GRANTS

From June 1 through Sept. 30, researchers at Cincinnati Children’s were awarded 193 grants totaling $130.2 million. Here are the recipients of grants of $1 million or more:

Stephen Becker, PhD,
Behavioral Medicine & Clinical Psychology, received a four-year, $1.4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education to examine sluggish cognitive tempo and its impact on education.

Burns Blaxall, PhD,
Molecular Cardiovascular Biology, received a four-year, $2 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to study targeting pathologic G-protein signaling. 

Samantha Brugmann, PhD,
Plastic Surgery, will study the role of primary cilia in murine craniofacial development, using a three-year, $2 million grant from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research.

Kristen Copeland, MD
General and Community Pediatrics, was awarded a five-year, $1.9 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration for her work with its fellowship program.

Tony De Falco, PhD
Reproductive Sciences, received a five-year, $2 million grant from the National Institute of General Medicine Sciences, to study macrophage regulation of the spermatogonial stem cell niche.

Sudhansu K. Dey, PhD,
Director, Reproductive Sciences, received a five-year, $2.1 million grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, to study the molecular signaling in uterine receptivity to implantation.

Jeffery Epstein, PhD,
Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, will use a four-year, $1.6 million grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to explore ways to improve ADHD behavioral treatment. 
 
Craig Erickson, MD
Child and Adolescent Psychology, received a three-year, $1.5 million grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, to study the mechanisms of neocortical and sensory hyperexcitability.

Donald Gilbert, MD, MS,
Neurology, will study GABAergic sensorimotor dysfunction in Tourette syndrome, using a five-year, $1.2 million grant from the Kennedy Krieger Institute, which focuses on disorders of the brain, spinal cord and musculoskeletal system.
  
H. Leighton Grimes, PhD,
Immunobiology, received a three-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Cancer Institute, to study a rapid spontaneous murine model of cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia.

John Harley, MD, PhD,
Director, Center for Autoimmune Genomics and Etiology (CAGE), will study the genetic linkage of lupus, using a five-year, $2 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. 

Gurjit Khurana Hershey, MD, PhD
Director, Asthma Research, received a five-year, $7 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infection Diseases, to study the epithelial genes in allergic inflammation.

Tzipi Horowitz-Kraus, PhD
Program Director, Reading and Literacy Discovery Center, will study the role of executive functions in reading, with a five-year, $2.6 million grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Stacey Huppert, PhD,
Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, will study the building of a functional biliary system from hepatocytes, using a five-year, $2.7 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. 

Thomas Inge, MD, PhD,
Director, Center for Bariatric Research and Innovation, received a five-year, $7.9 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, to examine the limited competition for the continuation of TeenLABS clinical centers. TeenLABS stands for Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery, a multi-center collaboration focused on the safety and health effects of weight-loss surgery. 

Tatiana Kalin, MD, PhD,
Neonatology and Pulmonary Biology, will study targeting of the Foxm1 gene in pulmonary fibrosis, using a four-year, $1.5 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.   

Leah Kottyan, PhD,
Center for Autoimmune Genomics and Etiology (CAGE), will study the mechanisms of genetic risk at chromosome 2p23 in the chronic immune disease eosinophilic esophagitis, using a five-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. 

Brad Kurowski, MD, MS,
Rehabilitation Medicine, will study the genetic and environmental influences on recovery from severe brain injury, using a five-year, $3.3 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Sonata Jodele, MD,
Bone Marrow Transplant and Immune Deficiency, received a one-year, $1.1 million award from Novartis Pharmaceuticals for a randomized study to evaluate the antibody LFG316 in patients who develop transplant-associated microangiopathy after hematopoietic precursor cell transplantation. 

Qing Richard Lu, PhD,
Scientific Director, Brain Tumor Center, received a four-year, $1.1 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, to study the molecular and signaling mechanisms of peripheral nerve sheath tumorigenesis.

