Curriculum

The training objectives of the Psychology Postdoctoral Fellowship Program at Cincinnati Children’s are specific to each focus area, with a varying balance between clinical and research concentrations. Each focus area has a training lead who will provide additional oversight of a fellow’s training plan, including preparation for licensure.

Focus Areas

The Psychology Postdoctoral Fellowship offers several focus areas. Applicants designate their primary interests and are accepted to the program with their training focus area pre-identified. Focus areas include:

Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Center for ADHD

The Center for ADHD, housed within the Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, is composed of a multi-disciplinary team of researchers and clinicians devoted entirely to improving the care of children and adolescents with ADHD. Center for ADHD faculty are highly productive and hold numerous foundation grants and federal grants from the NIH and the Institute of Education Sciences (IES). Ongoing studies focus on sleep functioning in teens with and without ADHD, sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT), driving in teens with ADHD, effects of methylphenidate discontinuation, and academic skills in adolescents with high-functioning autism. Fellows will obtain experience in multiple research designs (experimental, prospective longitudinal, intervention, school-based), disseminating research through presentations and publications, and contributing to grant-writing activities. Fellowships in the center are typically two years. During the second year, fellows are encouraged to write and submit their own grant proposals. Fellows receive weekly clinical and research mentoring with the goal of ensuring that they are highly competitive job applicants upon completion of fellowship. For information about these fellowship opportunities, please contact Jeff Epstein, PhD, jeff.epstein@cchmc.org or Stephen Becker, PhD, stephen.becker@cchmc.org.

Postdoctoral Fellowship in Psychology within the Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics and Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: Clinical

The Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics (DDBP) in collaboration with the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry is offering one (one-year) fellowship position. The fellow will spend 50 percent of their training in the inpatient developmental psychiatry acute stabilization program within the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry serving children and adolescents dually diagnosed with developmental disabilities and mental health disorders. The fellow will be actively involved in the behavioral assessment, development and implementation of individualized treatment programs to treat severe problem behavior, parent and caregiver training, as well as participation in daily interdisciplinary rounds and family meetings. This training offers fellows the opportunity to experience a broad range of experiential learning from a multi-disciplinary team who cares for complex children with the goal of developing entry-level professionals with a broad skill and knowledge base to treat a range of severe behavior challenges in children with developmental disabilities. The fellow will also spend 50 percent of their training within DDBP in the Brief Intensive Behavioral Treatment (BIBT) program. BIBT is an outpatient treatment clinic for children/adolescents with developmental disabilities and moderate-to-severe behavior problems who have not been successful in traditional outpatient behavioral treatment or require a higher level of care. The program includes ABA treatment, including functional analysis of behavior, for broad concerns ranging from pica to aggression. Fellows will serve as a member of a multi-disciplinary team that consists of developmental pediatricians, psychiatrists, psychologists, speech-language pathologists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, and social work. For more information, please contact the DDBP Psychology Training Director Rebekah Ridgeway, PsyD, rebekah.ridgeway@cchmc.org.

Postdoctoral Fellowships in Psychology within the Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics: Community Consultation

The Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics (DDBP) is offering one (one-year) fellowship position which focuses on clinical training in a Demonstration Classroom within the Kelly O’Leary Center (TKOC) for Autism Spectrum Disorders and partnered with the Cincinnati Public School District (CPS). The fellow will participate in clinical training in the Demonstration Classroom under the supervision of Dr. Melissa Foti-Hoff serving early elementary age children with autism spectrum disorder. The fellow will be actively involved in the development and implementation of Individual Education Plans (IEPs), skill acquisition (academic and self-help), individual and classroom behavior management, data collection procedures, and teacher and paraprofessional staff training. The psychology fellowship program offers trainees the opportunity to experience a broad range of experiential learning from a multi-disciplinary team (psychology, speech pathology, occupational therapy and education) who care for complex children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder in an educational setting. The goal is to develop entry-level professionals with a broad skill and knowledge base to educate children with autism spectrum disorder in effective classroom settings. The Demonstration Classroom is a brisk-paced environment that allows opportunities for fellows to master how to work efficiently in a classroom setting. In addition to the Demonstration Classroom, the fellow will select an elective rotation within the short term behavior treatment program, Brief Intensive Behavior Intervention (BIBT) program, or the Early Intensive Behavior Intervention (EIBI) program. Fellows may also have the opportunity to participate in the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and related Disabilities (LEND) program. For more information, please contact the DDBP Psychology Training Director Rebekah Ridgeway, PsyD, rebekah.ridgeway@cchmc.org.

