A photo of Mark Paterno.

Scientific Director, Division of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy

Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

513-636-0517

513-636-6374

"I believe that every patient has a story to tell about their injury, their condition and their goals for healing. Understanding their story is key to applying the right treatment at the right time for each patient."

My Biography & Research

Biography

As a physical therapist, I specialize in caring for athletes with musculoskeletal injuries. My focus is on those who have sustained acute or overuse injuries to their upper and lower extremities, especially ACL injuries.

At a young age I was exposed to the field of physical therapy and athletic training. This experience convinced me to pursue a career in healthcare. I’ve found that working with young patients and helping them regain their function is incredibly rewarding. It’s what motivates me each day as a clinician and as a scientist.

My practice is rooted in evidence-based care, and my philosophy of care is based on listening carefully to my patients. I believe that every patient has a story to tell about their injury, their condition and their goals for healing. Understanding their story is key to applying the right treatment at the right time for each patient.

My research focuses on improving outcomes after ACL injuries in young athletes. We first worked to identify the incidence and mechanism of a second ACL injury after ACL reconstruction. We are now building on our earlier work to create new criteria for releasing an athlete to resume activity after ACL reconstruction. We are also developing new models of care that can help with safe and effective transitions back to playing sports.

I was honored to receive the 2019 Ron Peyton Award and Lectureship from the American Academy of Sports Physical Therapy. Our research was recognized with the 2018 STOP Sports Injuries Award from the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. And we also received the National Collegiate Athletic Association Research Award in 2010.

When I’m not helping patients or focusing on research, I enjoy spending time with my family.

Clinical Interests

Sports medicine; ACL injuries in female athletes and balance and proprioception.

Academic Affiliation

Professor, UC Department of Pediatrics

Clinical Divisions

Sports Medicine, Occupational Therapy

Research Divisions

Sports Medicine

My Locations

  • Winslow

    Winslow

    2800 Winslow Ave.
    Cincinnati, Ohio 45206
    1-513-636-4366

My Education

PT, MS: Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY, 1994.

EMBA: Troy State University, Troy AL, 2002.

PhD: Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions, Provo, UT.

Certifications: Sports Certified Specialist (SCS) 2001; NATA certified Athletic Trainer, 1998.

My Publications

Treatment after anterior cruciate ligament injury: Panther Symposium ACL Treatment Consensus Group. Diermeier, T; Rothrauff, BB; Engebretsen, L; Lynch, AD; Ayeni, OR; Paterno, MV; Xerogeanes, JW; Fu, FH; Karlsson, J; Musahl, V; et al. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy. 2020; 28:2390-2402.

Treatment after anterior cruciate ligament injury: Panther Symposium ACL Treatment Consensus Group. Diermeier, T; Rothrauff, BB; Engebretsen, L; Lynch, AD; Ayeni, OR; Paterno, MV; Xerogeanes, JW; Fu, FH; Karlsson, J; Musahl, V; et al. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy. 2020; 28:2390-2402.

Effects of maturation on knee biomechanics during cutting and landing in young female soccer players. Westbrook, AE; Taylor, JB; Nguyen, A; Paterno, MV; Ford, KR. PLoS ONE. 2020; 15:e0233701-e0233701.

Effects of maturation on knee biomechanics during cutting and landing in young female soccer players. Westbrook, AE; Taylor, JB; Nguyen, A; Paterno, MV; Ford, KR. PLoS ONE. 2020; 15:e0233701-e0233701.

Change in Drop-Landing Mechanics Over 2 Years in Young Athletes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction. Ithurburn, MP; Paterno, MV; Thomas, S; Pennell, ML; Evans, KD; Magnussen, RA; Schmitt, LC. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2019; 47:2608-2616.

Change in Drop-Landing Mechanics Over 2 Years in Young Athletes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction. Ithurburn, MP; Paterno, MV; Thomas, S; Pennell, ML; Evans, KD; Magnussen, RA; Schmitt, LC. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2019; 47:2608-2616.

Lower patient-reported function at 2 years is associated with elevated knee cartilage T1rho and T2 relaxation times at 5 years in young athletes after ACL reconstruction. Ithurburn, MP; Zbojniewicz, AM; Thomas, S; Evans, KD; Pennell, ML; Magnussen, RA; Paterno, MV; Schmitt, LC. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy. 2019; 27:2643-2652.

Patient and Parent Perceptions of Rehabilitation Factors That Influence Outcomes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Clearance to Return to Sport in Adolescents and Young Adults. Paterno, MV; Schmitt, LC; Thomas, S; Duke, N; Russo, R; Quatman-Yates, CC. Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy. 2019; 49:576-583.

Lower patient-reported function at 2 years is associated with elevated knee cartilage T1rho and T2 relaxation times at 5 years in young athletes after ACL reconstruction. Ithurburn, MP; Zbojniewicz, AM; Thomas, S; Evans, KD; Pennell, ML; Magnussen, RA; Paterno, MV; Schmitt, LC. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy. 2019; 27:2643-2652.

Patient and Parent Perceptions of Rehabilitation Factors That Influence Outcomes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Clearance to Return to Sport in Adolescents and Young Adults. Paterno, MV; Schmitt, LC; Thomas, S; Duke, N; Russo, R; Quatman-Yates, CC. Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy. 2019; 49:576-583.