Peter Margolis, MD, PhD
Director of Research, James M. Anderson Center for Health System Excellence, was awarded a two-year, $1.5 million grant from the Patient-Centered Outcome Research Institute for his work with ImproveCareNow. Margolis also received a five-year, $4.7 million award from the Patient-Centered Outcome Research Institute to study the impact of anti-TNF monotherapy and combination therapy.

Jeffery Molkentin, PhD,
Molecular Cardiovascular Biology, will study the molecular examination of mitochondrial calcium control, using a four-year, $3.1 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

Greg Myer, PhD
Director of Research, Sports Medicine, will study the real-time sensorimotor feedback for injury prevention, using a five-year, $3.2 million grant from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.

Marsha Polk, HPT, OCPS,
Drug and Poison Information Center, was awarded a five-year, $2 million grant from the Department of Health and Human Services for her work with its Communities Addressing Childhood Trauma program. 

Joseph Qualls, PhD
Division of Infectious Diseases, will study L-citrulline and anti-tuberculosis host defense, using a five-year, $2 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

Richard Ruddy, MD,
Emergency Medicine, will study pediatric emergency care using a four-year, $2.6 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration.

Senthilkumar Sadhasivam, MD, MPH,
Anesthesia, will study the pharmacogenetics of oxycodone, with a five-year, $2.7 million grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Mary Allen Staat, MD, MPH
Infectious Diseases, received a five-year, $6.6 million grant from the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to study enhanced surveillance for new vaccine-preventable disease. The grant is funded through the Prevention and Public Health Fund of the Affordable Care Act.

Susan Thompson, PhD,
Center for Autoimmune Genomics and Etiology (CAGE), received a five-year, $3.9 million grant from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, for her work with the Cincinnati Rheumatic Diseases Resource Center.

Bruce Trapnell, MD, MS
Pulmonary Medicine, received a four-year, $1.6 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to study pathogenesis-based diagnostics and pharmacotherapeutics.

Alexander Vinks, PhD, PharmD,   
Director, Clinical Pharmacology, received a five-year, $1 million grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development for his work with the Cincinnati Pediatric Clinical Pharmacology Postdoctoral Training Program.

Timothy Weaver, PhD, MS,  
Co-Director, Pulmonary Biology, will study the deficiency of phospholipid transfer protein, using a four-year, $2 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

Jeffrey Whitsett, MD
Co-Director, Perinatal Institute, received a seven-year, $8.3 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, to study the editing of alveolar progenitor cells for correction of monogenic disease.

Jianqiang Wu, MD, MS
Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, received a five-year, $1.7 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, to study the miR-155 and RUNX function in neurofibroma tumorigenesis. 

Yi Zheng, PhD
Director, Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, received a four-year, $1.6 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to study blood stem-cell aging and biomarkers.


HONORS
Katherine Auger, MD, MSc
Hospital Medicine, received the 2016 Nemours Child Health Services Research Award., which  recognizes emerging scholars in the field. Auger studies pediatric readmission issues, and is the only pediatrician serving on the National Quality Forum’s expert readmissions committee.

Andrew Beck, MD, MPH
Hospital Medicine, was listed in the Cincinnati Business Courier’s 40 Under 40 Class of 2016.  The honor recognizes young professionals who have reached major career milestones and have made significant contributions to the community.  

Daniel Choo, MD
Director, Otolaryngology, was elected to the Board of Directors for the American Cochlear Implant Alliance, a not-for-profit organization that sponsors research, raises awareness and advocates for improved access to cochlear implants.

Theresa Frey, MD
Fellow, Pediatric Emergency Medicine, received the 2016 Ken Graff Young Investigator Award from the Section on Emergency Medicine of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Michael Gittelman, MD
Emergency Medicine, received a special achievement award from the Ohio Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (Ohio AAP) for his outstanding work on the chapter’s Operations Pillar. Gittelman is president-elect of the chapter. 

Maurizio Macaluso, MD, DPH
Director, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, was elected in September 2016 to the Board of Directors for the American College of Epidemiology.

