A photo of John S. Hutton.

John S. Hutton, MD, MS


  • Attending Physician, Division of General & Community Pediatrics
  • Director, Reading & Literacy Discovery Center
  • Affiliated Faculty, Every Child Succeeds
  • Assistant Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

About

Biography

Dr. John S. Hutton, MD, MS, is a pediatrician and clinical researcher in the Division of General and Community Pediatrics and Director of the Reading Literacy Discovery Center. His unique reading background includes almost 20 years at the helm of blue manatee children’s bookstore, which in 2019 was converted into Blue Manatee Literacy Project, a 501c3 non-profit providing books and reading experiences to underserved children. He has published 29 children’s books, many with health-promoting themes, including screen time reduction (Baby Unplugged), dialogic reading, reading to babies, infant calming, safe sleep, breastfeeding, ADHD and how the heart works. His books have been adopted in statewide public health campaigns and distributed to millions of families, proceeds benefiting non-profit advocacy groups. He serves as “spokes-doctor” for the Read Aloud 15 MINUTES national campaign and on the national Medical Advisory Board of the Reach Out and Read program.

Dr. Hutton’s research at Cincinnati Children's covers all facets of pediatric general and health literacy. He is applying MRI to better understand the influence of modifiable aspects of home reading and screen environments on structural and functional brain networks supporting emergent literacy, the skills and attitudes preparing a child for reading. His work was the first to document such effects prior to kindergarten, widely featured in national media.

As a pediatrician, Dr. Hutton is also working to validate efficient screening measures of emergent literacy skills and risk factors for clinical use, to guide early interventions and reinforce the concept of reading as a critical aspect of child health and development. Interventions include specially designed mobile health apps and community-based sessions in dialogic reading. He is also actively developing and applying children’s books for a range of pediatric health literacy and advocacy topics, including in clinical trials.

Dr. Hutton is a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha medical honor society, and has received numerous awards for his work, including an Academic Pediatric Association Young Investigator Award, an Arnold W. Strauss Fellow Award and Procter Scholar Award (Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center), and a Healthcare Heroes: Innovator Award (Cincinnati Business Courier). For his children’s books, he has received an Ohioana Cooper Award (Cincinnati/Hamilton County Public Library), a Moonbeam Children’s Book Awards Gold Medal, and a Benjamin Franklin Award Gold Medal (Independent Book Publishers Association).

Publications

Higher access to screens is related to decreased functional connectivity between neural networks associated with basic attention skills and cognitive control in children. Meri, R; Hutton, J; Farah, R; DiFrancesco, M; Gozman, L; Horowitz-Kraus, T. Child Neuropsychology. 2022; 1-20.

Shared reading with infants: SharePR a novel measure of shared reading quality. Hutton, JS; Huang, G; Crosh, C; DeWitt, T; Ittenbach, RF. Pediatric Research. 2022.

Exploratory Mixed-Methods Study of a Primary Care-Based Intervention Promoting Shared Reading During Infancy. Crosh, CC; Barsella, A; Van Slambrouck, L; Notario, PM; Li, Y; Parsons, AA; Hutton, JS. Clinical Pediatrics. 2022; 61:475-484.

Psychometric properties of the ScreenQ for measuring digital media use in Portuguese young children. Monteiro, R; Fernandes, S; Hutton, JS; Huang, G; Ittenbach, RF; Rocha, NB. Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics. 2022.

Inequities in Public Library Branch Access and Children's Book Circulation in a Midwestern American City. Crosh, CC; Hutton, JS; Szumlas, GA; Xu, Y; Beck, AF; Riley, CL. 2022; 6.

Chronic pediatric diseases and risk for reading difficulties: a narrative review with recommendations. Perazzo, D; Moore, R; Kasparian, NA; Rodts, M; Horowitz-Kraus, T; Crosby, L; Turpin, B; Beck, AF; Hutton, J. Pediatric Research. 2022.

Shared Reading and Risk of Social-Emotional Problems. Martin, KJ; Beck, AF; Xu, Y; Szumlas, GA; Hutton, JS; Crosh, CC; Copeland, KA. Pediatrics. 2022; 149.

High screen use by children aged 12-36 months during the first COVID-19 lockdown was associated with parental stress and screen use. Farah, R; Zivan, M; Niv, L; Havron, N; Hutton, J; Horowitz-Kraus, T. Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics. 2021; 110:2808-2809.

Higher maternal education is related to negative functional connectivity between attention system networks and reading-related regions in children with reading difficulties compared to typical readers. Greenwood, P; Dudley, J; Hutton, J; DiFrancesco, M; Farah, R; Horowitz-Kraus, T. Molecular Brain Research. 2021; 1766.

Longer Screen Vs. Reading Time is Related to Greater Functional Connections Between the Salience Network and Executive Functions Regions in Children with Reading Difficulties Vs. Typical Readers. Horowitz-Kraus, T; DiFrancesco, M; Greenwood, P; Scott, E; Vannest, J; Hutton, J; Dudley, J; Altaye, M; Farah, R. Child Psychiatry and Human Development. 2021; 52:681-692.

From the Blog


Book+MRI Scans Help Predict Reading Risks for Preschoolers
Mind Brain Behavior

Book+MRI Scans Help Predict Reading Risks for Preschoolers

John S. Hutton, MD, MS2/4/2021

Tips to Encourage Screen-Free Learning During COVID-19
BlogLearning and Growing

Tips to Encourage Screen-Free Learning During COVID-19

By John S. Hutton, MD7/14/2020

Screen Time Linked to Brain Structure Changes in Young Children
Mind Brain Behavior

Screen Time Linked to Brain Structure Changes in Young Children

John S. Hutton, MD, MS11/4/2019

Study Shows Interactive Reading With Kids May Increase Cognitive Development
BlogResearch and Discoveries

Study Shows Interactive Reading With Kids May Increase Cognitive Development

By John S. Hutton, MD6/13/2017

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