Honors

Steven Black, MD
Global Child Health, was recently named editor-in-chief of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Journal.

Daniel Choo, MD,
Director, Otolaryngology, was elected to the Board of Directors for the American Cochlear Implant Alliance, which sponsors research, raises awareness and advocates for improved access to cochlear implants for patients of all ages.

Robert Frenck Jr., MD
Infectious Diseases, received a national award from the American Academy of Pediatrics for his long-time service to the Ohio chapter. 

Victor Garcia, MD
Founding Director, Trauma Services, received the 2017 Health Care Heroes Lifetime Achievement Award from the Cincinnati Business Courier on Feb. 23.

Margaret Hostetter, MD
Chair, UC College of Medicine Department of Pediatrics, and Director, Cincinnati Children’s Research Foundation, received a 2017 Career Woman of Achievement Award from the Greater Cincinnati YWCA.

Alan Jobe, MD, PhD
Director, Perinatal Biology, has received the 2016 Mary Ellen Avery Award from the American Pediatric Society and the Society for Pediatric Research. This lifetime achievement award honors Jobe’s role in building the scientific foundation for global use of surfactant and steroids. Jobe has authored more than 350 peer-reviewed publications. His career includes leading the NICHD Neonatal Research Network and the NICHD Global Network for Women’s and Children’s Health Research.

John Harley, MD, PhD
Director, Center for Autoimmune Genomics and Etiology (CAGE), was named a Master of the American College of Rheumatology. The honor recognizes career-long achievement in advancing rheumatology research and treatment. 

Gurjit (Neeru) Khurana Hershey, MD, PhD,
Director, Asthma Research, was selected Chair of the NIAID’s U19 Asthma and Allergic Diseases Centers Steering Committee.

Jaimie Nathan, MD
Surgical Director, Pancreas Care Center, was honored by the Ohio/Kentucky Chapter of the National Pancreas Foundation for his efforts to expand the research work of the Pancreas Care Center.

Robbins Awarded Procter Medallion

Jeff Robbins

Jeff Robbins, PhD

Jeff Robbins, PhD, Executive Co-Director of the Heart Institute, and Director, Molecular Cardiovascular Biology, has received the William Cooper Procter Medallion—the highest honor bestowed by Cincinnati Children’s.

Robbins has published more than 250 peer-reviewed scientific articles. Known as the “father of cardiac transgenesis,” his work led to the development of reagents that have helped scientists understand the actions of proteins responsible for human cardiac disease and design effective therapies. Robbins’ research advanced our understanding of both normal and disease-causing cardiac proteins. Thousands of other investigators have leveraged his data and reagents to advance their own research. 

The Procter Medallion is the latest of many awards during Robbins’ 45-year career. Others include the Louis and Artur Lucian Award for research in circulatory disease; the Presidential Award from the International Society of Heart Research; and the prestigious Research Achievement Award from the American Heart Association.

Kraft Named President-Elect  of the American Academy  of Pediatrics

Colleen Kraft

Colleen Kraft, MD


Colleen Kraft, MD, Medical Director of The Health Network by Cincinnati Children’s, was selected in November to be President-Elect of the American Academy of Pediatrics. 

Kraft will serve as a spokesperson for 66,000 pediatricians across the U.S. She will be at the helm of the organization’s policy decisions and will be charged with communicating those decisions to pediatricians and to the public.
Kraft says she wants to preserve the personal nature of the provider/patient relationship, which can get lost in a larger healthcare system. “Private practices tend to be more familiar with individual patients’ conditions. That relationship is so undervalued in this country.”

Kraft’s 3-year commitment to the AAP includes serving as president-elect in 2017, as president in 2018 and as past-president in 2019.

Grants

From Oct. 1 through Jan. 31, researchers at Cincinnati Children’s were awarded 169 grants valued at $94 million in total costs. Here are the recipients of grants exceeding $1 million in total costs:

David Bernstein, MD, MA,
Infectious Diseases, received a seven-year, $4.2 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, for his work with the agency’s Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units. The project helps researchers develop new and improved vaccines and therapies against infectious diseases.

Hermine Brunner, MD, MSc
Director, Rheumatology, received a five-year, $1.7 million grant from Pfizer to study the efficacy, safety and tolerability to tofacitinib, as a potential treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The drug is approved to treat adult rheumatoid arthritis. 