Kimberly Risma, MD, PHD
Allergy and Immunology, received the 2017 Distinguished Service Award from the American Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology. Risma was honored for her leadership with the Chrysalis Project, a program for medical students and residents that helps them explore careers in allergy and immunology. 

Erin Shaughnessy, MD, 
Hospital Medicine, was recently appointed to the editorial board of Hospital Pediatrics.

Keith Strauss, MSc, 
Radiology, received the Marvin M.D. Williams Award from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). Strauss, a clinical imaging physicist, was recognized for his eminent career in applying the principles of medical physics to improving patient care. Strauss is only the 29th physicist to receive the award in the AAPM’s 59-year history.

Cincinnati Children’s, was listed among the nation’s 100 “Most Wired” hospitals of 2016 in the July 2016 issue of Hospitals & Health Networks. This is the fifth straight year Cincinnati Children’s has received this honor. 

The ImproveCareNow Network, a collaborative group co-founded by Cincinnati Children’s to improve outcomes in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, was selected from 495 applicants to receive the 2016 Drucker Prize from Claremont Graduate University. The prize honors non-profit organizations that show leadership in innovation. Peter Margolis, MD, PhD, Co-Director, Anderson Center, serves as the network’s Executive Scientific Director.

Way Named an HHMI Faculty Scholar, receives NIH Pioneer Award

Groundbreaking research into how the immune system works in early newborn development has led to Sing Sing Way, MD, PhD, being named a Faculty Scholar by The Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Simons Foundation and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Way, an investigator in the Division of Infectious Diseases, studies how genetically foreign maternal and fetal tissues coexist during pregnancy. Understanding how the immune system works in unique developmental contexts could lead to new therapies for improving pregnancy. Way is one of 84 Faculty Scholars selected from 43 institutions. 

Way also is one of 12 recipients of the 2016 NIH Director’s Pioneer Award, which supports scientists of exceptional creativity who propose transforming research approaches to major biomedical challenges. 

As part of this honor, Way will use a five-year, $5.5 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infection Diseases, to study how immunological identity is redefined by genetically foreign microchimeric cells.

Faculty Honored with Research & Endowed Chairs

Several leading faculty members at Cincinnati Children’s were recently honored with new research and endowed chairs to support their ongoing work.

Research Foundation Chairs
Margaret Hostetter, MD, Physician-in-Chief, Chair of Pediatrics and Director, Cincinnati Children’s Research Foundation, announced the recipients of three new CCRF chairs: 
Evaline Alessandrini, MD, MSCE
Javier Gonzalez del Rey, MD, MEd
Thomas Kimball, MD

Endowed Scholars 
Three emerging leaders in their fields became the first to be selected for the Research Foundation’s new Endowed Scholars Program. Each recipient will receive three years of flexible research support. The honorees are: 
Samantha Brugmann, PhD
Yutaka Yoshida, PhD
Avani Modi, PhD

Endowed Chairs
Stuart Goldstein, MD, is the first recipient of the Clark West Endowed Chair. Goldstein is Director of the Center for Acute Care Nephrology; Medical Director of Pheresis Service; Medical Director, Dialysis; and Co-Medical Director of the Heart Institute Research Core. The new chair is named for the physician and researcher who founded the specialty of pediatric nephrology at Cincinnati Children’s in 1953. West went on to head the division for 40 years.

Jeff Robbins, PhD, Executive Co-Director, Heart Institute, received the inaugural Berenfield Family Endowed Chair of Molecular Cardiovascular Biology. Len Berenfield, a long-time supporter of Cincinnati Children’s, established the chair in honor of his mother and of family members born with heart complications. Robbins studies the cause-and-effect relationships between mutations in proteins and their connection to heart disease. 

Marc Rothenberg, MD, PhD, Director, Division of Allergy and Immunology, became the first recipient of the Denise and Dave Bunning Chair for Allergy and Immunology. The Bunning family has supported Rothenberg’s work and the Division of Allergy and Immunology for nearly 10 years. The family’s generosity has helped Rothenberg and colleagues make important strides in diagnosing, understanding and treating eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases (EGIDs).