Alan P. Kenny, MD, PhD

Academic Affiliations

Instructor, UC Department of Pediatrics

Phone 513-803-2224

Fax 513-636-7868



Neonatal care; neonatal lung disease; neonatal malformations and anomalies


Lung progenitor development; stem cell differentiation; fetal malformations

Alan P. Kenny, MD, PhD, focuses his research on elucidating the molecular mechanisms controlling the earliest stages of respiratory and digestive organ development. Available evidence suggests that early lung, liver, and pancreas lineages develop from a pool of foregut progenitor cells in the ventral endoderm. They are induced by FGF and BMP signals emanating from the cardiogenic mesenchyme during early somite stages of development through a mechanism that is highly conserved among vertebrates. Despite significant gains in our understanding of this process, fundamentally important questions remain unanswered. First, how are the common foregut organ progenitors specified? Second, how are FGF and BMP pathways spatiotemporally coordinated such that different organs are induced from the common foregut progenitor? A third and most intriguing question is - what are the endoderm genetic programs activated in response to induction from mesoderm that ultimately direct specific foregut organ development?

These questions remain unanswered mostly due to experimental limitations inherent in mouse embryos, which are small and difficult to dissect at such an early stage. Dr. Kenny uses the experimental advantages of the large, externally developing, abundant Xenopus embryos to address these critical, unresolved issues. Specifically, Dr. Kenny is testing his hypothesis that cardiogenic FGF and BMP signaling of different durations induce different organs. Dr. Kenny’s microarray experiment to identify the endodermal genes induced very early in response to mesodermal signaling. Surprisingly, several negative regulators of BMP signaling were induced early by mesoderm signaling. My preliminary work suggests the hypothesis that BMP inhibitory feedback is a critical component induced during early foregut organ progenitor development. This work should ultimately increase our understanding of normal and abnormal early fetal organ development, lending further insight into foregut malformations such as tracheoesophageal fistula and congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Additionally, this work aims to offer better means to direct human embryonic stem cells toward more foregut organ-specific cell fates for therapeutic purposes.

MD: University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, 2002.

PhD: Biology.

Residency: Golisano Children’s Hospital at Strong, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 2002-2005.

Fellowship: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, 2005-2008.

Certifications: In Pediatrics, 2007 American Board of Pediatrics; American Board of Pediatrics, Board Eligible in Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, 2008.

View PubMed Publications

Agricola ZN, Jagpal AK, Allbee AW, Prewitt AR, Shifley ET, Rankin SA, Zorn AM, Kenny AP. Identification of Genes Specific to Migrating Primitive Myeloid Lineage in Xenopus laevis. Developmental Dynamics. 2016;245(1):47-55.

Nolan K, Kattamuri C, Luedeke DM, Deng X, Jagpal A, Zhang F, Linhardt RJ, Kenny AP, Zorn AM, Thompson TB. Structure of Protein Related to DAN and Cerberus (PRDC): Insights into the Mechanism of BMP Antagonism. Structure. 2013 Aug 6;21(8):1417-29.

Kenny AP, Tabangin M, Hall E, Woodrooffe K, Lai W, Meinzen-Derr J, Hopkin RJ, Greenberg JM. Cincinnati Regional Incidence, Morbidity, and Mortality of Neonatal Foregut Defects and High Coincidence with Cardiovascular Malformations. Journal of Neonatal Biology. 2013;2:1-7.

Shifley ET, Kenny AP, Rankin SA, Zorn AM. Prolonged FGF signaling is necessary for lung and liver induction in Xenopus. BMC Developmental Biology. 2012;12(27).

Kenny AP, Rankin SA, Allbee AW, Prewitt AR, Zhang Z, Shifley ET, Louza MP, Zorn AM. Sizzled-tolloid interactions maintain foregut progenitors by regulating fibronectin-dependent BMP signaling. Developmental Cell. 2012;23(2):292-304.