James Cnota, MD,
Heart Institute, received a six-year, $2.4 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, for his role in the Pediatric Heart Network Prairieland Consortium, a collaboration between the cardiovascular programs at Cincinnati Children’s and Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis. 

Biplab Dasgupta, PhD, MS,
Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, will study the biguanide sensitivity of glioma stem cells, with a five-year, $1.9 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Robert Frenck, MD,
Medical Director, Infectious Diseases, received a two-year, $1.7 million grant from PATH Vaccine Solutions to study development of a Shigella sonnei human challenge model, using a newly manufactured lyophilized lot of strain 53G that could serve as a challenge strain for all S. sonnei vaccine candidates. Shigella infection is an intestinal disease. 

John Harley, MD, PhD,
Director, Center for Autoimmune Genomics and Etiology (CAGE), received a three-year, $2.6 million grant from the National Human Genome Research Institute for his leadership role in “Better Outcomes for Children: Promoting Excellence in Healthcare Genomics to Inform Policy.” The project is part of the eMERGE collaboration with Boston Children's, which incorporates advances of genetics, genomics and electronic medical recordkeeping.

Michael Helmrath, MD, MS,
Director, Surgical Research, will study the investigation of regional identity in human intestinal stem cells, using a five-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

Gurjit (Neeru) Khurana Hershey, MD, PhD,
Director, Asthma Research, received a seven-year, $5.6 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, for her work with the Children’s Respiratory Research and Environment Workgroup.

Todd Jenkins, PhD, MPH
Surgery, will study longitudinal assessment of teens who have undergone bariatric surgery, using a five-year, $4.7 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. 

Brad Kurowski, MD, MS,
Rehabilitation Medicine, will use a five-year, $3.4 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke, to study the genetic and environmental influences on recovery of severe brain injury.

Richard Lang, PhD,
Ophthalmology, received a five-year, $2.4 million grant from the National Eye Institute, to study the regulation of vascular development in the eye by an opsin 5-dependent clock.

Ian Lewkowich, PhD,
Immunobiology, will study the mechanisms of IL-17A-mediated enhancement of asthma severity, using a three-year, $1.7 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

Jeffery Molkentin, PhD
Molecular Cardiovascular Biology, will study the paracrine hypothesis underlying cardiac stem cell therapies, with a four-year, $1.6 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. He also received a five-year, $1.1 million grant from the same agency for research into targeting mitochondria to treat heart disease. 

Takahisa Nakamura, PhD,
Endocrinology, received a five-year, $1.9 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, to study the role of hepatic RNA silencing in insulin resistance.

Nehal Parikh DO, MS,
Perinatal Institute, received two grants from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. He will study early prediction of cerebral palsy in premature infants using a five-year, $4.3 million grant, and will use a five-year, $2.2 million award to explore a new model to identify preterm newborns at high-risk for cognitive deficits.

Anne Karina Perl, PhD, MS,
Neonatology and Pulmonary Biology, received a three-year, $2 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, to study the interstitial resident fibroblasts direct alveolar epithelial differentiation. The goal is to better understand the mechanisms of development, normal lung repair, and lung disease.

Samir Shah, MD, MSCE,
Director, Hospital Medicine, will study strategies to improve post-discharge outcomes for patients and their families, using a three-year, $2.2 million grant from the Patient-Centered Outcome Research Institute.

Jennifer D. Smith, PsyD
Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, received a five-year, $2.8 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration, for her role with the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities program.

Mary Allen Staat, MD, MPH,
Infectious Diseases, will study enhanced surveillance strategies for new vaccine-preventable diseases, using a one-year, $2 million grant from the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Dan Starczynowski, PhD,
Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, received a six-year, $6.4 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, for his work in decoding the innate immune signaling in normal and myelodysplastic hematopoiesis.

Takanori Takebe, MD,
Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, received a four-year, $1.5 million grant from the New York Stem Cell Foundation, to study the clinical translation of organ bud transplant therapy.

Katherine Yutzey, PhD,
Molecular Cardiovascular Biology, received a four-year, $1.7 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, to study the regulatory mechanisms of adult cardiomyocyte proliferation.