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1978
Dr. William Schubert

Dr. William Schubert made an indelible imprint on Cincinnati Children’s as a pediatrician, researcher and leader.

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1978

Cure

Cincinnati Children’s researchers William Schubert, MD, and John Partin, MD, identify the unique morphological symptoms of Reye’s syndrome, a rare but deadly disease that can damage the liver and brain. Reye’s syndrome usually occurs in children who’ve recently had a viral infection such as chickenpox or the flu; taking aspirin to treat the illness greatly increases the risk of getting Reye’s.

The more health risks that are uncovered, the more kids can freely blossom.

Video still from interview with Dr. William Shubert.

Known as “the grand statesman of pediatrics,” Dr. William Shubert held nearly every major leadership position at the medical center, including president and CEO. When he retired in 1996, he continued to serve on the board of trustees. In 1991, he is was interviewed for the hospital’s oral history project. Watch the video.

1973
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1973

Community

Five organizations — the Adolescent Clinic, the Dental Clinic, the Convalescent Hospital, the Cincinnati Center for Developmental Disorders and United Cerebral Palsy — consolidate with Cincinnati Children’s to form the Children’s Hospital Medical Center, a single destination for families to access comprehensive medical and psychosocial services for their children. Integrated health cares for the whole patient, so kids can be sound in mind and body.

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Community

Cincinnati Children’s leadership agrees to become the area’s only pediatric hospital, thus accepting the responsibility of caring for all children, regardless of the family’s ability to pay. Previously, most unpaid cases had gone to General Hospital (now University Hospital). Care that leaves no patient behind means all kids can get the care they need.

1972
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1972

Care

Marilyn Gaston, MD, creates the sickle cell disease program at Cincinnati Children’s. She would go on to become an assistant surgeon general and rear admiral in the U.S. Public Health Service, and her research would lead to nationwide newborn screening that has helped reduce sickle cell-related deaths significantly. We fight genetic disorders so that all groups and their kids can change the odds.

Dr. Marilyn Gaston

Through her research in the early detection and treatment of sickle cell disease, Marilyn Gaston, MD (right), helped dramatically reduce the impact of a disease that disproportionately affects African Americans. Though the risk is now much reduced, the disease still occurs in one out of every 365 African-American children.