Meet the Wells Lab

Mary Bedard.

Mary Bedard

Mary Bedard received her BS from Elon University in 2012 and worked as a senior scientist in the Center of Skin Biology at GlaxoSmithKline. She joined the University of Cincinnati’s MD/PhD program in 2016 and is a Cancer and Cell Biology graduate student in Susanne Wells lab. Her main research is focused on pediatric recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP). The project aims to address the variability of clinical phenotypes and therapeutic responses by defining key components of RRP pathogenesis. Mary is implementing a pipeline of in vitro model systems – consisting of patient samples, derivative primary cells and 3D models – that bridge the gap from bench to bedside and will be used to screen for novel therapeutics.
Mary Bedard.

Mary Bedard

Shannon Cunningham.

Shannon Cunningham

Shannon Cunningham joined the lab as a Laboratory Aide in August of 2018, and she began as a Research Assistant after graduating from Xavier University with her bachelor’s degree in May of 2019. In the laboratory, she focuses on Proton Therapy Research projects led by Mathieu Sertorio. Shannon’s main project compares the effects of 2D and 3D (spheroid) in-vitro model systems on Fanconi Anemia induced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas following radiation and therapeutic drug treatments.
Shannon Cunningham.

Shannon Cunningham

Kaylin Earnest.

Kaylin Earnest

Kaylin earned her PhD degree from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Cincinnati in 2018. Her doctoral research focused on small molecule drug design and development for cancer therapy. She converted the metabolically unstable therapeutic agent A100 into one with potential clinical efficacy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) and Melanoma by redesigning its chemical structure and demonstrating increased stability in vivo. Furthermore, she developed an oligonucleotide aptamer using whole cell-SELEX for the selective targeting of AML cells with the MLL-AF9 fusion. Its efficacy was then validated against primary human leukemia cells.

Kaylin joined the Wells laboratory in November of 2018 to study the metabolic reprogramming of keratinocytes and 3D epidermis during the earliest stages of carcinogenesis, specifically when the oncogene DEK is overexpressed. For these experiments, she uses 3D epidermal organoids and stable isotope resolved metabolomics technologies.

Kaylin Earnest.

Kaylin Earnest

Sarah Haas.

Sarah Haas

Sarah Haas is an undergraduate student from Xavier University who joined the Wells laboratory in January of 2016 as a laboratory aide. Since then, she has been working with a graduate student, Marie Matrka. Sarah's research involves identifying phenotypes caused by Dek over-expression in a novel Dek transgenic mouse model.
Sarah Haas.

Sarah Haas

Shelby McCauley.

Shelby McCauley

Shelby earned her MS degree in Biology from Chatham University in 2018. She joined the laboratory later that year as a Research Assistant. She uses cell culture and murine models to study the specific biological responses that occur following radiation therapy and to investigate combinatory approaches to potentially improve treatment outcomes.
Shelby McCauley.

Shelby McCauley

Taylor Miller.

Taylor Miller

Taylor received her BS in Biology and MS in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology from Wright State University. She joined the Wells laboratory in early 2019 to characterize a novel Dek-overexpressing transgenic mouse model.
Taylor Miller.

Taylor Miller

Bidisha Pal

Bidisha Pal

Bidisha Pal

Bidisha Pal

Sonya Ruiz Torres.

Sonya Ruiz Torres

Sonya obtained her Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Biotechnology from the University of Puerto Rico-Mayagüez (Puerto Rico). She is a Cancer and Cell Biology Graduate Student and joined the Wells Lab in 2014. Her main research focus in generating novel epidermal and hematopoietic models from human induced-pluripotent stem cells of Fanconi Anemia (FA) patients in order to study the role of the FA DNA repair pathway in human development and carcinogenesis as well as the mechanisms underlying the tissue-specific sensitivity to FA pathway malfunction.
Sonya Ruiz Torres.

Sonya Ruiz Torres

Matt Sertorio.

Mathieu Sertorio

Mathieu performed his PhD research at the National Institute of Health and Medical Research in the Division of Immunology and Genetics of Parasitic Diseases, in Marseille, France. While there, he studied the human immune response to schistosomiasis, and genetic susceptibility to severe forms of the disease (liver fibrosis).

In 2012, Mathieu moved to Cincinnati Children’s to explore hematopoietic stem cell and immune deficiencies in the childhood disorder Fanconi anemia disease in the laboratory of Dr. Qishen Pang. His work demonstrated that the deregulation of WNT signaling in Fanconi deficient B cells leads to an impairment of cellular differentiation into plasma cells.

In 2015 Mathieu moved to the laboratory of Dr. Susanne Wells to spearhead basic research studies in the new Proton Therapy Center in collaboration with the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT, Germany, and Dr. Amir Abdollahi). There is a major gap between our sophisticated understanding of proton beam physics in clinical applications and a paucity of data on the molecular, cellular and tissue responses to radiation. The goal of Mathieu’s initiative is to bridge this gap, with the short term goal of leveraging novel transcriptomic and metabolomic profiling data into proton therapy biomarkers and treatment sensitizers.

Matt Sertorio.

Mathieu Sertorio

Kanimozhi Vairamani.

Kanimozhi Vairamani

Kani obtained her PhD degree from the department of Molecular Genetics, University of Cincinnati. The focus of her doctoral research was to understand the physiological functions of bicarbonate transporters in heart using knockout mouse models. She was able to demonstrate that the most abundantly expressed chloride bicarbonate transporter in heart contributes to active transport mediated disposal of CO2.

In 2015, Kani joined the Dauber-Hwa lab at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center to study the genetic etiologies of short stature with particular focus on the GH-IGF1 axis. Using functional studies, she demonstrated that heterozygous mutations in the growth hormone receptor could cause modest short stature through dominant negative effects.

In 2017, she moved to Dr. Susanne wells lab. She is currently working to understand the role of the chromatin associated DEK in esophageal development and tumorigenesis using human induced pluripotent stem cell derived esophageal organoid model.

Kanimozhi Vairamani.

Kanimozhi Vairamani

Join the Lab

We welcome interested students and postdocs to join us in our research. For more information, please contact us.  Contact Us