Why are we doing this research?

Cincinnati Children’s is conducting a research study, sometimes known as a clinical trial or a clinical study, to look at whether or not videogame-like attention training interventions help children with ADHD. 

Who can participate?

Children 8 to 12 years old with ADHD and/or who have ADHD symptoms may participate. Symptoms may include: short attention span for age, difficulty listening to others, becoming easily distracted, excessive fidgeting and/or talking, or often interrupting others.

What will happen in the study?

The study involves 2 or 3 visits to Cincinnati Children’s during a 2-month period. In order to understand the effects of the videogame-like app, we will ask that you stop giving your child any currently prescribed ADHD medications. Your child’s study doctor will discuss this with you and determine if it is okay for your child to stop taking the medication.

If your child is currently taking medication to treat ADHD and your child’s doctor determines that it is okay to stop taking these medications, then your child will stop taking their medication for a 3 to 7 day washout period. During this time, study staff will be available by phone or you may schedule an additional visit should issues come up or if you have any questions. After the washout period you and your child will have a visit at the Center for ADHD, and if your child is a good fit for the study, your child will stay off medication for the rest of the study (approximately one month). 

Here are some of things that will happen in this study:

  • Your child and you, as the parent or guardian, will have assessments at the beginning and end of the study
  • If he/she is determined to be a good fit for the study, your child will be assigned at random (like a flip of a coin) to use one of two videogame-like iPad apps
  • The study staff will provide the iPad to your child and tell him/her how to use it. You, as the parent or guardian, will be given instructions about your child’s app and have them play the app for 25 minutes a day for 5 days a week at home
  • You and your child will return for a final follow-up visit after about 4 weeks of their playing the videogame-like app at home

Parents or guardians interested in having their child participate will be given a consent form that thoroughly explains all of the details of the study. A member of the study staff will review the study with you and will be sure that all of your questions are answered.

What are the good things that can happen from this research?

We hope that this study treatment will reduce your child’s ADHD symptoms, but we don’t know if it will. When we complete this research, we expect that we will know more about whether or not videogame-like attention training interventions help children with ADHD. This information may help other children with ADHD in the future.

What are the bad things that can happen from this research?

There is a risk that the treatment being tested in this study will not work as well as your child’s current or other standard treatment. Other possible risks and discomforts will be discussed with parents or guardians interested in learning more about the study.

Will you/your child be paid to be in this research study?

Families will receive up to $150 for time and effort, and the ADHD intervention at no charge during the study.

Who should I contact for more information?

Akemi Mii
Study Coordinator
513-803-1343
ADHDappstudy@cchmc.org
Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
3333 Burnet Ave.
Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039

Study Doctor

Jeffery Epstein, PhD
Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

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