Honors

Katherine Auger, MD, MSc
Hospital Medicine, received the 2017 Outstanding Research Award during Pediatric Hospital Medicine 2017 in Nashville, an annual meeting sponsored by the Society of Hospital Medicine, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Academic Pediatric Association.

Ray Bignall, MD
Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, received the William Cotton Pediatrician Advocate Award from the Ohio Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. His advocacy work includes creating the “#100Words Project,” which collects and shares stories from pediatric patients, parents and child health professionals.

Patrick Brady, MD, MSc
 
Hospital Medicine, received the 2017 Quality and Patient Safety Award during Pediatric Hospital Medicine 2017 in Nashville.

Jose Cancelas, MD, PhD 
Deputy Director of the Hoxworth Blood Center and stem cell group leader at the Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, was selected as a 2017 inductee to the National Blood Foundation Hall of Fame.

Alvin Crawford, MD 
Professor Emeritus, and Founding Director of the Crawford Spine Center, received the Pioneer Award from the National Medical Fellowships organization, a nonprofit dedicated to increasing the number of underrepresented minority physicians and other professionals in health care.

Alexei Grom, MD, Research Director, Rheumatology,
Grant Schulert, MD, PhD, Rheumatology,
and Sherry Thornton, PhD, Rheumatology 
received the Gold Medal Suzanne Dehoche Prize from Kourir, a French organization for parents of children with JIA, at the European Pediatric Rheumatology Congress, in recognition of their work on discoveries that presage new treatments for JIA.

Donald Gilbert, MD, MS
Neurology, was elected to the Board of Directors of the Child Neurology Society.

Ann Kummer, PhD
Speech-Language Pathology, received a 2017 Honors of the Association award from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). The group’s highest honor recognizes her distinguished contributions to the field of communication sciences and disorders. Her achievements include several leadership positions within ASHA, developing a patented listening device, numerous peer-reviewed articles, 22 book chapters, and the textbook, “Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies.”

Tesfaye Mersha, PhD 
Asthma Research, received the 2017 African Professionals Network Business and Professional Achievement Award in October for his distinguished research and professional contributions to pediatric genomics.

Daniel Starczynowski, PhD
Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, was inducted into the 2017 class of the Cincinnati Business Courier’s “Forty Under 40.” 

Boat Honored with Howland Award from American Pediatric Society
Thomas Boat, MD, Pulmonary Medicine, has been awarded the 2018 John Howland Award, the highest honor bestowed by the American Pediatric Society. The award honors leaders in academic pediatrics whose significant contributions have advanced the lives of children and the profession of pediatrics through clinical care, scientific discovery, mentorship and service. 

Boat graduated from the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in 1966, where he also recently received a Distinguished Alumni Award. His long career began with years of pulmonary clinical care and cystic fibrosis research that led him to the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. 

He advanced to chair the Department of Pediatrics there. In 1993, he moved to Cincinnati where he became Chair of Pediatrics, Director of the Research Foundation, and Physician-In-Chief as Cincinnati Children’s. He recently resigned from roles as Dean of the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and as chief executive officer of University of Cincinnati Physicians. 

Takebe Receives High Honor from Japan 
Takanori Takebe, MD, Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, received the inaugural Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED) Chairperson Prize. The award, bestowed by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, recognizes Takebe’s leadership in developing innovative methods to produce liver buds from human iPS cells.  In addition to his post at Cincinnati Children’s, Takebe is an associate professor with the Department of Regenerative Medicine at Yokohama City University.

Ware’s Research in Africa Selected Among Blood’s Top 10
Russell Ware, MD, PhD, Director, Division of Hematology, received a high honor from the editors of Blood, the journal of the American Society of Hematology, for his role as a senior author of this paper: Novel Use Of Hydroxyurea in an African Region With Malaria (NOHARM): a Trial for Children With Sickle Cell Anemia. The paper was selected as one of the journal’s 10 most outstanding manuscripts of the year from more than 1,000 articles published by the journal in 2017.

Grants

From July 1 through Sept. 30, researchers at Cincinnati Children’s were awarded 164 grants valued at $118.4 million in total costs. Here are the recipients of grants of $1 million or more in total costs:


Matthew Alder, MD, PhD
Critical Care, will study the role of the glycoprotein olfactomedin 4 in septic shock, using a four-year, $1 million grant from the National Institute of General Medicine Sciences.

David Bernstein, MD, MA 
Infectious Diseases, received a three-year, $5.6 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for his role with the continued development of  vaccine and treatment evaluation units, an agency program for which Cincinnati Children’s is one of nine member hospitals.

Jorge A. Bezerra, MD
Director, Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, received a five-year, $1.2 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, for his role in the Digestive Health Center’s Bench to Bedside Research in Pediatric Digestive Disease program.

Samantha Brugmann, PhD
Plastic Surgery, received an eight-year, $8 million grant from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, to study the therapeutic potential of neural crest cells, which are formed from the embryonic ectoderm cell layer during fetal development.

Prasad Devarajan, MD
Director, Nephrology and Hypertension, will explore critical translational studies in pediatric nephrology, using a five-year, $1.2 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

Judith Dexheimer, PhD 
Emergency Medicine, received a four-year, $1.5 million grant from the National Library of Medicine, for her work on the project “Personal Health Record for Youth Emancipating from Foster Care.”

Robert Frenck, MD
Infectious Diseases, received a one-year, $2.9 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, for his work with the vaccine and treatment evaluation units program. He also received a two-year, $1 million grant from PATH Vaccine Solutions for a Phase 1 study on the safety and immunogenicity of live-attenuated universal flu vaccine followed by an inactivated version.

Christina Gross, PhD
Neurology, received a four-year, $1.9 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke, to study MicroRNA-mediated silencing of the Kv4.2 complex in epilepsy.

Margaret Hostetter, MD
Director, Cincinnati Children’s Research Foundation, received a five-year, $7.2 million grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, for her work with the Pediatric Scientist Development Program.

Rulang Jiang, PhD
Developmental Biology, received a five-year, $3.2 million grant from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, to study the development of the mandible, or lower jaw.  

Helen Jones, PhD 
General and Thoracic Surgery, will study placental-specific therapy for fetal growth restriction, with a five-year, $1.9 million grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Jane Khoury, PhD 
Biostatistics and Epidemiology, received a five-year, $3.5 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, to study the level and timing of diabetic hyperglycemia in utero.

Xinhua Lin, PhD 
Developmental Biology, received a four-year, $1.2 million grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, to study the molecular mechanisms regulating intestinal stem cell activities and homeostasis.

Qing Richard Lu, PhD
Scientific Director, Brain Tumor Center, will study chromatin remodeling control of myelination and remyelin, an insulating layer that surrounds the axon of some nerve cells, with a five-year, $2.2 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. 

Satish Madala, PhD
Pulmonary Medicine, will study the therapeutic benefit of Hsp90 inhibition in pulmonary fibrosis, using a three-year, $1.8 million grant from the Department of Defense.

Peter Margolis, MD, PhD
Co-Director, James M. Anderson Center for Health System Excellence, received a two-year, $1.6 million grant from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute for his work with the Pilot Learning Health System.

Jeffery Molkentin, PhD
 
Molecular Cardiovascular Biology, received a five-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, to study the mechanisms of cardiovascular disease.  

Louis Muglia, MD, PhD
Co-Director, Perinatal Institute, received a one-year, $2.6 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, to analyze the potential use of selenium supplementation, and possibly other micronutrients, to prevent preterm birth.

James Mulloy, PhD
Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, will study leukemia stem cell polarity and differentiation therapy, using a five-year, $2.4 million grant from the National Cancer Institute. 

Ertugrul Ozbudak, PhD 
Developmental Biology, received a four-year, $1.2 million grant from the National Institute of General Medicine Sciences, to examine elucidating the mechanism of precision in vertebral segmentation during embryonic development.

Qishen Pang, PhD 
Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, received a four-year, $1.5 million grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, to study the FA DDR pathway in germline integrity that is vital for fertility and the health of offspring.

Nancy Ratner, PhD
Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, will study the mitogenic activities in neurofibromatosis, a genetic disorder that causes tumors to form on nerve tissue, using a five-year, $2.2 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke.

Richard Ruddy, MD
Emergency Medicine, received a four-year, $2.7 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration for his role with the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) project.

Lisa Shook, MA, MCHES
Hematology, received a four-year, $2.1 million grant from the Health Resources & Services Administration, to study sickle cell treatment and outcomes research in the Midwest.

Paul Spearman, MD
Director, Infectious Diseases, received a two-year, $2.9 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, for his role in improving protocols for the continued development of vaccine and treatment evaluation units. The agency also awarded him a two-year, $1.2 million grant to study mucosal protection against HIV generated by PIV5 priming.

Daniel Starczynowski, PhD
Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, received a four-year, $2 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, to study targeting IRAK1 as a therapeutic approach for myelodysplastic syndromes, a group of blood disorders and precursor to leukemia.

Laura Walkup, PhD

Pulmonary Medicine, received a two-year, $1 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, to study early detection of regional bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, an irreversible and obstructive lung condition, in bone marrow transplant patients using ultra-short echo time in methods for magnetic resonance imaging.

Russell Ware, MD, PhD 
Director, Hematology, received a five-year, $3.5 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, for his role with the Phase I/II pilot study “Realizing Effectiveness Across Continents with Hydroxyurea (REACH)” in the treatment of children with sickle cell anemia.

Joshua Waxman, PhD
Molecular Cardiovascular Biology, received a four-year, $1.6 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, to study the molecular mechanisms of atrial development and regeneration.

Jeffrey Whitsett, MD
Co-Director, Perinatal Institute, will study lung and cardiovascular development and disease pathogens, using a five-year, $1.3 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. 

Jason Woods, PhD
Director, Center for Pulmonary Imaging Research, received a three-year, $1.3 million grant from Polarean Inc., for his role in a Phase III trial on HP 129Xe magnetic resonance imaging as a functional pulmonary biomarker in pediatric lung disease.

Aaron Zorn, PhD
Developmental Biology, will study the developmental mechanisms of trachea-esophageal birth defects, using a five-year, $2.2 million grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.