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2019

Researchers at Cincinnati Children’s make a breakthrough discovery by growing an entire organ system, including the liver, pancreas and biliary system, in a dish, and their findings are published in the journal Nature. The goal is to be able use such organs for transplantation within a decade.

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2019

Cure

Cincinnati Children’s researchers grow the world’s first integrated system of three organs — liver, pancreas and biliary ducts — in miniature, in a single lab dish. This marks an unprecedented opportunity to study human development for drug development, disease modeling, personalized medicine and possibly transplantable tissue. Thinking big means kids can live big.

Karnail Singh, PhD, along with his co-principal Paul Spearman, MD, is developing a vaccine that could neutralize all four species of the Ebola virus.

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Cure

Cincinnati Children’s investigates a new universal Ebola vaccine that could protect against all four of the virus species that infect humans. The disease — to which children are especially vulnerable — has killed nearly 13,000 people since its first outbreak in Africa in 1976. All kids can persevere with scientific advancement.

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Care

Cincinnati Children’s expands our collaboration with TriHealth to better support pregnant women and their babies who need comprehensive, specialized fetal care. It begins with the expansion of Cincinnati Fetal Center’s special delivery unit that includes two new operating rooms and dedicated rooms for labor, delivery and postpartum recovery. As a result, fewer babies will require urgent transport and moms will no longer stay behind at a birthing hospital and have to be separated from their newborns.

With a new approach to care, moms and kids can get a better start in life.

2018

U.S. News & World Report named Cincinnati Children’s the No. 2 children’s hospital in the nation for 2018–2019. Awards are a welcome affirmation of our commitment, but as this video attests, we’re in it for the kids.

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2018

Care

U.S. News & World Report ranks Cincinnati Children’s the No. 2 hospital in the nation. For the past decade, U.S. News has ranked us among the top three overall in the nation, placing us in the top 10 in all 10 specialty categories. Whatever the patients’ needs, kids can excel here.

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Care

Parents magazine names Cincinnati Children’s among the 20 most innovative children’s hospitals. Through innovation, kids can realize their incredible potential.

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Culture

The Human Rights Campaign recognizes Cincinnati Children's as a Healthcare Equality Leader for our care of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) patients and families. When health equity wins, kids can win.

q-collar
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Cure

Cincinnati Children’s researchers study the efficacy of the Q-Collar, an externally worn medical device that may help prevent some sports-related head injuries by slightly increasing blood volume in the cranium. Protected from harm, kids can keep going all out.

2017

The Community Impact Fund, started by Director of Pediatric Orthopaedics James McCarthy, MD, is improving the lives of local children by empowering local community partners—from food pantries to organizations supporting homeless families—through staff donations.

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2017

Community

Cincinnati Children’s staff establish the Community Impact Fund. Powered by employee donations, the fund makes annual awards to community partners to improve the lives of kids in at-risk neighborhoods. When their communities are supported, kids can thrive.

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Cure

In partnership with Ben-Gurion University, Cincinnati Children’s launches startup Xact Medical to commercialize the FIND system—Fast Intelligent Needle Delivery—that helps clinicians place a needle tip at any point in the body. The technology has already enhanced current treatments and offers promising future applications. When medicine works smarter, kids can play harder.

2016
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2016

Culture

Cincinnati Children’s introduces Care Promises, an employee-training program focused on bringing our values to every interaction with patients, families and one another, while learning from our best and worst experiences. In 2020, Cincinnati Children’s will wrap Care Promises into Our Expectations as part of our Culture work toward Pursuing Our Potential Together. When our culture is second to none, kids can be first.

Critical Care Building
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Care

The Board of Trustees approves the Clinical and Support Space Expansion project. The project, spurred by an extended record-high census, calls for construction of a 600,000 square-foot new space and the renovation of existing facilities at Burnet Campus. The new Critical Care Building will expand our capacity to approximately 770 beds throughout the entire medical center, including College Hill and Liberty Campus.

Proton Therapy
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Care

The Proton Therapy Center, one of only two such centers in the world owned by a children’s hospital, opens. The center allows Cincinnati Children’s to treat tumors with advanced precision radiation without damaging the healthy tissue that surrounds it—so kids can get back to growing and developing, pronto. More precise medicine means kids can heal faster.

Transformational work happens every day inside Cincinnati Children’s—and just outside, in the local neighborhood of Avondale. We’re investing millions in the local workforce, early childhood teacher training, home repairs, Wi-Fi access and more.

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Community

Cincinnati Children’s announces a commitment to invest $11.5 million in the Avondale community over a span of five years (2016–2021) to accelerate health outcomes. Our goal is to transform child and community health by encouraging community development, strengthening local nonprofit organizations and supporting workforce development. Kids can prevail when their cause becomes common.