Postdoctoral Fellowships in Psychology within the Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics: Evaluation and Treatment

The Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics (DDBP) is offering one to two (one-year) fellowship positions which focus on the evaluation and treatment of infants, children, and adolescents (and their families) who present with a variety of neurodevelopmental disabilities and chronic handicapping conditions within an interdisciplinary, outpatient setting. Conditions may include developmental delay, Autism, ADHD, discipline and behavioral problems, and intellectual and learning disabilities. At least one of the fellowships may be predominately in The Kelly O’Leary Center (TKOC) for Autism Spectrum Disorders. Both positions are primarily clinical with the option of some research training. The positions are assessment focused (primarily diagnostic assessment) with several elective rotation possibilities from which to select, including adolescent assessment clinic, short-term behavior treatment, early intensive behavior intervention, and Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (fellows selecting PCIT will receive official PCIT training which prepares them for their application for PCIT certification if they choose). Fellows may also have the opportunity to participate in the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and related Disabilities (LEND) program. For more information, please contact the DDBP Psychology Training Director Rebekah Ridgeway, PsyD, rebekah.ridgeway@cchmc.org.

Autism Research

Postdoctoral Fellowship in Psychology within the Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics and Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: Research

The Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics (DDBP) in collaboration with the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry is offering one (one- or two-year) research fellowship position. As a post-doctoral collaborating with the Behavioral and Developmental Neuropsychiatry Research team led by Craig Erickson, MD, the fellow will have widespread involvement in numerous research protocols examining pathophysiological mechanisms and treatment efficacy in individuals with neurodevelopmental disabilities (NDDs), including autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and Fragile X Syndrome (FXS). The primary responsibility during fellowship will be the development, implementation, and analysis of cross-methodological experimental paradigms (e.g., neuropsychological, sensorimotor, neurological (e.g., EEG, fMRI, TMS) investigating sensory, motor, cognitive, and social aspects of NDDs for the identification of intermediate phenotypes and development of outcome measures for treatment trials. With the broad scope of the ongoing studies, fellows will have the opportunity to develop new technical and analytical skills, while beginning to establish their own line of independent research. In addition, as a clinical psychology fellow, the fellow will obtain, if desired, supervised clinical hours involving work on the diagnosis and treatment of NDDs. A strong background and interest in neuroscience, experimental design, statistical analysis, and neurodevelopmental disorders is recommended for this position. The ideal candidate has a primary research focus, but may be interested in maintaining clinical involvement throughout his/her career, with hopes of entering a tenure-track research faculty position at an academic institution/medical center in the future. For more information, please contact the DDBP Psychology Training Director Rebekah Ridgeway, PsyD, rebekah.ridgeway@cchmc.org.

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center announces the availability of a Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Division of Adolescent Medicine Eating Disorders Treatment and Research

Successful candidates for this two-year fellowship position will have evidence-based clinical experience in child and adolescent psychology. They should have experience conducting research and have strong interests in ultimately pursuing a career specializing in the field of pediatric eating disorders. The fellow will provide clinical services on a continuum of care, including inpatient medical and outpatient treatment, with a focus on family-based interventions for eating disorders. They will gain experience in complimentary clinical areas, including obsessive compulsive disorder, feeding disorders, transgender clinic, and hospital-wide consultation/liaison services. The fellow will also have 20 percent protected research time to work on collaborative projects and, ultimately, an independent project. For information about these fellowship opportunities, please contact Abigail Matthews, PhD, abigail.matthews@cchmc.org.

Neuropsychology fellows are based in the Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology. This two-year program is designed for the practice of pediatric neuropsychology and is fashioned around guidelines provided by the International Neuropsychological Society (INS), Division 40 of the American Psychological Association (APA), the Association of Postdoctoral Programs in Clinical Neuropsychology (APPCN) and the Houston Conference for advanced specialty training in clinical neuropsychology.

