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1960
Sabin Sunday Line

On April 24, 1960 — a day known as “Sabin Sunday,” — 186,000 residents of Cincinnati and Hamilton County received Dr. Albert Sabin’s oral polio vaccine on a cube of sugar.

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1960

Cure

Cincinnati Children’s researcher Albert Sabin, MD, develops the oral polio vaccine. Worldwide adoption of the vaccine nearly eliminates the crippling disease. Today it is estimated that 17 million people are walking that otherwise would have been paralyzed.

When science makes great strides, kids can run and play.

Dr Sabin is congratulated by President Ronald Regan.

Albert Sabin, MD, received recognition from Presidents Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan (pictured here) for his work on the live-virus oral polio vaccine.

In 1987 Dr. Sabin was interviewed for the Medical Heritage Video Series where he looks back on his work in polio and other diseases. Watch the video.

Photo of Joseph Rauh, MD.
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Care

In 1960, Joseph Rauh, MD, became director of Adolescent Medicine, a new division at Cincinnati Children’s and established a clinic at the General Hospital (now UC Health), which was one of only five such clinics in the country. The clinic moved to Cincinnati Children’s in 1973, and a 24-bed adolescent inpatient unit opened in February 1972, greatly expanding beds for teenage patients. Care that’s designed for specific age groups means kids can feel more invested in their treatment plan

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Helen Berry, MS, in her laboratory.

Helen Berry, MS, in her laboratory.

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Helen Berry, MS, helped develop a test to detect Phenylketonuria (PKU), a genetic condition in newborns. She did pioneering research on the genetic inability to metabolize an amino acid in protein, which causes severe mental retardation if untreated. She spent years developing a dietary supplement that made it possible for patients with PKU to eat a less restrictive diet, the first major improvement in treatment of PKU in 30 years.We lead the way in care and research so kids can have the brightest futures.

1962
Fred Silverman, MD (center), shown here with Corning Benton, MD, circa 1950, read a patient’s X-ray.

Fred Silverman, MD (center), shown here with Corning Benton, MD, circa 1950, read a patient’s X-ray.

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1962

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Frederic Silverman, MD, (director of Radiology from 1947-1975) pioneered the use of diagnostic radiology to identify child abuse. His landmark paper, “The Battered Child Syndrome,” co-authored with C. Henry Kempe, appeared in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) in 1962, but it took nearly 20 years for physicians to openly acknowledge the reality of child abuse, and even longer for many hospitals to develop protocols and to hire physicians, nurses, and social workers who were willing to deal with this emerging problem. We look and listen with open minds and hearts, so kids can tell us their stories and be safe.

 

1965
Lester Martin’s innovation and skill as a surgeon resulted in greatly improved outcomes for complicated gastrointestinal surgery, including surgery for Hirschsprung disease and ulcerative colitis.

(Facing camera) Lester Martin’s innovation and skill as a surgeon resulted in greatly improved outcomes for complicated gastrointestinal surgery, including surgery for Hirschsprung disease and ulcerative colitis.

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1965

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In 1965, pediatric surgeon Lester Martin, MD, performed the first operation kidney transplant in the state of Ohio at Cincinnati Children’s. The first pediatric surgeon in Cincinnati, he also performed the first liver transplant at Cincinnati Children’s. When you have bold goals, kids can overcome any obstacles.