At Cincinnati Children’s, we believe in the power of genomics. We know that by integrating genomic discovery and clinical care, we will be able to better diagnose, treat, and prevent many diseases that affect children.

This cutting-edge approach to providing precision care is why we launched the Center for Pediatric Genomics (CpG). Today, CpG thrives under co-directors Anne Slavotinek, MBBS, PhD, director of the Division of Human Genetics, Matthew Weirauch, PhD, and John Hogenesch, PhD.

Our Mission & Core Values

Our mission at the Center for Pediatric Genomics is to accelerate discovery and advance genomic knowledge. To achieve this, CpG fosters and incubates outstanding and innovative scientific and translational genomic projects. Additionally, we engage and educate our institutional community, as well as the public, to strengthen their understanding about the power and promise of genomics. As a visionary leader in pediatric genomics our ultimate goal is to discover causes and cures – and fast-track that knowledge into clinical care – to benefit children worldwide.

Our Approach to Research

Cincinnati Children's is committed to transforming child health with our collaborative culture of discovery, translation, and learning.

Each year, as an integral part of our mission, CpG invests $1 million in pilot projects within the Cincinnati Children's community to incubate outstanding and innovative scientific and translational genomic projects.

We foster work that will unravel genomic mysteries through various pathways of research, including analyzing DNA variation; examining gene expression and regulation; determining the impact of environmental-gene interactions; and investigating genomic causes of disease. In addition, we use technologies, such as whole genome sequencing (WGS), exome sequencing, single cell RNA sequencing, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) to find and understand clues that enhance patient diagnosis and treatment.

To promote multidisciplinary collaboration, CpG connects researchers with the resources and people to move projects forward. This includes bringing together basic scientists with clinical experts; researchers across departments who are working on similar challenges; and guiding researchers to the technology and specialized expertise needed for their projects. This approach builds teams with the pockets of knowledge needed to assemble the puzzle and solve molecular mysteries.

CpG believes it is critical to value and engage everyone – including our clinical, research, and patient and family communities – in the pursuit of genomic discoveries and their clinical implementation.

The National Genomic Landscape: Leading the Way

On a national level, the All of Us initiative (formerly Precision Medicine Initiative) has the goal of getting one million people signed up to build one of the largest health databases in the United States. All of Us participants agree to provide health information through their electronic health records, surveys, fitness trackers, blood tests, and genomic sequencing. Cincinnati Children’s has signed an institutional agreement with All of Us to give our researchers access to this data through the All of Us Researcher Workbench. This deidentified database can only be used by recognized academic researchers with institutional approval to protect participant privacy and data security. With access to such a large cohort of health data, our researchers will be able to delve deeper into discovery to find causes, cures, prevention strategies, and treatments for a variety of common and rare childhood diseases.