Approximately 70 percent of fellows’ time is spent in the delivery of clinical services. Major experiences are provided through the Oncology program (fellowship year one), the Inpatient Neurorehabilitation Unit (fellowship year two) and general outpatient assessment service (fellowship years one and two). First-year fellows also spend one day a week at the Cincinnati Veterans Administration Hospital to broaden their clinical experience with adult populations.

Minor rotations and training opportunities include:

  • Neuropsychology Inpatient Consultation Service
  • Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery Team
  • Movement Disorders Clinic
  • Outpatient Psychotherapy
  • Supervision of Trainees
  • Neuropsychology Research

Professional development skills are sharpened through collaboration with various multidisciplinary clinics.  Educational and training experiences and research activities account for 30 percent of the fellows’ time. Current research projects focus on a wide range of populations including children with traumatic brain injury, epilepsy and sleep disorders.

Please note that, to allow for interviews to occur at the annual INS meeting, the application deadline for the Neuropsychology Fellowship may differ from the other fellowships in our division. Application details, as well as additional information about our clinical, research and didactic training experiences are available in our training brochure. You may download the Neuropsychology Training Brochure in portable document format (.pdf).

For more information contact Dean Beebe, PhD, ABPP, dean.beebe@cchmc.org

NIH T32 Postdoctoral Fellowships in the Center for Adherence and Self-Management

The Center for Adherence and Self-Management has two open research fellowship positions funded by a NIH-NICHD T32 training grant in treatment adherence research and involves all center faculty. This position affords extensive opportunities in multidisciplinary research with faculty in clinical psychology, pediatrics, and biostatistics. Program fellows have opportunities to conduct research in the following areas: measurement of adherence to treatment including electronic monitoring, behavioral and pharmacological approaches, statistical methods, including predictive models of influence on adherence to treatment, studies of the relationship of adherence to clinical outcomes and clinical trials to promote treatment adherence and health outcomes for a range of chronic conditions. For information about these fellowship opportunities, please contact program director Kevin Hommel, PhD, kevin.hommel@cchmc.org.

Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Patient and Family Wellness Center in the Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute

The Patient and Family Wellness Center in the Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute (Ahna Pai, PhD, Director) and Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology are collaborating to offer one, two-year research fellowship position in psychosocial hematology and oncology research. This position provides a tailored training experience with clinical and research faculty in the Patient and Family Wellness Center. This position affords extensive opportunities in multidisciplinary research with faculty in clinical psychology, pediatrics, and biostatistics. Program fellows have opportunities to conduct research in the following areas: measurement of psychosocial distress, treatment adherence, survivorship, bone marrow transplant, statistical methods, and clinical trials to promote psychosocial and health outcomes for the patients and families served by the Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute. For more information, visit the Patient and Family Wellness Center. For more information about the position, contact Dr. Pai, ahna.pai@cchmc.org.

T32 Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Center for Child Behavior and Nutrition Research and Training

Funded by a NIH-NIDDK T32 training grant (T32DK063929; Co-PIs Meg H. Zeller, PhD, and Scott W. Powers, PhD, ABPP), the Center for Child Behavior and Nutrition Research and Training trains promising clinical researchers in the fields of behavioral medicine, pediatrics, and nutrition science to establish research skills necessary for designing and conducting innovative, programmatic clinical research that will ultimately lead to better nutrition-related health care for youth across the pediatric age range. Fellows in this program engage in specialized research training in targeting the improvement of outcomes for youth with chronic medical conditions for which nutrition management and/or dietary change are key components of care. Through mentored experiences with NIH-funded faculty, the fellow will gain research training in study design and execution (randomized clinical trials, observational longitudinal outcome studies), manuscript writing, and grant preparation. Additional mentorship is provided through team collaborations with affiliated T32 faculty in pediatric endocrinology, gastroenterology, surgery, pulmonary medicine, allergy and immunology, neurology, as well as nutrition and basic science. For the upcoming cycle, applicants with specific interests in obesity prevention in children 0 to 24 months and 2 to 5 years, nutrition in cystic fibrosis (lori.stark@cchmc.org), family-based obesity interventions for school-age children, co-occurrence of health risk behaviors (obesity, substance use, sexual risk behaviors), adolescent and young adult severe obesity, and bariatric surgery (meg.zeller@cchmc.org), pediatric migraine, and adherence to nutrition treatment in young children with chronic illness (scott.powers@cchmc.org) are encouraged to apply. These are two-year positions (required). For information about these fellowship opportunities, please contact Meg H. Zeller, PhD, meg.zeller@cchmc.org.

