Current Projects

Electronic adherence monitoring devices are the most objective and preferred method of measuring medication adherence behavior. Because these devices have not yet been independently evaluated, clinicians and researchers searching for an electronic adherence monitoring device must rely on incomplete information published by various device manufacturers to attempt to determine the best device for their needs.

Goal of the Study

The purpose of this study was to independently evaluate the accuracy of commercially-available electronic adherence monitoring devices. Along with her colleagues in the Center for Adherence and Self-Management, Dr. McGrady tested the devices according to a protocol reflecting four adherence behaviors. It is hoped that the results of this study provide clinicians and researchers with a comprehensive guide for selecting among available EAMDs.

Status of the Study

We have completed this study and the results have been published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

This study was supported by funding from the Center for Adherence and Self-Management at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.

Cancer treatment protocols for adolescents and young adults often include numerous medications administered at varied dosing schedules. Medication adherence (taking medications as prescribed) can be difficult, but is associated with better health outcomes among adolescents and young adults with cancer. To help make it easier for adolescents and young adults with cancer to take their medications as prescribed, it is important that we understand the challenges of taking medications and the things adolescents and young adults do to help make it easier. 

Goal of the Study

The purpose of this study is to identify the factors that are linked to higher levels of medication adherence among adolescents and young adults with cancer. Participants will be asked to complete surveys once every 4 months and store one of their medications in an electronic pill bottle. Dr. McGrady’s long-term goal is to use the results of this study to develop a patient-centered intervention to improve medication adherence among adolescents and young adults with cancer.

Status of the Study

We have completed enrollment and our participants are completing their study visits. For more information, please contact our study team at COMPASS@cchmc.org.

This study is funded by the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health.