Jessica A. Kahn, MD, MPH

Associate Chair, Academic Affairs and Career Development

Director, Office of Academic Affairs and Career Development

Academic Affiliations

Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

Phone 513-636-7764

Email lydia.west@cchmc.org

Clinical

Sexual and reproductive health; eating disorders; cancer prevention behaviors in adolescents

 

Research

Interdisciplinary clinical and epidemiologic studies related to prevention of cervical cancer and other diseases caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), in the United States and globally

Visit the Kahn Lab.

 

Jessica A Kahn, MD, MPH, is a professor of pediatrics in the Division of Adolescent and Transition Medicine at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center within the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine in Cincinnati, Ohio. Dr. Kahn serves as the director of the Office of Academic Affairs and Career Development at Cincinnati Children’s. She also serves as the associate program director of the Cincinnati Center for Clinical and Translational Science and Training (CCTST) KL2 program and the Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health (BIRCWH) K12 program at Cincinnati Children's and the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

Dr. Kahn sees patients at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, both at the main hospital site and at Cincinnati Children's Liberty campus. Her clinical interests include sexual and reproductive health and eating disorders. Her research interests include human papillomavirus (HPV) and Pap tests in adolescent girls, HPV vaccines, and cancer prevention behaviors in adolescents.

Dr. Kahn received her undergraduate degree in architecture from Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey in 1986. She received her MD from Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts in 1992 and her MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts in 1999. She was chief resident in pediatrics and a fellow in adolescent medicine at the Children's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, as well as a clinical fellow and instructor at Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Kahn's awards include the Huffman-Capraro Young Investigator Award from the North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology and the New Investigator Award from the Society for Adolescent Medicine. She has received research grants from the National Institutes of Health, the World Health Organization, and foundations such as the American Cancer Society. She has published approximately 140 articles, and is a contributing author for several medical textbooks. She serves on national and international committees and advisory groups focusing on vaccines and other adolescent health issues.

BArch: Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1986.

MD: Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 1992.

MPH: Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 1999.

Residency: Pediatrics, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, 1995; Chief Resident, Pediatrics, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, 1996.

Fellowship: Adolescent Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, 1999.

Certification: American Board of Pediatrics, 1995; American Board of Pediatrics, subspecialist in Adolescent Medicine, 1999.

View PubMed Publications

Kahn JA, Widdice LE, Ding L, Huang B, Brown DR, Franco EL, Bernstein DI. Substantial decline in vaccine-type human papillomavirus (HPV) among vaccinated young women during the first 8 years after HPV vaccine introduction in a community. Clin Infect Dis. 2016;63(10):1281-1287.

Whittemore D, Ding L, Widdice LE, Brown DA, Bernstein DI, Franco EL, Kahn JA. Distribution of vaccine-type human papillomavirus does not differ by race or ethnicity among unvaccinated young women. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2016;25(11):1153-1158.

Mesher D, Soldan K, Lehtinen M, Beddows S, Brisson M, Brotherton JM, Chow EP, Cummings T, Drolet M, Fairley CK, Garland SM, Kahn JA, Kavanagh K, Markowitz L, Pollock KG, Söderlund-Strand A, Sonnenberg P, Tabrizi SN, Tanton C, Unger E, Thomas SL. Population-level effects of human papillomavirus vaccination programs on infections with nonvaccine genotypes. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(10):1732-1740.

Vadaparampil ST, Malo TL, Sutton SK, Ali KN, Kahn JA, Casler A, Salmon D, Walkosz B, Roetzheim RG, Zimet GD, Giuliano AR. Missing the target for routine human papillomavirus vaccination: consistent and strong physician recommendations are lacking for 11- to 12-year-old males. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2016;25(10):1435-1446.

Mullins TL, Zimet G, Lally M, Kahn JA. Adolescent human immunodeficiency virus care providers’ attitudes toward the use of oral pre-exposure prophylaxis in youth. AIDS Patient Care STDS. 2016;30(7):339-348.

Mullins TL, Zimet GD, Rosenthal SL, Morrow C, Ding L, Huang B, Kahn JA. Human papillomavirus vaccine-related risk perceptions and subsequent sexual behaviors and sexually transmitted infections among vaccinated adolescent women. Vaccine. 2016;34(34):4040-4045.

Postenrieder NR, Reed JL, Hesse E, Kahn JA, Ding L, Gaydos CA, Rompalo A, Widdice LE. Rapid antigen testing for trichomoniasis in an emergency department. Pediatrics. 2016;137(6):e20152072.

Kahn JA, Rudy BJ, Xu J, Kapogiannis B, Secord E, Gillison M. Prevalence and risk factors for oral DNA tumor viruses in HIV-infected youth. J Med Virol. 2016;88(11):1944-1952.

Higgins LM, Dirksing KN, Ding L, Morrow CD, Widdice LA, Kahn JA. Adolescents’ intention and self-efficacy to follow Pap testing recommendations after receiving the HPV vaccine. Hum Vaccin Immunother. 2016;12(6):1498-1503.

Kasting ML, Shapiro GK, Rosberger Z, Kahn JA, Zimet GD. Tempest in a teapot: A systematic review of HPV vaccination and risk compensation research. Hum Vaccin Immunother. 2016;12(6):1435-1450.