Postdoctoral Fellowship in Pediatric Pain Psychology

The Pediatric Pain Research Program has one open position. The position involves a large multi-site NIH funded study on cognitive behavioral and exercise-based treatment of adolescents with juvenile fibromyalgia. The pain fellow will serve as a research therapist on this clinical trial as well as other treatment studies in pediatric chronic pain and rheumatic diseases. The fellow will have opportunities to participate in study coordination, manuscript preparation, and participate in multiple related research projects on the topic of pediatric chronic pain in collaboration with researchers at the Pain Center, the Imaging Research Center, and Divisions of Rheumatology, Gastroenterology, and Sports Medicine. Projects may include validation of pediatric pain assessment instruments, assessment of physical activity and quantitative sensory testing/functional imaging of pain. Additional clinical training opportunities are available at the multidisciplinary Pain Service and include outpatient and inpatient cognitive-behavioral therapy for pain management and biofeedback. Pain research fellowships are typically two years. For information, please contact program director Susmita Kashikar-Zuck, PhD, susmita.kashikar-zuck@cchmc.org.

Postdoctoral Fellowship in Sickle Cell Disease Psychosocial Research

The Sickle Cell Disease Psychosocial Research Program within the Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology has one open position. During this one- or two-year mentored experience, the fellow will serve in a leadership role and work on multiple federally-funded studies of sickle cell disease and patient/family engagement, including intervention studies focusing on promoting self-management/adherence and transition readiness in adolescents and young adults, collaborating with stakeholders to improve care and outcomes, and shared-decision making. Additional training opportunities are available in quality improvement, qualitative methods, and participatory research methods with other chronic disease populations. The fellow will also have the opportunity to participate in clinical training opportunities offered by the division. For information, please contact program director Lori E. Crosby, PsyD, lori.crosby@cchmc.org.

Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Traumatic Brain Injury Research Center

The Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Research Center is within the Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. This one- or two-year fellowship provides training opportunities through work on multiple federally-funded studies of traumatic brain injury and other neurological disorders, including intervention studies focusing on preventing post concussive syndrome, promoting family adaptation and parenting skills following TBI in infancy/early childhood, improving outcomes in adolescents with TBI, epilepsy and brain tumors, and facilitating participation and functional outcomes in adolescents with TBI. Training will be provided through an apprenticeship model incorporating active mentoring, career development, professional role identity, and development of skills in clinical research and care that ensures success as a scientist-practitioner. It is anticipated that at least 80 percent time would be devoted to research activities. For information, please contact program director Shari Wade, PhD, shari.wade@cchmc.org.

Training Objectives

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Postdoctoral training in psychology occurs under the supervision of licensed psychologists and occurs over a one to two year period. Based upon Ohio state law and the criteria for listing in the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APICC), there are not year specific objectives for training. Our program at Cincinnati Children’s has the following goals and objectives that are forwarded to the State Board of Psychology each year when our program reports the individuals under supervision for the upcoming year. Specifically, at the conclusion of training (1 – 2 years), the:

Fellow will be able to provide clinical care that is based in theoretical and empirical knowledge bases.

Fellow will be able to provide clinical care in a manner, which is sensitive to individual differences of all persons, is non-discriminatory, and which respects and protects human and civil rights.

Fellow will be able to provide clinical care only within the context of a professional relationship and according to American Psychological Association Ethical Codes and standards. 

Fellow will know and apply the rules governing Psychologists under Ohio Psychology Law.

Fellow may participate in umbrella supervision in accordance with Ohio law.

Fellow will be able to interact professionally and responsibly with colleagues from other disciplines.

Fellow will provide professional consultation in a manner, which respects and protects the individual differences of humans.

Fellow will show a primary obligation and take reasonable precautions to respect the confidentiality rights of those with whom they work or consult.

Fellow will know procedures for addressing any personal signs of impairment in self, colleagues, and faculty.

Clinical Responsibilities and Lines of Supervision

Each clinical case (assessment, treatment, or consultation) is assigned to a supervisor who is a licensed psychologist. This supervisor meets face-to-face each week with the fellow for supervision and reviews each case and signs all treatment and discharge notes. In addition, in accordance with Ohio State Law, each individual receiving clinical care receives a letter documenting the supervised nature of the services that they are receiving. Evaluation for clinical care will take place by the primary clinical supervisors and will be based on the degree of competence in the specific areas of practice of the fellow, the responsiveness and timeliness of their communications with multi-disciplinary colleagues and family members, and documentation and records.

The Director of the Postdoctoral Fellowship Training Program in Psychology and the Clinical Director of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology at Cincinnati Children’s oversee this supervision process and communicate in accordance with state law to the State Board of Psychology in Ohio.

Each fellow is expected to take part in research that is significant, empirically sound and ethically appropriate. The degree of involvement and the specific projects will be set between fellow and mentor at the beginning of the fellowship. Several fellowships are heavily research-oriented. Specific goals for research will be set for each six-month period.

Every postdoctoral fellow will attend the Psychology Research Group and Writer’s Workshop seminars that occur monthly and will have the opportunity to present proposals and manuscripts and to review others’ work. For each session, faculty will provide guidance to the postdoctoral fellow. The presenting fellow will work closely with his mentor during preparation.

Research will be evaluated on the basis of significance, scientific merit, innovation and human subjects’ issues. In addition, many of the focus areas have specific journal clubs pertinent to their subject area; all fellows are invited to attend these journal clubs. Evaluation for research will take place by determining the degree to which the fellow is accomplishing goals.

Each fellow will be expected to participate in providing lectures / presentations to students and colleagues of other disciplines, areas of focus or different levels of training. Some fellows will be involved in “umbrella supervision” of graduate students or psychology residents. It exists when a supervisee supervises other psychology supervisees in hazardous practices.” (ORC) Supervisors will evaluate fellows’ teaching and mentoring by determining whether they have accomplished the specific teaching activities set as objectives. In addition, evaluators will apply formal evaluation forms, faculty observation and informal feedback from participants when assessing fellows.
Each fellow will be expected to work closely with colleagues of different disciplines or areas of focus. Fellows are expected to be respectful of the knowledge base of those from other disciplines or areas of focus, and to provide consultation to those from other disciplines or areas of focus. For all of the focus areas, fellows are automatically part of at least one multidisciplinary activity or team. Evaluation will occur by assessing the fellows’ competence as members of their multidisciplinary teams.
Each fellow is required to participate in a minimum of two hours a week of didactic learning experiences. Most of these hours will be completed in seminars related to the fellows’ specific focus areas. There are three monthly seminars that all postdoctoral fellows are required to attend, and a number of general seminars that each fellow and her mentor can choose. Each fellow will be asked to keep a monthly log of seminars attended that will be submitted to his mentor and the director of training every six months.

Self-Assessment and Initial Goal Setting

We believe it is beneficial for the fellow to assess their baseline skills and experiences via our program’s Fellow Self-Assessment Form. During the first month of training, fellows rate their perceived competence and confidence across specific research and clinical skills. This self-assessment is not meant to be evaluative, but simply to start a dialogue about past experiences and to enhance the goal setting.  By definition, fellows should be entering fellowship training at CCHMC because they have specific skills they wish to further develop.  The Fellow and Faculty mentor/supervisor(s) should formulate specific and individualized goals and objectives for training based on this Fellow Self-Assessment Form. Fellows are set goals and are evaluated across the following areas: Educational, Clinical, Research, Teaching/Mentoring, and Professional Relationships/Development. The Self-Assessment and Goal Setting Forms are reviewed by the Program Director. Feedback will be provided for revisions, if necessary. The final document is signed by all parties.

Evaluation Process

Fellow Evaluation: At 6-month intervals, the primary supervisor and fellow complete a series of evaluations The fellow prefills the Goals and Fellow Evaluation form with their initial (or previous goals) and provides documentation of progress towards each goal.  Fellows are set goals and are evaluated across the following areas: Educational, Clinical, Research, Teaching/Mentoring, and Professional Relationships/Development. The primary supervisor will then add their comments and ratings to this form to ensure both the evaluation and progress towards goals is captured in one document. Fellows ask secondary clinical or research supervisors to provide written feedback to their primary mentor to be integrated into this single document. New goals are also set for the next 6-month period.  The Evaluation forms are reviewed by the Program Director. Feedback will be provided for revisions, if necessary. The final document is signed by all parties.

Ratings: Fellows are evaluated on a 3-point scale to denote current status across Educational, Clinical, Research, Teaching/Mentoring, and Professional Relationships/Development domains. A “Needs Improvement (1)” rating indicates that the trainee does not meet expectations for performance at this point in her/his training. This rating indicates that this is a specific area of relative weakness and that the trainee’s performance needs to be discussed with the Postdoctoral Fellowship Training Director (See Due Process Policy). The narrative needs to describe in detail the problem area and outline a plan for addressing this area. A rating “On Target (2)” indicates that the trainee currently meets expectations for performance at this point in his/her training. Supervisors should be aware that brief behavior changes do not necessarily override previous or overall performance. Additionally, if a Postdoctoral Fellow previously has received a rating of a “Needs Improvement” on a goal, the Postdoctoral Fellow should demonstrate a consistent improvement in performance before a “On Target” is awarded on that goal.  A rating of “Exceptional Performance (3)” indicates the trainee has gone above and beyond in this area of performance. This rating is given rarely, and content should reflect how the trainee has had exceptional performance in this area.

Evaluation of Mentors, Supervisors, and Training Program. Clinical and Research Mentors/Supervisors are evaluated along the same timeline (every six months) using program specific forms. The Evaluation forms are reviewed by the Program Director. Feedback will be provided if necessary. The final document is signed by all parties. Fellows evaluate the training program throughout the year, as well as formally at the end of the training year.  An anonymous online survey is provided for this end-of-year evaluation, which is compiled by the Co-Chiefs and presented to faculty, with a copy forwarded to the CCHMC Graduate Medical Education Office.

Appeal, due process and grievances. Fellows and training faculty have the right to appeal any evaluation they have received. Fellows and their supervisors are encouraged to work out any difficulties within the context of the supervisory relationship and among focus area faculty. Any difficulties that cannot be resolved or persist should be brought directly to the Director of Postdoctoral Fellowship Training. Procedures for appeal, due process, grievances, and handling professional impairment are reviewed at the annual fellow and faculty orientation and are included on the program website and in the program manual.

We have a due process policy and a grievance policy in place. Fellows and faculty receive a copy of these procedures at the commencement of training, with a copy included in the training manual.

Seminars and Didactics

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TitlePostdoctoral Fellowship Didactic Seminar
Frequency: Once a month
Organizer:  Co-Chief Fellows
Purpose:  To provide a forum to discuss issues of professional development such as grant writing, preparing for job talks, negotiating job offers, interviewing, etc. A 2nd year fellow will be responsible for facilitating each didactic.


Title: Psychology Research Group seminar (PRG)
Frequency:  Once a month (additional dates added as needed)
Organizer:  Kevin Hommel, Ph.D.
Purpose:  To foster the development and review of research projects within the division. Fellows both observe and participate in the peer review process, primarily focused on grants.


TitleDivision of Behavioral Medicine & Clinical Psychology Colloquium
Frequency: Once a month
Organizer:  Meg Zeller, Ph.D.
Purpose:  To provide 2nd year post-doctoral fellows a local opportunity to present their research and/or clinical “job-talk” to peers, faculty, and interested staff. Fellows are provided with oral and written feedback on presentation style, slide-set, and content.


Title: Fellow’s Annual Retreat
Frequency: Once a year
Organizer:  Co-Chief Fellows
Purpose:The Fellows attend a one-day off-site retreat to discuss the fellowship program and professional development opportunities, including logistics on licensure and the EPPP. The day typically begins with a group activity, followed by lunch and discussion of the above topics.

Title: Stats for Fellows
Frequency: bimonthly
Organizer: Joseph Rausch, Ph.D. & James Peugh, Ph.D.
Purpose: Provide more in-depth didactic training in various statistical packages for fellows.
Audience: Open to all Psychology fellows.


Title: Writer’s Workshop
Frequency: monthly
Organizer: Kevin Hommel, PhD and Meg Zeller, PhD
Purpose: To provide a supportive group-based critique of fellows’ manuscripts in progress, revise and resubmit editorial verdicts, grant proposals.
Audience: Open to all fellows.


Title: T32 Fellowship Seminar
Frequency: biweekly
Organizer: Kevin Hommel, PhD and Meg Zeller, PhD
Purpose: This is a required (combined) seminar for T32 fellows from Child Behavior and Nutrition and the Center for Adherence and Self-Management to topics related to ethics and research misconduct, skills in manuscript writing and peer review, and grant-writing. Fellows also present a “research in progress” during their second year of training.
Audience: Open to all fellows. Required for T32s.


Title: Pre-PRG 
Frequency:  monthly prior to PRG
Organizer:  Fellowship co-chiefs
Purpose:  To allow fellow reviewers and other fellows an opportunity to informally discuss grants to be reviewed during PRG
Audience: Open to all fellows.


Title: BMCP Quantitative Methods Seminars: Discovery with Data Analysis (DDA)
Frequency: monthly
Organizer: Joseph Rausch, PhD
Purpose: To review various quantitative strategies for data analysis


Title: Fellows CrossTalk
Frequency: twice a month
Organizer: Cincinnati Children's Office of Pediatric Clinical Fellows
Purpose: Each CrossTalk session will include two separate 15 minute presentations from current Cincinnati Children's clinical fellows, followed by a short feedback session by the presenters peers and mentors. Presentations will address planned research from junior fellows (first-year fellows) and on-going or completed research from senior fellows (second- and third-year fellows).


Title: Clinical Research Forum
Frequency:  monthly (October-June)
Organizer: sponsored by the Center for Clinical and Translational Research
Purpose: Features presentations by investigators focusing on patient-oriented research.


TitlePediatric Grand Rounds
Frequency: every Tuesday
Time: 8:00 am – 9:00 am
Organizer:  Department of Pediatrics
Purpose:  To keep psychologists abreast of current developments in pediatric research and clinical care.


Title:  Psychiatry Grand Rounds
Frequency:  monthly
Organizer:  Cincinnati Children's Division of Psychiatry
Purpose:  To provide exposure to psychiatric issues relevant to pediatric populations.


Title:  All Fellows Rounds
Frequency:  Twice per month
Organizer:  Cincinnati Children's Office of Clinical Fellowships
Moderator:  Tom DeWitt, M.D.
Purpose:  To provide exposure to clinical issues relevant to a pediatric population outside of psychology.


Title: Quality Improvement and Health Services Research Seminar 
Frequency: once a month
Purpose: To provide a forum for discussing quality improvement research


Title: Topics in Clinical Research Series 
Frequency: variable
Organizer: Cincinnati Children's General Clinical Research Center
Purpose: to familiarize participants with the broad array of clinical research currently being conducted at Children's Hospital Medical Center
Scheduling: The schedule for upcoming trainings and registration information can be found online here.   


Title:  Grant Proposal Writing Workshops
Frequency:  http://www.grantcentral.com/prostaff_DrRussell.html
Time:
  TBD
Organizer:  University of Cincinnati
Purpose:  To provide fundamental training on NIH grant writing.


Title:  American Psychological Association Advanced Training Institute
Frequency:  http://www.apa.org/science/resources/ati/index.aspx
Time:
  Check website
Organizer:  American Psychological Association
Purpose:  Provides training in a variety of areas for research professional development.


Title: Ethics Seminar - “Ethics in Research” class
Frequency: offered once a year in the winter quarter
Organizer: offered through the Biomedical Ethics Committee of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
Purpose: To help participants to develop responsible conduct in research related to ethical issues arising in medicine, bio-medical research, and health policy.


Title: Cincinnati Children's Office of Faculty Development (OFD) Career Development Series
Frequency: Monthly
Organizer: Cincinnati Children's OFD
Purpose: Covers topics including “how to stay funded after your first success”, conflict management, creating a CV and personal statement, and mentoring across gender, ethnic, and generational differences. Fellows choose topics of interest based on relevance.


