Cincinnati Children's News Releases

The Public Relations staff in the Marketing and Communications Department at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center is committed to providing the news media and families with the latest news and highlights about Cincinnati Children's and its efforts to improve children's health.

Recent News Releases

Tuesday, December 16, 2014 - Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Employee Receives National Recognition

Dawne Gardner, MBA, of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and the Comprehensive Children’s Injury Center (CCIC) was named as the Injury Free Coalition for Kids Program Coordinator of the Year.

Wednesday, December 10, 2014 - Study Links ADHD and Conduct Disorder With Increased Alcohol and Tobacco Use in Young Teens

A new study links ADHD and conduct disorder in young adolescents with increased alcohol and tobacco use. The Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center study is among the first to assess such an association in this age group.

Monday, December 01, 2014 - Cincinnati Children’s Studying Impact of Concussions on Teen Drivers

Researchers at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center are currently studying teenagers who have suffered concussions in order to help doctors determine when teen drivers are ready to get back behind the wheel of a vehicle.

Wednesday, November 26, 2014 - Cincinnati Children’s Expert Gives Tips on How to Eat Healthy During the Holidays

Allison Bourgraf, RD, LD, a clinical dietitian in the Division of Nutrition Therapy at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, shares the following tips on how parents and children can enjoy tasty foods during the holiday season and still stay healthy.

Thursday, November 20, 2014 - Researchers Report Way to Target Hard-to-Hit Site in Disease Pathway

Researchers have successfully targeted an important molecular pathway that fuels a variety of cancers and related developmental syndromes called “Rasopathies.” Reporting their results Nov. 20 in Chemistry & Biology, scientists at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center say they identified a class of lead compounds that successfully recognize a key target in the Ras signaling pathway – opening the door to future development of therapies that could make treatments more effective with fewer side effects.