HONORS

Frank Biro, MD,
Director of Research, Adolescent and Transition Medicine, received the 2015 Cincinnati Pediatric Society’s Founders’ Award, which honors career achievements in basic or clinical research and distinguished contributions to child health. Biro’s career at Cincinnati Children’s spans 31 years. He is nationally recognized for research on pubertal maturation. He was elected to the Cincinnati Children’s Hall of Honor in 2014.

Samantha Brugmann, PhD,
Plastic Surgery, is one of only 105 winners nationwide this year of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. Brugmann was honored for her studies of avian models of human craniofacial development.

Andrew Dauber, MD,
Program Director and Director of Translational Research, Cincinnati Center for Growth Disorders, received the 2015 Young Investigator Award from the European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology, which recognizes outstanding research by society members aged 40 or younger.

Prasad Devarajan, MD, Director, Nephrology and Hypertension,
and Kasper Hoebe, PhD, Immunology,
were listed among Thomson Reuters’ Highly Cited Researchers 2015. This list includes influential researchers in 21 scientific fields who are ranked in the top one percent of the most cited writers within their field.

Anna Esbensen, PhD,
Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, an expert in the lifespan development of individuals with Down syndrome, was named in October 2015 as a fellow of the American Psychological Association.

Robert Frenck Jr., MD, Interim Director, Infectious Diseases,
and Paula Braverman, MD, Director, Community Programs, Adolescent and Transition Medicine,
received the Leonard P. Rome Award from the Ohio Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. They were honored for developing the Teen Immunization Education Sessions Program, which is part of a national effort to increase HPV vaccination rates in teens. The Ohio Department of Health recently committed to re-fund the program through the end of 2016. In another achievement, Frenck was elected, effective Nov. 1, 2015, to the Executive Committee of the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Infectious Diseases.

Patricia Fulkerson, MD, PhD, Allergy and Immunology,
and Ellen Lipstein, MD, MPH, Adolescent and Transition Medicine,
have been selected as 2015 Schmidlapp Women Scholars. Fulkerson’s research focuses on defining the regulatory network that drives eosinophil development. Lipstein’s work focuses on family-centered medical decision making. The Fifth Third Bank/Charlotte R. Schmidlapp Women Scholars Program selects women faculty in a competitive application process and provides funds to support their academic career development.

Satoshi Namekawa, PhD,
Reproductive Sciences, received the 2015 New Investigator Award from the Society for the Study of Reproduction, which recognizes outstanding research by society members who complete and publish within 12 years after earning a doctoral degree.

Shari Wade, PhD,
Director of Research, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, received the inaugural Dr. Jane Gillett Award at the first International Paediatric Brain Injury conference held by the International Paediatric Brain Injury Society and the International Brain Injury Association. The award recognizes outstanding contributions to improving the lives of children impacted by brain injury.

Sing Sing Way, MD, PhD,
Infectious Diseases, was awarded the E. Mead Johnson Award for Pediatric Research, considered among the most prestigious honors in pediatric research, and the inaugural Gale and Ira Drukier Prize in Children’s Health Research from Weill Cornell Medical College.

Gary Webb, MD,
Director, Cincinnati Adolescent and Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program, received the 2015 Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Society for Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ISACHD). In 1980, Webb became Co-Director and then Director of the Toronto Congenital Cardiac Center for Adults, one of the first ACHD centers in the world. He was the founding president of ISACHD and has held leadership roles in numerous ACHD organizations. He has co-authored more than 160 manuscripts and has edited two major textbooks.

 


Cincinnati Children’s Appoints Six Endowed Chairs

 

Cincinnati Children’s honored five faculty members as chairs of the Research Foundation and another faculty member as the new Michael and Suzette Fisher Chair. The awards were presented Sept. 24, 2015, to these distinguished honorees:

Research Foundation Endowed Chairs

Maria Britto, MD, MPH,
Director and Founder, Center for Innovation in Chronic Disease Care
Britto’s research looks to develop and evaluate new methods of care delivery for patients with cystic fibrosis, asthma and sickle cell disease. She serves as president of the Society for Pediatric Research and is a member of the American Board of Pediatrics Research Advisory Committee. She joined Cincinnati Children’s in 1995.

Tracy Glauser, MD,
Associate Director, Cincinnati Children’s Research Foundation
An expert in pediatric neurology, pediatric epilepsy, clinical pharmacology and pharmacogenetics, Glauser serves as Director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center and Co-Director of Genetic Pharmacology Service. He also is vice-chair of the Cincinnati Children’s Institutional Review Board. Glauser has authored or co-authored more than 130 articles and book chapters.

Peter Margolis, MD, PhD,
Director of Research, James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence
A leader in healthcare quality improvement, Margolis is the national chair of the PCORnet Steering Committee, a $100 million initiative of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). He also chairs the Health Services Research Collaborative. Margolis joined Cincinnati Children’s in 2006.

Sander Vinks, PharmD, PhD,
Director, Clinical Pharmacology, and Scientific Director, Pharmacy Research
An expert in therapeutic management and the biochemical and physiological effects of medications, Vinks chairs the Clinical Pharmacology and Translational Research committee of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists and serves on the Board of Regents of the American College of Clinical Pharmacology. He has published more than 140 peer-reviewed manuscripts and 18 book chapters.