Suicide prevention app

Someone in the U.S. commits suicide every 14 minutes. Cincinnati Children’s researcher John Pestian, MD, hopes to change that with the help of a phone app he’s created. The app looks for cues that a patient could be suicidal in their conversation by using a database and algorithms Dr. Pestian has spent a decade developing.

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Cure

A Cincinnati Children’s researcher and his team develop an app that could prevent suicide, the second leading cause of death for Americans age 15–24. The app’s massive database and algorithms “listen” to a patient’s conversation to determine if it sounds like the conversation of a suicidal person. With more tools at our disposal, more kids can overcome.

2014
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2014

Culture

Cincinnati Children’s joins the Schwartz Center Rounds program. Unlike traditional medical rounds, the Schwartz Center Rounds give caregivers a forum for the honest discussion of the emotional and social issues they face in caring for patients and families. The result is improved personal connections with patients and families, and increased compassion. When we remember the well-being of caregivers, kids can receive more compassionate care.

2013
Health Network Visit

Shawn’tez Thompson, who suffers from a rare disorder called cystinosis, benefits from the support of a case management team thanks to his family’s enrollment in the Health Network by Cincinnati Children’s.

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2013

Community

When Neighborhood Health Care Inc. closed, Cincinnati Children’s steps up to maintain healthcare services for thousands of uninsured and underinsured children at three Cincinnati Public Schools and the Harrison Community Health Clinic. We additionally establish the Health Network by Cincinnati Children’s to serve Medicaid patients. Where communities stand up, kids can stand tall.

2012
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2012

Care

The Ohio Children’s Hospitals’ Solutions for Patient Safety expands, adding 26 children’s hospitals from across the United States. This unparalleled collaborative, which originally consisted of eight Ohio pediatric hospitals established in 2009, allows Cincinnati Children’s to share learnings about safety in the joint pursuit of eliminating serious harm in all the nation’s children’s hospitals.

When safety comes first, kids can get back to their everyday lives faster.

2010
Michael Fisher
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2010

Culture

Michael Fisher takes the helm of Cincinnati Children’s as president and CEO on January 1, after serving on the Board of Trustees for five years. He names three guiding themes:

  1. First, do no harm.
  2. Be the best at getting better.
  3. Lead change.

New leadership perspectives drive change so kids can benefit from diverse ideas.

Patient Visit

We launched a new strategic plan — “Be the Best at Getting Better” — and embrace quality and safety as opportunity and obligation.

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Culture

With medical error, a persistent cause of death and injury in America, Cincinnati Children’s reconfirms its commitment to safety. By empowering all staff to speak up if they have a concern and reinforcing the concept of 200 percent accountability, the initiative results in a reduction of serious safety events. Fewer medical errors so kids can live unbridled.

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Care

Cincinnati Children’s began its intensive focus on transformational improvement in 1999, and our efforts through the years have resulted in better patient outcomes and family experiences, reduced infections, greater safety and efficiency, and significant savings to the healthcare system. To accelerate this work, in 2010, Cincinnati Children’s launches the James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence. When their hospitals excel, kids can too.

Ribbon Cutting

Investors and developers joined Cincinnati Children’s Michael Fisher, president and CEO (center), and Dee Ellingwood, senior vice president, Business Planning and Development (second from right), at the ribbon-cutting for the newly renovated Vernon Manor.

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Community

Cincinnati Children’s and partners –– Al. Neyer, the City of Cincinnati, the State of Ohio, the Avondale community, and REEAAL LLC — collaborate in the redevelopment of the 85-year-old Vernon Manor Hotel into office space for 600 hospital employees. REEAAL, an African-American-led real estate investment enterprise, holds the majority stake in the $37-millon project. Healthier communities inspire hope that kids can prosper.

Dr. Alvin Crawford

The director of Orthopaedic Surgery at Cincinnati Children’s for 29 years, Dr. Alvin Crawford founded the Crawford Spine Center in 2010. Dr. Crawford is world-renowned as an orthopedic surgeon and expert who has done incredible work here and as a surgeon in the Navy. The Crawford Spine Center is an example of our move toward more multidisciplinary and family-centered care, where families can go to one location and see all the subspecialists they need at once. This has resulted in better coordination of care, better outcomes for the child and easier access to care for the family.

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Care

Alvin Crawford, MD, a renowned trailblazer within the Cincinnati Children’s community, puts his retirement plans on hold to head up the newly named Crawford Spine Center. We build stronger bodies so kids can boldly step further into the future.