Kim M. Cecil, PhD

Spectroscopist, Imaging Research Center

Academic Affiliations

Professor, UC Department of Radiology

UC Department of Pediatrics

Phone 513-636-8559

Fax 513-636-3754



Magnetic resonance spectroscopy; creatine deficiency syndromes


Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy; inborn errors of metabolism; environmental exposures to lead manganese, air pollution, PBDEs, PFCs; traumatic brain injury including concussion; ADHD; bipolar disorders; breast cancer; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Kim M. Cecil, PhD, received her undergraduate and postgraduate training in chemistry. After a post-doctoral fellowship in magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Cecil joined the Department of Radiology and the Imaging Research Center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in 1998. She serves as an imaging research scientist and clinical MR spectroscopist.

In 2000, Kim M. Cecil, PhD, Antonius deGrauw, MD, PhD, and Gajja Salomons, PhD, discovered creatine transporter deficiency syndrome, a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the creatine transporter gene (SLC6A8). Male patients demonstrate a significant reduction or absence of creatine in the brain, as indicated by MR spectroscopy. This is an X-linked mental retardation disorder thought to be second only to fragile X in prevalence.

BS: Chemistry & Mathematics (magna cum laude), Kentucky Wesleyan College, 1988.

MS: Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, 1991.

PhD: Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, 1993.

Fellowship: Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

View PubMed Publications

Clark JF, Cecil KM. Diagnostic methods and recommendations for the cerebral creatine deficiency syndromes. Pediatr Res. 2015;77:398-405.

Maugans TA, Farley C, Altaye M, Leach J, Cecil KM. Pediatric sports-related concussion produces cerebral blood flow alterations. Pediatrics. 2012;129:28-37.

Cecil KM, Dietrich KN, Altaye M, et al. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in adults with childhood lead exposure. Environ Health Perspect. 2011;119:403-8.

Brubaker CJ, Dietrich KN, Lanphear BP, Cecil KM. The influence of age of lead exposure on adult gray matter volume. Neurotoxicology. 2010;31:259-66.

Brubaker CJ, Schmithorst VJ, Haynes EN, et al. Altered myelination and axonal integrity in adults with childhood lead exposure: a diffusion tensor imaging study. Neurotoxicology. 2009;30:867-75.

Yuan W, Holland SK, Cecil KM, et al. The impact of early childhood lead exposure on brain organization: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study of language function. Pediatrics. 2006;118:971-7.

Salomons GS, van Dooren SJ, Verhoeven NM, et al. X-linked creatine-transporter gene (SLC6A8) defect: a new creatine-deficiency syndrome. Am J Hum Genet. 2001;68:1497-500.

Cecil KM, Salomons GS, Ball WS Jr, et al. Irreversible brain creatine deficiency with elevated serum and urine creatine: a creatine transporter defect? Ann Neurol. 2001;49:401-4.

Strakowski SM, DelBello MP, Adler C, Cecil KM, Sax KW. Neuroimaging in bipolar disorder. Bipolar Disord. 2000;2:148-64.

Roebuck JR, Cecil KM, Schnall MD, Lenkinski RE. Human breast lesions: characterization with proton MR spectroscopy. Radiology. 1998;209:269-75.

Impact of PBDE and PFC Exposures: Internalizing Behaviors and Neuroimaging Outcomes. Co-Principal Investigator. CHRF GAP Funding. Jan 2016-Dec 2016.

MRS of Creatine Transporter Deficiency Syndrome. Principal Investigator. Lumos Pharma. Sept 2015-Sept 2016.

Outcome of NASH in Adolescents after Bariatric Surgery vs. Lifestyle Intervention. Co-Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Sept 2013-Aug 2018. R01 DK100429.

Neurobehavioral and Neuroimaging Effects of Traffic Exposure in Children. Co-Investigator. National Institutes of Health. Jun 2012-May 2017. R01 ES019890.

Anomalous Motor Physiology in ADHD. Co-Investigator. National Institutes of Health. May 2012-Apr 2017. R01 MH095014.