Katherine Yutzey, PhD,
Director, Molecular and Developmental Biology Graduate Program
Yutzey studies the regulation of heart development, and is internationally renowned for research on the control of valvulo-septal development. Yutzey was the first recipient of the Fifth Third Bank/Charlotte R. Schmidlapp Women Scholars Award. She holds positions on the American Heart Association National Peer Review Steering Committee and the Student Grievance Committee. She joined Cincinnati Children’s in 1995.

Michael and Suzette Fisher Chair

Stephen Muething, MD,
Vice President for Safety and Associate Director, James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence.
Muething leads Cincinnati Children’s strategic goal of eliminating all serious harm for patients and employees. He serves on multiple national pediatrics safety groups, including Children’s Hospitals’ Solutions for Patient Safety, a network that includes more than 88 pediatric hospitals.

Other New Chairs

These distinguished faculty members also have recently been awarded endowed chairs at Cincinnati Children’s:

Lori Stark, PhD,
Director, Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, was awarded the Arnold Strauss Chair in Mentoring.

Carolyn Kercsmar, MD,
Co-Director, Pulmonary Medicine, was awarded the Luther Foundation Research Chair of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine.

 


GRANTS

 

Artem Barski, PhD,
Allergy and Immunology, will study the direct epigenetic reprogramming of T cells, using a five-year $2.3 million grant from the National Institute of General Medicine Sciences.

Frank Biro, MD,
Director of Research, Adolescent and Transition Medicine, was awarded a one-year, $3.8 million grant from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences to continue his studies on the environmental impact of puberty.

Claire Chougnet, PhD,
Immunobiology, will study the homeostasis and function of regulatory T cells in the aging process, using a two-year, $2 million grant from the National Institute of Aging.

John Clancy, MD,
Pulmonary Medicine, will study the translation of personalized cystic fibrosis research with a four-year, $1.9 million grant from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

Lawrence Dolan, MD,
Endocrinology, will use a five-year, $1.8 million grant from the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to continue his work with the “SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Registry,” a multi-site system for analyzing new cases of diabetes.

Chandrashekhar Gandhi, PhD,
Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, will study the mechanisms of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis with a three-year, $1.3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense.

John Harley, MD, PhD,
Center for Autoimmune Genomics and Etiology, received a four-year, $3.4 million grant from the National Human Genome Research Institute to study the role of genomics in informing policy and improving healthcare outcomes.

Bin Huang, PhD,
Biostatistics and Epidemiology, will study patient-centered adaptive treatment strategies with a three-year, $1.5 million grant from the Patient-Centered Outcome Research Institute, an independent nonprofit, nongovernmental organization based in Washington, DC.

James Heubi, MD,
Director, Center for Clinical and Translational Science and Training, was awarded the Clinical and Translational Science Award, part of a five-year, $2.8 million grant from National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.

Eric Kirkendall, MD, MBI,
Hospital Medicine, received a four-year, $1.5 million grant from the National Library of Medicine to study ways to improve the safety of intensive-care medications.

Qing Richard Lu, PhD,
Scientific Director, Brain Tumor Center, will study the molecular mechanisms of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination with a five-year, $2.4 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Melinda Mahabee-Gittens, MD, MS,
Emergency Medicine, will study intervention strategies to reduce second-hand smoke exposure using a five-year, $2.9 million grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Peter Margolis, MD, PhD,
Director of Research, James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence, received a one-year, $1.4 million grant from ImproveCareNow, Inc., for his work with its improvement collaborative, a team of physicians from numerous institutions who specialize in inflammatory bowel diseases.

Patrick McGann, MD, MS,
Hematology, was awarded a five-year, $1 million grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute to study the therapeutic response and adherence related to hydroxyurea treatment.

Lou Muglia, MD, PhD,
Perinatal Institute, will study maternal temperament, stress and inflammation in preterm birth, with a two-year, $2.2 million grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Marc Rothenberg, MD, PhD,
Allergy and Immunology, will study the genetic and immunological dissection of eosinophilic esophagitis, using a five-year, $2.5 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

Richard Ruddy, MD,
Emergency Medicine, received a four-year, $2.4 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration to continue his work on improving EMS services through the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN).

Bruce Trapnell, MD, MS,
Pulmonary Medicine, received a four-year, $2.7 million grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, for his continued work with the Rare Lung Diseases Consortium, a network of physicians and patients working to accelerate clinical research and improve treatment.

Ronald Waclaw, PhD, MS,
Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, will study signaling pathways that regulate oligodendrocyte development, using a five-year, $1.9 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Kathleen Walsh, MD, MSc,
Director of Patient Safety Research, James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence, received a three-year, $1.4 million grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to study human and systemic factors in medication error and injury.

Yui-Hsi Wang, PhD,
Allergy and Immunology, will use a three-year, $1.6 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense to study interlukin-9-producing mast cell precursors and their impact on food allergies.

Sing Sing Way, MD, PhD,
Infectious Diseases, will study maternal regulatory T cell antigens specificity, using a five-year, $2 million grant from National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

James Wells, PhD,
Endocrinology, received a five-year, $1.2 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to study intestinal organoids as a model system for studying enteric disease.

Hector Wong, MD,
Critical Care Medicine, will study the novel diagnostic and stratification tools for septic shock, using a three-year, $2.3 million grant from the National Institute of General Medicine Sciences.

Yutaka Yoshida, PhD,
Developmental Biology, received a five-year, $1.6 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to study synapse elimination in the central nervous system.

Basilia Zingarelli, MD, PhD,
Critical Care, will study age-dependent mechanisms in metabolic recovery with a four-year, $1.5 million grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences.