HONORS

Theresa Alenghat, VMD, PhD, Division of Immunobiology, and Douglas Millay, PhD, Division of Molecular Cardiovascular Biology,
have been named 2015 Pew Scholars in the Biomedical Sciences. This prestigious honor is awarded to approximately 20 young scientists each year by the Pew Charitable Trusts. Each scholar in this year’s class will receive a four-year grant totaling $240,000 to build upon their research.

Robert Frenck Jr, MD, Interim Director and Medical Director, Division of Infectious Diseases,
received the 2014 Elizabeth Spencer Ruppert, MD, FAAP, Outstanding Pediatrician of the Year Award, the highest honor given by the Ohio Chapter of American Academy of Pediatrics. Frenck leads two statewide programs that provided physicians with strategies to improve immunization rates among Ohio’s children and teens.

Bryan Goldstein, MD,
Heart Institute, was named one of 12 National Fellows for the inaugural Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions Emerging Leader Mentorship Program.

Shanna Guilfoyle, PhD,
Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, received the Carolyn S. Schroeder Award for Outstanding Clinical Practice from the Society of Pediatric Psychology. This award recognizes outstanding commitment and significant contributions to pediatric psychology by a full-time provider of direct clinical services.

Kara Shah, MD, PhD,
Director, Division of Dermatology, was one of five experts elected to the National Psoriasis Foundation Medical Board. Shah has been instrumental in building clinical and research programs at Cincinnati Children’s in atopic dermatitis, pigmented lesions, cutaneous lymphoma, genodermatoses and wound care.

Samir Shah, MD, MSCE,
Director, Division of Hospital Medicine, received the 2015 Miller-Sarkin Mentoring Award from the American Pediatric Association (APA). The award recognizes the contributions of an APA member who has provided outstanding mentorship to learners or colleagues, both locally and nationally, and serves as a model to others who aspire to mentor others as they mature.

Lori Stark, PhD, ABPP,
Director, Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, and Arnold Strauss Chair for Mentorship, has won the Award for Outstanding Mentorship from the Society of Pediatric Psychology. Formerly known as the Martin P. Levin Mentorship Award, this honor recognizes faculty in pediatric psychology who mentor students in an exemplary way, providing professional advice and guidance through various training phases.

Jeffrey Whitsett, MD,
Chief, Neonatology, Perinatal and Pulmonary Biology, and Co-Director, Perinatal Institute, received the 2015 Mary Ellen Avery Neonatal Research Award from the American Pediatric Society (APS) and the Society for Pediatric Research (SPR). Whitsett’s pioneering work includes clarifying the roles surfactant proteins play in lung development and leading the way in making surfactant protein replacement a routine treatment for immature lungs and respiratory distress syndrome.

Brenda Wong, MD, MBBS,
Division of Neurology, and Director, Comprehensive Neuromuscular Center, was honored in February, 2015, by CureDuchenne, a national non-profit organization that supports research, for her outstanding leadership in treating boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and her work leading clinical trials of promising therapies.

Thomas Boat, MD,
Retired Dean of the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and Vice President for Health Affairs, received the William Cooper Procter Medallion, the highest honor given by Cincinnati Children’s. The award recognizes a career of contributions since 1993, including serving as Director of the Research Foundation and Physician-in-Chief at Cincinnati Children’s as well as Chairman of the UC Department of Pediatrics. Boat retired in November from his UC roles and rejoined Cincinnati Children’s as part of the Division of Pulmonary Medicine. 
Thomas Boat, MD.
Uma Kotagal, MBBS, MSc,
Senior Vice President, Quality, Safety and Transformation and Executive Director, James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence, received the Daniel Drake Medal, the highest honor given by the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. The medal recognizes her career of outstanding contributions to medical education, scholarship and research. Kotagal was born in Bombay, India. She joined Cincinnati Children’s as a fellow in 1975. After devoting much of her early career to neonatal intensive care, Kotagal became the Anderson Center’s first director and a widely-recognized leader in health services research and system transformation.
 Uma Kotagal, MBBS, MSc.

GRANTS

Theresa Alenghat, VMD, PhD,
Immunobiology, will use a five-year, $1 million grant from the Burroughs Wellcome Foundation to study the epigenomic regulation of host-microbiota interactions in the gastrointestinal tract.

Bruce Aronow, PhD,
Biomedical Informatics, will use a five-year, $1.1 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to study the multimodal analysis of high-risk psychosis mutations in induced neuronal cells.

Steve Danzer, PhD,
Anesthesia, received a five-year, $2 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to study the mTOR regulation of aberrant neuronal integration.

Sudhansu K. Dey, PhD,
Reproductive Sciences, received a five-year, $2.4 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to study “Endocannabinoid Signaling during Early Pregnancy.”

Stuart Goldstein, MD,
Nephrology, will use a three-year, $1.5 million grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to study the “Reduction of Nephrotoxic Medication-Associated Acute Kidney Injury.”

Gang Huang, PhD,
Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, will study the role of “Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1alpha in Myelodysplasia” using a five-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

Xi Jason Jiang, PhD,
Infectious Diseases, will use a five-year, $1.3 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to study the HBGA receptors in host cell entry and infection of norovirus.

Mi-Ok Kim, PhD,
Biostatistics and Epidemiology, will study “Propensity Score-based Methods for Comparative Effectiveness Research using Multilevel Data” with the help of a two-year, $1.1 million grant from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute.

Rohit Kohli, MBBS, MS,
Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, will study the improvement rates of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease following bariatric surgery, using a five-year, $2.4 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

Jeffery Molkentin, PhD,
Molecular Cardiovascular Biology, will examine how “Thrombospondin 4 Regulates Adaptive ER Stress Response” with a three-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

Louis Muglia, MD, PhD,
Perinatal Institute, received a one-year, $2 million grant from the March of Dimes to help establish its Prematurity Research Center Ohio Collaborative, a multi-year research program aimed exclusively at finding the unknown causes of premature birth.

Masato Nakafuku, MD, PhD,
Developmental Biology, will use a five-year, $2.5 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to study the molecular control of neurogenesis in the adult subventricular zone.

Nancy Ratner, PhD,
Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, will study “Brain Dysfunction in Neurofibromatosis” using a five-year, $1.6 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Marc Rothenberg, MD, PhD,
Allergy and Immunobiology, will use a two-year, $2.8 million grant from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to study the “Comparative Efficacy of Therapies for Eosinophilic Esophagitis.”

Patrick Ryan, PhD, MS,
Biostatistics and Epidemiology, will use a two-year $1.6 million grant from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences to study personal exposure to ultra-fine particulate matter and respiratory health.

Rolf Stottmann, PhD,
Human Genetics, will use a four-year, $1.2 million grant from the National Institute of General Medicine Sciences to study a genetic approach to defining the Ttc21b interactome in mammalian ciliopathies.

Nikolai Timchenko, PhD,
Surgery, will pursue “NAFLD: Mechanisms and Treatments” with a $1.2 million, three-year grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.