Grant: Endowed Scholar Award
PI: Stephen Becker, Ph.D.
Collaborators: Jeff Epstein, Ph.D., John Mitchell, PhD (Duke University)

A growing body of research indicates that SCT symptoms are (1) prevalent in children with and without ADHD, (2) associated with academic, social, and psychological impairments, and (3) not assessed or targeted in any evidence-based interventions. With regard to latter, it is premature to assume that evidenced based treatments for ADHD will be effective for SCT. In fact, there is emerging evidence that empirically-supported treatments for ADHD may not be as effective in children with SCT, with SCT symptoms being associated with poorer response for both home-school behavioral interventions for children with ADHD (Owens et al., 2016) and stimulant medication (Froehlich et al., 2018). Although our understanding of SCT has increased over the years, an evidence-based treatment specifically targeting SCT behaviors and associated impairments is essential in order to improve the course of functioning for these children. Therefore, a necessary first step is to use mixed methods, including quantitative scales and qualitative interviews, to assess the breadth and nature of SCT-related behaviors in order to inform treatment targets and strategies. The aims of this study are to use mixed methods, including quantitative scales and qualitative interviews, to (1) understand the nature of SCT and its impact on daily life functioning, (2) learn about previous treatment attempts for individuals displaying SCT symptoms, and (3) understand what treatment targets and modalities are perceived as most important and acceptable.

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