmatic hernia, including the best timing and approach for clinical interventions.
  • Our developmental biologists are studying organ development and finding ways to apply this knowledge to optimize outcomes for preterm babies.
Neonatology.
U.S. News & World Report scored our Neonatology program 5th in the nation on outcomes & experience; numbers of patients & procedures; key programs, services & staff; professional recognition; quality improvement efforts; and patient support.

 Research.

Education.