Introduction to Solid Foods

The introduction of solid foods usually occurs between 4-6 months of age. Check with your baby's pediatrician for his or her recommendation on when to introduce solid foods to your baby's diet.

General Guide

Introduce one new food at a time. Give for three to four days before introducing another one. In the beginning, use jars of one kind of fruit or vegetable rather than mixed fruits or vegetables.

  • Use the dry form of cereal from the box rather than from the jar.
  • Use single cereals rather than mixed cereals.
  • Begin using rice cereal (rather than barley, oatmeal or corn). Start by using two teaspoonfuls twice a day and slowly increase the quantity up to a maximum of 12 teaspoonfuls.
  • Feed cereal only from a spoon. Never mix cereal in baby's bottle.
  • Feed vegetables only from a spoon. Never mix vegetables in baby's bottle. Use of an infant "feeder" is not recommended because baby won't develop proper feeding skills.
  • Introduce vegetables about two to three weeks after starting cereals.
  • Introduce only one vegetable at a time (again using single vegetable servings before mixed vegetables).
  • Suggested vegetables to begin with are squash, sweet potato, green beans or carrots.
  • Feed fruits only from a spoon. Never mix fruits in baby's bottle. Use of an infant "feeder" is not recommended because baby won't develop proper feeding skills.
  • About two to three weeks after your baby has started vegetables, a single fruit may be added. Start with pears, applesauce, bananas or peaches.
  • A meat and vegetable mix may be used instead of a single vegetable.
  • Begin with chicken or turkey and vegetable, then add other kinds.
  • Do not use dinners. They contain very little meat and much starch.
  • Egg yolks and whites may be introduced at this age.
  • Table foods should be given while the child is sitting at the table with the family.
  • If table food is started too early, the child may not be able to chew it well and might choke.
  • Offer soft bland foods at first. Good choices are mashed potatoes, noodles, rice, soft vegetables.
  • Cut or mash foods into bite-sized pieces appropriate for child's age.

Things to avoid because of choking risk are:

    • Peanuts or nuts
    • Popcorn
    • Whole grapes
    • Hot dogs
    • Raisins

Last Updated 10/2012