The Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Fellowship at Cincinnati Children’s is a one-year curriculum with an optional second year for up to two fellows depending on the specific goals and progress of the trainee. Applicants must have completed an accredited three-year pediatric hematology / oncology or medical oncology training fellowship in the U.S. or Canada. Equivalent training of qualified applicant’s abroad may be considered if evidence exists there are no barriers to participate (permits to practice, visa restraints, etc.). Applicants must be eligible to obtain an Ohio training certificate / license.

Key Training Program Goals & Objectives

  • To provide formal and organized training, with increasing responsibility, in clinical inpatient and outpatient practice of AYA oncology, including principles of diagnosis and treatment of AYA malignancies, side effects of treatment, survivorship, multidisciplinary team management, and utilization of related supportive care measures
  • To provide closely mentored training in aspects of clinical, translational, and/or basic research in AYA oncology
  • To develop skills and competence with the process of clinical research study development and conduct, academic presentations and publications, federal and private grant submissions and independent research
  • To provide mentoring in the transition to an independent career as an AYA oncologist and clinical / translational investigator

Why Cincinnati Children’s?

Cincinnati Children’s is a national leader in the care of adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer. The Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute (CBDI) at Cincinnati Children’s has one of the nation’s largest volumes of young adult oncology patients as well as established leadership in this field. Patient volume continues to increase with the expansion of the program. The Division of Oncology has established a comprehensive and multidisciplinary AYA oncology program including clinical oncologists with expertise in leukemia and lymphomas along with musculoskeletal, ovarian, testicular and central nervous system tumors that are especially prevalent in the AYA group.

Key programs in fertility, psychology and survivorship with focused attention to young adult issues including education, peer support, physical medicine and rehabilitation, cardiology, endocrinology and physical and occupational therapy are readily available to AYA patients. Multiple Cincinnati Children’s investigators conduct research in AYA oncology including treatment adherence, fertility, survivorship, developmental AYA pharmacology, metabolomics, tumor pathology, exercise and physical activity, drug development, translational and basic science of cancer biology and genomics, and clinical trials with a robust portfolio of studies for which adolescents and young adults are eligible.

Accordingly, Cincinnati Children’s provides an ideal setting for the training of pediatric and medical oncologists who wish to develop expertise in the field of AYA oncology.