Lynn Babcock, MD, MS

Academic Affiliations

Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

Phone 513-803-2956

Email lynn.babcock@cchmc.org

Pediatric injury; traumatic brain injury; prehospital care

Dr. Babcock is a board-certified pediatric emergency medicine physician with over 10 years of experience caring for acutely ill and injured children. She was a member of the faculty of emergency medicine and pediatrics at the University of Rochester for nine years prior to joining Cincinnati Children's in the summer of 2009.

She has an extensive academic portfolio that includes numerous clinical, teaching, administrative and research pursuits. Her true scholarly passion is to make a difference in the outcome of children who sustain mild traumatic brain injuries.

Despite traumatic brain injuries being the leading cause of death and disability for children, research in this field has been insufficient as compared to its public health importance. Dr. Babcock is interested in uncovering novel serum markers and radiographic markers to predict the outcomes of children after sustaining a traumatic brain injury.

MD: Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ, 1995.

MS: University of Cincinnati, Clinical and Translational Science, Cincinnati, OH, 2012.

Residency: Pediatrics, Yale - New Haven Children's Hospital, 1998.

Fellowship: Pediatric Emergencey Medicine, Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 2001.

Certification: General Pediatrics, 1998, 2005; Pediatric Emergency Medicine, 2002, 2012.

View PubMed Publications

Dexheimer JW, Kurowski B, Anders SH, McClanahan N, Wade SL, Babcock L. Usability evaluation of the SMART application for youth with mTBI. Int J Med Inform. 2017;97:(163-170).

Babcock L, Olsen C, Borgialli D, Jaffe D, Leonard J and Cspine study group for the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN). Cervical spine injuries in children due to sports and recreational activities. Ped Emerg Care. 2016 Sept 30.

Rhine T, Zhang N, Wade S, Leach J, Babcock L. Are UCH-L1 and GFAP promising biomarkers for children with mild traumatic brain injury? Brain Inj. 2016 Jul 14:1-8.

Babcock L, Yuan W, Leach J, Nash T, Wade S. White matter alterations in youth with acute mild traumatic brain injury. J Pediatr Rehabil Med. 2015 Dec 1;8(4):285-96.

Faris G, Byczkowski T, Ho M, Babcock L. Prediction of Persistent Postconcussion Symptoms in Youth Using a Neuroimaging Decision Rule. Acad Pediatr. 2015 Oct 30.

Hang B, Babcock L, Hornung R, Ho M, Pomerantz WJ. Can Computerized Neuropsychological Testing in the Emergency Department Predict Recovery for Young Athletes With Concussions? Ped Emerg Care. 2015 Oct; 31(10): 688-93.

Yuan W, Wade SL, Babcock L. Structural connectivity abnormality in children with acute mild traumatic brain injury using graph theoretical analysis. Hum Brain Map. 2015 Feb;36(2):779-92.

Babcock L, Byczkowski T, Bazarian J. Inability of S100B to predict postconcussion syndrome in children with mild traumatic brain injury. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2013 Apr;29(4):458-61.

Babcock L, Byczkowski T, Wade SL, Ho M, Mookerjee S, Bazarian JL. Predicting postconcussion syndrome after mild traumatic brain injury in children and adolescents who present to the emergency department. JAMA Pediatr. 2013 Feb;167(2):156-61.

Established Status Epilepticus Treatment Trial (ESETT). Site Principal Investigator. National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke. Oct 2013-Sep 2018. 1U01NS088034-01.

Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network Study (PECARN). Principal Investigator. Emergency Medical Services for Children/Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the Health Resources and Services Administration. Nov 2015-Oct 2019. U03MC22684.