Title: Ready, Set, Go! Workshops for a Successful Research Career
Frequency: Monthly
Organizer: The University of Cincinnati Office of Research
Purpose: A 10-workshop series designed to target increasing competencies and skills in setting up and maintaining a successful research lab and program. Led by faculty from across University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children's, these interactive workshops include topics such as hiring skilled research staff, lab conflict management, time management, and mentoring.

DDBP/Autism

Title: Diagnostic and Treatment Case Conference
Frequency: once per month  
Organizer: Rebekah Ridgeway, PsyD
Purpose: to review upcoming cases returning for their feedback session.  This provides a forum for fellows to develop their case presentation skills and communication with multiple disciplines. 

Title: Providing Clinical Supervision
Frequency: bimonthly
Organizer: Rebekah Ridgeway, PsyD
Purpose: to provide fellows with training in clinical supervision and to provide a forum to discuss umbrella supervision cases. 


Neuropsychology

Title:   Neuropsychology Didactic Series and Case Conference
Frequency: once a week
Organizer: Christian von Thomsen, Psy.D./Brenna LeJeune, PhD
Purpose: To educate fellows about a range of neurological and developmental conditions that are commonly seen in pediatric neuropsychology practice and to provide fellows with a forum in which to develop their case presentation skills.

Title: Veteran’s Affairs (VA) Neuropsychology Didactic Series
Frequency: once a week (1st year)
Organizer: Wes Houston, Ph.D.
Purpose: To educate fellows, interns, and  neuropsychologists about various medical, neurological, and cognitive disorders commonly seen in adult outpatient settings and to provide the opportunity to develop presentation and case conceptualization skills.

Title:   ABPP Neuropsychological Readings Group  
Frequency: every two weeks
Organizer: Christian von Thomsen, Psy.D.
Purpose: To review readings in preparation for the ABPP written exam. Intended for fellows, junior faculty, and select graduate students.

Title:   Pediatric Neuropsychological Readings Group  
Frequency: every two weeks
Organizer: Dean Beebe, PhD
Purpose: To review readings relevant to pediatric neuropsychology, developmental psychology, and child psychology, as they pertain to clinical cases seen through the fellowship.


Adherence T32

Title: Adherence Center Fellowship Seminar
Frequency: monthly
Organizer: Kevin Hommel, PhD
Purpose: To discuss topics related to treatment adherence and professional development

Title: T32 Fellowship Seminar
Frequency: biweekly
Organizer: Kevin Hommel, PhD and Meg Zeller, PhD
Purpose: This is a required (combined) seminar for T32 fellows from Child Behavior and Nutrition and the Center for Adherence and Self-Management to topics related to ethics and research misconduct, skills in manuscript writing and peer review, and grant-writing. Fellows also present a “research in progress” during their second year of training.

Title: Writer’s Workshop
Frequency: monthly
Organizer: Kevin Hommel, PhD and Meg Zeller, PhD
Purpose: To provide a supportive group-based critique of fellows’ manuscripts in progress, revise and resubmit editorial verdicts, grant proposals.


Child Behavior and Nutrition T32

Title: Behavior, Assessment, Nutrition, Treatment, Evaluation and Research: BANTER  
Frequency: quarterly
Organizer: Meg Zeller, PhD
Purpose: To discuss topics related to child behavior and nutrition. Topics chosen each year based on fellow interest and training background.

Title: T32 Fellowship Seminar
Frequency: biweekly
Organizer: Kevin Hommel, PhD and Meg Zeller, PhD
Purpose: This is a required (combined) seminar for T32 fellows from Child Behavior and Nutrition and the Center for Adherence and Self-Management to topics related to ethics and research misconduct, skills in manuscript writing and peer review, and grant-writing. Fellows also present a “research in progress” during their second year of training.

Title: Writer’s Workshop
Frequency: monthly
Organizer: Kevin Hommel, PhD and Meg Zeller, PhD
Purpose: To provide a supportive group-based critique of fellows’ manuscripts in progress, revise and resubmit editorial verdicts, grant proposals.